lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
I will have to find an alternative to Park Tools. Waaaaaaay above my budget. A torque wrench kit might be a good idea though.
I was started off in bike maintenance with Park and have largely stuck with them over the years, but never bought a "kit" particularly, but rather collected single tools as needed. At one point even used my tools in a bike shop I co-owned. I also have nine bikes at home :)

Pedro's and Topeak have decent bike tools off the top of my head. Not sure they're going to be much cheaper, tho. How much did you spend on that tool kit you have, tho? Is it much help?

Torque range on a bike isn't like on a car, somewhat different needs. I use a Snapon torque wrench that I got thru my brother when he was a dealer, for the range of the smaller stuff generally found on a bike (up to 200 inch lbs) and use an older/larger Park wrench (TW-2) for the higher torque values up to 600 inch lbs (like a bottom bracket). Looks like Park has modernized to ratcheting torque wrenches now. Harbor Freight may have something cheap....
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
I was started off in bike maintenance with Park and have largely stuck with them over the years, but never bought a "kit" particularly, but rather collected single tools as needed. At one point even used my tools in a bike shop I co-owned. I also have nine bikes at home :)

Pedro's and Topeak have decent bike tools off the top of my head. Not sure they're going to be much cheaper, tho. How much did you spend on that tool kit you have, tho? Is it much help?

Torque range on a bike isn't like on a car, somewhat different needs. I use a Snapon torque wrench that I got thru my brother when he was a dealer, for the range of the smaller stuff generally found on a bike (up to 200 inch lbs) and use an older/larger Park wrench (TW-2) for the higher torque values up to 600 inch lbs (like a bottom bracket). Looks like Park has modernized to ratcheting torque wrenches now. Harbor Freight may have something cheap....
I meant a bike torque kit. Haven't used the tools yet. Probably around $40. My expectations are low.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
I meant a bike torque kit. Haven't used the tools yet. Probably around $40. My expectations are low.
Then again a visit to a local bike shop for parts and installation could work too. I do encourage self-maintenance for the long term, tho....glad my more mechanical minded friends and brother pushed me in that direction long ago.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Then again a visit to a local bike shop for parts and installation could work too. I do encourage self-maintenance for the long term, tho....glad my more mechanical minded friends and brother pushed me in that direction long ago.
That's the idea. If I can't figure it out myself I can always bring it in.

Is a 53/39 about what I need to replace the ring?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
That's the idea. If I can't figure it out myself I can always bring it in.

Is a 53/39 about what I need to replace the ring?
Well that's a dual ring setup used mostly on road bikes....and the 53t is fairly different from your current 48t, i.e. will take you further with more effort for the same crank revolution; the 39t is close enuf to your current 38t, tho. Personally I changed my road bike from a 53/39 down to a 48/38 (often called a cyclocross crank/ring setup) a few years back, takes the top speed down a bit but that's usually when on a long downhill anyways :).

Did you determine if you can just change rings on the current crankset or are you thinking of a new crankset? The front derailleur capacity needs to be able to accept the larger big ring, and make sure the rings and crank use the same bcd pattern (bolt circle diameter/number of bolts) if the crank can accept other rings.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Well that's a dual ring setup used mostly on road bikes....and the 53t is fairly different from your current 48t, i.e. will take you further with more effort for the same crank revolution; the 39t is close enuf to your current 38t, tho. Personally I changed my road bike from a 53/39 down to a 48/38 (often called a cyclocross crank/ring setup) a few years back, takes the top speed down a bit but that's usually when on a long downhill anyways :).

Did you determine if you can just change rings on the current crankset or are you thinking of a new crankset? The front derailleur capacity needs to be able to accept the larger big ring, and make sure the rings and crank use the same bcd pattern (bolt circle diameter/number of bolts) if the crank can accept other rings.
Now that you mention it best to just change the rings with a 48/38. The cranks as far as I can feel are working fine. New cassette and maybe upgrade the rear derailleur. The rear tire moves from side to side when I pull on a spoke. Not sure why? I know it isn't because the tire isn't fastened tight enough.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
I will have to find an alternative to Park Tools. Waaaaaaay above my budget. A torque wrench kit might be a good idea though.
Park tools are nice, no doubt! But, most general home mechanics won't need to spend that much $ for tools they will seldom use, and make no mistake that you are paying a premium for the Park name.

