highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I might buy the Tool Shop brand of this. It's under $10 at Menards. It's a 3/8 and 1/2 combo. Then get the 1/4 reversible click at Harbor Freight for $20.
Personally, I wouldn't buy a beam-type torque wrench- you have to view the scale from directly over it and sometimes, that's not possible.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
It's almost expensive as buying a decent cheap one- as long as I know how far out of spec it is, I can work with it but it's annoying that such an expensive tool would be so inaccurate.
How far off was it? They all go out of spec in use. Then again SnapOn ain't what it used to be....
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Personally, I wouldn't buy a beam-type torque wrench- you have to view the scale from directly over it and sometimes, that's not possible.
Yes, more challenging to use than a click or beep to tell ya when you're there, but simpler/cheaper and doesn't really go out of spec :)
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
Bought the 1/4 at Harbor Freight. Oddly they didn't have the allen set to go with it. I'll have to look around.

What size range should I be looking for with the allens?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Bought the 1/4 at Harbor Freight. Oddly they didn't have the allen set to go with it. I'll have to look around.

What size range should I be looking for with the allens?
Generally in one mm increments from 2mm to 8mm covers most needs, sometimes 10, 12 are used, tho (and sometimes an odd half size is used, like 2.5). Best thing to do is to check your own bikes for what's needed (and you may need to look up service documents to check).

Harbor Freight had no 1/4" metric stuff? Or just really limited?
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
Found this...

The saddle rail clamp is usually 6mm.
Seat post collar 4 or 5.
Stem bolts 5 or 6.
Rear derailleur mount 6.
Front derailleur mount 5.
Crank bolt 8.
Bottle cage 4.
Rack bolts 4.
Cable pinch bolts 5.
Brifter bolts 5.
Pedals 6 or 8.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
Generally in one mm increments from 2mm to 8mm covers most needs, sometimes 10, 12 are used, tho (and sometimes an odd half size is used, like 2.5). Best thing to do is to check your own bikes for what's needed (and you may need to look up service documents to check).

Harbor Freight had no 1/4" metric stuff? Or just really limited?
Nothing. Everything started at 3/8 drive socket.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
How far off was it? They all go out of spec in use. Then again SnapOn ain't what it used to be....
It was about 5% off but the torque specs in most manuals recommend 4%. It's not a lot, really, but I didn't know it was that far off when I installed the head on a boat engine, but after asking someone at Mercruiser, I'm not going to worry about it. I just assumed it would be closer BECAUSE IT WAS FREAKING EXPENSIVE.

I bought it in the late-'80s- I also bought SAE & Metric short impact sockets, medium length SAE & Metric chrome sockets, combo wrenches, a couple of swivel-head ratchets, Phillips screwdrivers and a new-found source of debt by opening a truck account. I also bought a used tool box because I would never spend as much on a new one as they ask.They're great boxes and the steel is much stiffer than the cheap stuff, but I know people whose big carts and boxes cost more than most of my cars. I will say that I have had a remarkably small number of problems with my SnapOn tools- I have only needed to replace a couple of screwdriver blades and I have used them a lot and I can't guess as how many times they have landed tip-down on concrete floors. The 1/4" swivel head ratched has landed on concrete many times and I have used it under water- I think I lubed it once. I used to replace a lot of Craftsman tools- screwdriver tips wore out quickly and the one that broke the camel's back was a brand new one that shattered when I was trying to remove a screw and I wasn't in a position to exert much force. Five minutes later, the SnapOn guy showed up and saved me.

BTW- Craftsman tools can still be replaced by the store where they were purchased or for older tools, by calling a phone number that can be found online- I recently received replacements for a set of SAE 1/2" sockets and two extensions. Not sure I would buy theirs new anymore, but it's good to see that the new owners are supporting the brand.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Yes, more challenging to use than a click or beep to tell ya when you're there, but simpler/cheaper and doesn't really go out of spec :)
Unless someone abuses it and I have seen a few of the beam-type that wouldn't zero out.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
To be fair, after I use a torque wrench a lot on my bikes and kind of get my "hands calibrated", I sometimes only actually use the torque wrench for the most critical applications. And, of course I have had to make trailside repairs when I didn't have a torque wrench anyway.

I just have the clicky-style torque wrenches. Not my favorite, but the prices were right.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
To be fair, after I use a torque wrench a lot on my bikes and kind of get my "hands calibrated", I sometimes only actually use the torque wrench for the most critical applications. And, of course I have had to make trailside repairs when I didn't have a torque wrench anyway.

