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Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Even just the Shimano technical documents describing a part or system will include good info on how to do things, torque specs, etc. Haven't looked in a while but some great basic stuff is available at sheldonbrown.com (Sheldon passed a while back so the info tends to be for older tech, but still quite helpful in general terms.

Tools can be specialized, you have what bike tools particularly? Crank/bottom bracket tools? Cassette tools?
Yes those should all be in my bike tool kit.

 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Here's a short video that gives good closeups.....
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
My dad had the Continental. I splurged with my newspaper delivery money and got the Super Sport....which I rode for many years. It had cro moly tubing! But was still a tank, as were most of the basic non-Waterford type Schwinns at the time.
What vintage were these Schwinns? Mine was from 1970, at the latest. I lost three Schwinn Stingray Fastback bikes to thieves and after the last one, I decided to buy something thieves wouldn't want. Lucky me- I didn't want it, either. My brother didn't take his bike to school, so I would ride that an it was a lot better- Raleigh Grand Prix. Lighter, much more responsive.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
What vintage were these Schwinns? Mine was from 1970, at the latest. I lost three Schwinn Stingray Fastback bikes to thieves and after the last one, I decided to buy something thieves wouldn't want. Lucky me- I didn't want it, either. My brother didn't take his bike to school, so I would ride that an it was a lot better- Raleigh Grand Prix. Lighter, much more responsive.
'70 I think it was for dad's Continental while we still lived in the midwest, got mine in 71 in Santa Monica....had various other Schwinns, including a converted 20" wheeled
"stingray" before that (my grandpa used to play golf with Mr Schwinn) that was the result of someone stealing the bike and me getting it back after a friend of a friend clued us in as to who stole it and converted it, and I was rather thrilled as I'd been wanting a Stingray at the time :). Raleigh had some lighter stuff back then, but then I'd think at the time most any european brand was lighter than Schwinn (except for the really nice frames they made at their Waterford facility).
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
LOL I mean of the tool kit, so I know what you have. I don't recognize the kit....
Unbranded
UPC:738568834705

1 x Seal Middle Axle Installation Tool
1 x Cartesian Step Pulley Handling Tool
1 x Fixed Flywheel Handling Tool
1 x Steel Wire Wrench
1 x 8", 9" 10" Open Ring Wrench
2 x 14"16"-13"15" Gear Shaft Wrench
1 x 6"/5"/4"/3"/2"/1" Allen Wrench
1 x Middle Axle Handling Tool
1 x Ordinary Middle Axle Handing Tool Hook Spanner
1 x 15"16"-15"17" Pedals Open Ring Wrench
1 x Ordinary Flywheel Handling Tool
4 x Interchangeable Phillips/ Flat End Screwdriver
1 x 150mm 6" Monkey wrench
3 x Tire Wrench
1 x Tire Repair Set (Not Including The Rubber Cement)
1 x Chain Handling Tool
1 x Crank Handling Tool
1 x Phillips Screwdriver
1 x Tire Air Pressure Detection Pen
3 x 10"/9"8" Hexagonal Socket Wrench Plug
1 x Hexagonal Socket Wrench Connecting Rod
1 x Flywheel/Sealed Middle Axle Handling Tool Connecting Rod
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
'70 I think it was for dad's Continental while we still lived in the midwest, got mine in 71 in Santa Monica....had various other Schwinns, including a converted 20" wheeled
"stingray" before that (my grandpa used to play golf with Mr Schwinn) that was the result of someone stealing the bike and me getting it back after a friend of a friend clued us in as to who stole it and converted it, and I was rather thrilled as I'd been wanting a Stingray at the time :). Raleigh had some lighter stuff back then, but then I'd think at the time most any european brand was lighter than Schwinn (except for the really nice frames they made at their Waterford facility).
I don't remember how heavy or light the Stingrays were, but I do remember hating that Varsity. The Schwinns were durable, though. I was never one to abuse my stuff, but we did push some limits.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
I'll go look thru my parts boxes now that I've got some specifics. What happened to the components that need replacing? Do you have the tools/knowledge to install replacements?
No parts I assume???
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
No parts I assume???
LOL took the computer out to the shop to see what I could match up and started some reorganizing of my own gear, and that's as far as I got....back out there this afternoon!
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
LOL took the computer out to the shop to see what I could match up and started some reorganizing of my own gear, and that's as far as I got....back out there this afternoon!
Thanks for the update.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Well thought I had another 8 speed cassette but all I have are my spare XTR stuff for my one 8 speed (and sorry, they're too valuable to give up). I have a coupla nines and even a seven, but no eight.

Is there something wrong with the front derailleur? They tend to be durable....but I don't have a match there either.