I have a few Park tools, where I felt the premium paid was worth the $. When that is not the case, I bought other brands for a fraction of the price that were either just as good, or good enough for me and my limited use cases.

EDIT--I have found a couple of brands that offer incredible bang for the buck, high quality at good prices. I believe these are house-brands for Jenson and Chain Reaction Cycles-- Lifeline Tools and X-Tools.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I meant a bike torque kit. Haven't used the tools yet. Probably around $40. My expectations are low.
Assuming you have a list of specs, you don't need to spend a lot for a halfway decent torque wrench- YouTube has reviews of them and the stuff from Harbor Freight is about as accurate as anything and their digital torque adapter is very accurate- it attaches to a regular ratchet wrench and beeps when it hits the number.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Assuming you have a list of specs, you don't need to spend a lot for a halfway decent torque wrench- YouTube has reviews of them and the stuff from Harbor Freight is about as accurate as anything and their digital torque adapter is very accurate- it attaches to a regular ratchet wrench and beeps when it hits the number.
@Dude#1279435 it should be noted that for a bike, you will have both right-hand and left-hand threads in a few places. My big torque wrench can set the proper torque in both directions. That is not a given, so you have to look for that feature.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
@Dude#1279435 it should be noted that for a bike, you will have both right-hand and left-hand threads in a few places. My big torque wrench can set the proper torque in both directions. That is not a given, so you have to look for that feature.
Good point. My Park TW-2 looks like this, doesnt care about direction, has a scale in both of them :) I don't think I've needed my other torque wrench except on normal threadings....
tw-2.jpg
 
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Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
How universal are Shimano/SRAM parts when it comes to chainrings, derailleurs etc, or do I need to go with pretty exact parts?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I have an expensive SnapOn 1/2" drive torque wrench and had it tested in one of their trucks- it's slightly out of spec, even though it has never been dropped and it cost almost $300 because cheaper options weren't very good at the time. I can now buy one for far less that's more accurate and that really annoys me.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
I have an expensive SnapOn 1/2" drive torque wrench and had it tested in one of their trucks- it's slightly out of spec, even though it has never been dropped and it cost almost $300 because cheaper options weren't very good at the time. I can now buy one for far less that's more accurate and that really annoys me.
Slightly translates to what? They couldn't recalibrate it?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
How universal are Shimano/SRAM parts when it comes to chainrings, derailleurs etc, or do I need to go with pretty exact parts?
Well there are some differences, mismatches, altho some interchangeability as well. SRAM Eagle 12sp derailleur/shifter/cogset like I've got on my latest bikes wouldn't mix with the Shimano 8/9 speed stuff I have on my previous bikes. For your Jamis they're more similar, tho for the 7/8/9 speed stuff. Both Shimano and SRAM have gruppos/groupsets that come in ranges (like Shimano's best is XTR, next best is XT, then SLX for mountain or for road it'd be best as Dura-Ace, next best Ultegra, then 105....and SRAM has similar groups too). Usually within the same technology you've can use anything from the range, like the way some bikes come with a mixture to customize the group, and keep costs to a target.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Should I buy 1/4 or 3/8 torque or doesn't matter?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Should I buy 1/4 or 3/8 torque or doesn't matter?
Do you have a bunch of sockets that would fit one vs the other? My smaller bolts are more suited to my 1/4" drive but for larger values I go to my 3/8" drive. So more about the range you can cover with what wrench/drive.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Do you have a bunch of sockets that would fit one vs the other? My smaller bolts are more suited to my 1/4" drive but for larger values I go to my 3/8" drive. So more about the range you can cover with what wrench/drive.
No I only have regular sockets. I have to yet to buy a bike socket kit.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
No I only have regular sockets. I have to yet to buy a bike socket kit.
You probably need mostly allen head metric bits for the bolts/fasteners on most bikes, but on my newer bikes they've also been sneaking in some bolts with torx heads, too.
 
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Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Good point. My Park TW-2 looks like this, doesnt care about direction, has a scale in both of them :) I don't think I've needed my other torque wrench except on normal threadings....
View attachment 47162
I might buy the Tool Shop brand of this. It's under $10 at Menards. It's a 3/8 and 1/2 combo. Then get the 1/4 reversible click at Harbor Freight for $20.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Slightly translates to what? They couldn't recalibrate it?
It's almost expensive as buying a decent cheap one- as long as I know how far out of spec it is, I can work with it but it's annoying that such an expensive tool would be so inaccurate.
 

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