I just have the clicky-style torque wrenches. Not my favorite, but the prices were right.
Yeah over time you get a feel for it. In the beginning, tho, I would check what I would normally have thought seemed right...and was glad I made the investment. Like a good tire gauge is another must have IMO.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Yeah over time you get a feel for it. In the beginning, tho, I would check what I would normally have thought seemed right...and was glad I made the investment. Like a good tire gauge is another must have IMO.
Agreed on the tire gauge! Especially for high volume / low pressure tires. When I'm on my + bike, 0.5-1psi difference can be huge (running 17/19psi).

For other bikes with more traditional tires, it's more about consistent performance vs. absolute performance.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Agreed on the tire gauge! Especially for high volume / low pressure tires. When I'm on my + bike, 0.5-1psi difference can be huge (running 17/19psi).

For other bikes with more traditional tires, it's more about consistent performance vs. absolute performance.
Reminds me of when I first found the value of a tire gauge, had recently gone back to a road style bike, having not ridden my Schwinn Super Sport for many years at that point, but having had a new fangled mountain bike for a coupla years. I had always just used my fingers....fairly firm on the mountain bike and really firm on the skinny tires :). Went on a ride that had too much crappy asphalt and kept flatting from pinch flats....with a couple spare tubes and a repair kit I still barely avoided walking the last bit home (and I probably just squeezed the tires after the bike had been sitting a few days or a week before I went out on the ride). In reading up learned about pinch flats and the importance of proper tire pressure, particularly with my 700c wheels with 23mm tires (being all racer boy minded, much narrower than my old Schwinn used even tho similar diameter)....so I used my pump with gauge back home and figured out my fingers were useless at higher pressures (since my portable frame pump had no gauge), I was consistently underinflating them judging them that way. Now it's somewhat the other end of the spectrum with my 27.5" fat tires....where like you say a psi or two does make a significant difference and my fingers are just lousy at it. I have a few gauges now for home and on the road/trail.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Reminds me of when I first found the value of a tire gauge, had recently gone back to a road style bike, having not ridden my Schwinn Super Sport for many years at that point, but having had a new fangled mountain bike for a coupla years. I had always just used my fingers....fairly firm on the mountain bike and really firm on the skinny tires :). Went on a ride that had too much crappy asphalt and kept flatting from pinch flats....with a couple spare tubes and a repair kit I still barely avoided walking the last bit home (and I probably just squeezed the tires after the bike had been sitting a few days or a week before I went out on the ride). In reading up learned about pinch flats and the importance of proper tire pressure, particularly with my 700c wheels with 23mm tires (being all racer boy minded, much narrower than my old Schwinn used even tho similar diameter)....so I used my pump with gauge back home and figured out my fingers were useless at higher pressures (since my portable frame pump had no gauge), I was consistently underinflating them judging them that way. Now it's somewhat the other end of the spectrum with my 27.5" fat tires....where like you say a psi or two does make a significant difference and my fingers are just lousy at it. I have a few gauges now for home and on the road/trail.
I have a Topeak digi gauge, which is nice, but only reads in 1psi increments. I was a little disappointed that after about 1 year it stopped working. I just had to take it apart and clean up the button contacts and it started working again.

But, my overall favorites are the Accu-Rite analog gauges! Very good gauges, reasonable price, high quality.

These analog gauges are better than any digi guage I have ever seen. In general, analog gear can be superior to the best digi gear. The caveat is that they are not as robust, as in, don't drop it! And, digi gauges are easier to use for people that have never been properly trained on analog gear.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
Finally found a 2-14mm hex set. Seemed like many didn't cover a wide enough range.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
I have a Topeak digi gauge, which is nice, but only reads in 1psi increments. I was a little disappointed that after about 1 year it stopped working. I just had to take it apart and clean up the button contacts and it started working again.

But, my overall favorites are the Accu-Rite analog gauges! Very good gauges, reasonable price, high quality.

These analog gauges are better than any digi guage I have ever seen. In general, analog gear can be superior to the best digi gear. The caveat is that they are not as robust, as in, don't drop it! And, digi gauges are easier to use for people that have never been properly trained on analog gear.
When I first got the fat tires I got a low range digital gauge that had .5 lb increments but I lost it on the trail, SKS brand I think it was, but I've generally used good quality analog gauges. I picked up an AccuGage as that's what the bike shop was using on the stand and had in stock, analog with a brass chuck, nice big scale and goes low, altho kinda big for the backpack. I use an Accutire digital gauge on my van as I needed one that can read out to 80 or so psi, which exceeded the range of most of the schrader analog gauges I could find.
 

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