The rear derailleur I have a Shimano Altus A20 I think would work, also some Shimano M-735 XTs, all used, the A20 the least used. Altho again a rear derailleur can be pretty durable, altho changing out the pulley wheels and lubing are normal maintenance.

I didn't find anything definitive about your crankset about having replaceable chainrings (altho sometimes just cheaper to buy a new crankset with rings). I did remember having a spare crankset but seems its already been claimed out of my stash....or I just can't find it but seems I've located all the parts boxes I've got. Have some oddball chainrings but nothing in your tooth counts as mine are more mountain bike oriented.

I have several old square taper bottom brackets but no 68 x 110.5....
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Well thought I had another 8 speed cassette but all I have are my spare XTR stuff for my one 8 speed (and sorry, they're too valuable to give up). I have a coupla nines and even a seven, but no eight.

Is there something wrong with the front derailleur? They tend to be durable....but I don't have a match there either.

The rear derailleur I have a Shimano Altus A20 I think would work, also some Shimano M-735 XTs, all used, the A20 the least used. Altho again a rear derailleur can be pretty durable, altho changing out the pulley wheels and lubing are normal maintenance.

I didn't find anything definitive about your crankset about having replaceable chainrings (altho sometimes just cheaper to buy a new crankset with rings). I did remember having a spare crankset but seems its already been claimed out of my stash....or I just can't find it but seems I've located all the parts boxes I've got. Have some oddball chainrings but nothing in your tooth counts as mine are more mountain bike oriented.

I have several old square taper bottom brackets but no 68 x 110.5....
Nothing wrong with the front derailleur I'm aware of. Actually now that I think of it was thinking of a 2X wheel. I don't use the easy/small wheel. I'm not sure how that effects the entire chain drive though. 53/39 or so but can't remember for sure.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Nothing wrong with the front derailleur I'm aware of. Actually now that I think of it was thinking of a 2X wheel. I don't use the easy/small wheel. I'm not sure how that effects the entire chain drive though. 53/39 or so but can't remember for sure.
Changing a triple to a double chainring can be done a few ways, even with your current derailleur/crankset (if chainrings are removable or you could possibly just lock out the smallest), but I'd let a bike shop set it up. If you don't change your chain regularly you're likely to have overworn cassette and chainrings, tho, and best to just replace all of those together if they're all very worn. If you do replace the crankset/chainrings altogether again a bike shop is a good place to run things by (and possibly install seeing your toolset...never had a flywheel on a bike, maybe they mean freewheel which is largely gone now too). The size rings will affect front derailleur setup in any case.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Changing a triple to a double chainring can be done a few ways, even with your current derailleur/crankset (if chainrings are removable or you could possibly just lock out the smallest), but I'd let a bike shop set it up. If you don't change your chain regularly you're likely to have overworn cassette and chainrings, tho, and best to just replace all of those together if they're all very worn. If you do replace the crankset/chainrings altogether again a bike shop is a good place to run things by (and possibly install seeing your toolset...never had a flywheel on a bike, maybe they mean freewheel which is largely gone now too). The size rings will affect front derailleur setup in any case.
Are there specific tools beside my tool kit you think I'd need if I were to do it myself?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Are there specific tools beside my tool kit you think I'd need if I were to do it myself?
Just to change the cranks out you'd need a crank puller and appropriate wrenches which I don't think your kit has but am not sure due the strange descriptions (like middle axle....does that mean bottom bracket?). I generally stick to Park Tools for bikes myself, I have Park CCP-1, CCP-2 and a CCP-4 in my tool box for your type of bottom bracket (currently the CCP-22 it looks like, or maybe the CWP-7) and I sure wouldn't want to install a new one without a torque wrench for proper tightening of pretty much anything on a bike. To change out the cassettte you need a coupla tools like a chain whip and a splined cassette tool (like the Park BBT-5/FR-11). Not sure just what your kit is compatible with tho....
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
Just to change the cranks out you'd need a crank puller and appropriate wrenches which I don't think your kit has but am not sure due the strange descriptions (like middle axle....does that mean bottom bracket?). I generally stick to Park Tools for bikes myself, I have Park CCP-1, CCP-2 and a CCP-4 in my tool box for your type of bottom bracket (currently the CCP-22 it looks like, or maybe the CWP-7) and I sure wouldn't want to install a new one without a torque wrench for proper tightening of pretty much anything on a bike. To change out the cassettte you need a coupla tools like a chain whip and a splined cassette tool (like the Park BBT-5/FR-11). Not sure just what your kit is compatible with tho....
Think I will start with putting in a new chain and go from there.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Chief
I will have to find an alternative to Park Tools. Waaaaaaay above my budget. A torque wrench kit might be a good idea though.
 

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