What Happens When You Start Listening To Vinyl Again

M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
Volume control is more consistent with vinyl. I don't get to just open the player on the pc and see what's playing, timer etc. I have to just sit there and let it take care of itself until the LP is finished. Then the music just stops, the turn table returns to it's resting place and I am left wondering with, I guess it's time for me to get up and do something. . . .I like it though. Records are more consistent in quality it seems.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
<eargiant

<eargiant

Senior Audioholic
For the life of me, I can't think of anything that should make this a $1400 turntable but I don't remember its selling price when it was mass-produced.

The Mk2 version of the SL-1500 pictured below retailed for $390 back in '77-'78. That's about $1,600 today inflation adjusted.

I had one when it was brand new. It is a very robust turntable. Very heavy platter and the motor was based on the Technics SP-15 which was more robust than the SP-25 series motors.

While I have seen the new 1200 GAE I have not seen the new 1500c in person but I can tell you that something like the old SL-1500Mk2 was not a "toy". I would probably take even an old SL-1500Mk2 over any sub $1k new deck today especially if it's a DD (I'll take Technics DD motor over a Hanpin unit any day of the week).


 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
The Mk2 version of the SL-1500 pictured below retailed for $390 back in '77-'78. That's about $1,600 today inflation adjusted.

I had one when it was brand new. It is a very robust turntable. Very heavy platter and the motor was based on the Technics SP-15 which was more robust than the SP-25 series motors.

While I have seen the new 1200 GAE I have not seen the new 1500c in person but I can tell you that something like the old SL-1500Mk2 was not a "toy". I would probably take even an old SL-1500Mk2 over any sub $1k new deck today especially if it's a DD (I'll take Technics DD motor over a Hanpin unit any day of the week).


With cost reduction due to manufacturing advances and foreign money valuation/labor, I would think it could be made for less, although the economies of scale aren't what they were.

OTOH, I should consider inflation more often- it means I bought a turntable that would be the equivalent of more than $1000, now. That also makes the uopdated version of my Denon 103d cartridge an absolute bargain- it's available for $299. The 103d sold for about $300, in the early '80s.
 
<eargiant

<eargiant

Senior Audioholic
With cost reduction due to manufacturing advances and foreign money valuation/labor, I would think it could be made for less, although the economies of scale aren't what they were.

OTOH, I should consider inflation more often- it means I bought a turntable that would be the equivalent of more than $1000, now. That also makes the uopdated version of my Denon 103d cartridge an absolute bargain- it's available for $299. The 103d sold for about $300, in the early '80s.
I'm not so fond of using standard inflation calcs when comparing gear. Remember, nobody paid retail back then so it's not really a fair comparison. It was a totally different market. ;) Carts were even often thrown in to seal the deal.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I'm not so fond of using standard inflation calcs when comparing gear. Remember, nobody paid retail back then so it's not really a fair comparison. It was a totally different market. ;) Carts were even often thrown in to seal the deal.
Thrown in? Sometimes, but mostly, the various brands had at least one line that cost very little and could be sold for half off, which was a good way to package them, but in many cases, we would sell the middle of the line and explain that the upper models only varied in the stylus, not the body. We were pretty reasonable with replacement styli prices, too- full blast was too much of an eye gouge and we wanted happy customers. As far as paying retail, it depended on what the item was- if it was in high demand and low supply, yeah, it was sold for retail. We had some people offering more than retail, for some things.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
Thrown in? Sometimes, but mostly, the various brands had at least one line that cost very little and could be sold for half off, which was a good way to package them, but in many cases, we would sell the middle of the line and explain that the upper models only varied in the stylus, not the body. We were pretty reasonable with replacement styli prices, too- full blast was too much of an eye gouge and we wanted happy customers. As far as paying retail, it depended on what the item was- if it was in high demand and low supply, yeah, it was sold for retail. We had some people offering more than retail, for some things.
I bought some sort of technics Direct Drive TT with the strobe in 1978. Don't remember the model or exact price but I think it came with an Empire 2000e for $300 or so. Great little setup but I eventually went to belt drive TTs and Shure carts. Of course the Shures are long gone but I still have a belt drive Rega.
 
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highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I bought some sort of technics Direct Drive TT with the strobe. Don't remember the model or exact price but I think it came with an Empire 2000e for $300 or so. Great little setup but I eventually went to belt drive TTs and Shure carts. Of course the Shures are long gone but I still have a belt drive Rega.
My first system came with a BSR turntable/ADC cartridge and as soon as I saw what some of the others had at school, I realized that A) mine was a POS, B) it was ruining my LPs and C) I wanted a better one. A friend was working at a stereo store, so I went there and found one that seemed pretty decent, so I bought it. That one had an Empire 2002e and sounded much better but once I had upgraded the speakers, I found that it was susceptible to feedback. This wasn't much of a problem if the cover was left open, so I did that.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
My first system came with a BSR turntable/ADC cartridge and as soon as I saw what some of the others had at school, I realized that A) mine was a POS, B) it was ruining my LPs and C) I wanted a better one. A friend was working at a stereo store, so I went there and found one that seemed pretty decent, so I bought it. That one had an Empire 2002e and sounded much better but once I had upgraded the speakers, I found that it was susceptible to feedback. This wasn't much of a problem if the cover was left open, so I did that.
Empire Scientific made pretty good reasonably priced phono carts. They have passed into audio history like so many other good brands. (sigh) I bet a lot of peeps on this thread have at some time owned an Empire cart.
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
bump to this thread. :)Found a crate on the street before going to work today. My vinyl will be happy. Rahahaha
 
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davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
Yet many of those 15" speakers weren't digging very low either :).
Yeah I had a buddy back in the late 70s who had some 15 inch Ultralinear speakers which didn't really dig the deep. When I finally got some new advents a year later I heard some deep bass.
 
Gmoney

Gmoney

Audioholic Chief
Yeah I had a buddy back in the late 70s who had some 15 inch Ultralinear speakers which didn't really dig the deep. When I finally got some new advents a year later I heard some deep bass.
man it wasn’t till the mid 90’s till when I found out what bass really was. I picked up a pair of Cerwinvegas 18” drivers in them got a Carver TFM 25 amp paired with a Sony ES AVR which was my first ever AVR, My wife at the time would use ear plugs. :D
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
All good except for 2.1. No one had subwoofers in the days of vinyl.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
I wouldn't say that nobody had subs back then- M&K was pretty big, JBL offered subs (needed crossover and amp) and other brands were available.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
Back in the late 70s early 80s not a whole lot of material available that needed a sub if you had some Large Advents. But with digital and high def movies that did change.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
Back in the late 70s early 80s not a whole lot of material available that needed a sub if you had some Large Advents. But with digital and high def movies that did change.
While I loved my Original Advents (72) and they had decent bass, I'd still have preferred to have had subs with them but I don't think the audio stores I shopped at even had one anywhere thru the early 80s. Another speaker I'd love to have had subs with were my Carver Amazing Speakers....they needed help.
 

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