What Happens When You Start Listening To Vinyl Again

highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
That’s the reason I still spin my Vinyl, I have LP’s that go all the way back to 1972. Can’t find some of the tunes on CD or streaming.
I have my brothers' original copies of Cream's 'Disreali Gears', 'Wheels Of Fire', Jethro Tull's 'Stand Up' and King Crimson's Court Of The Crimson King', from '67, '68, '69 and '69, respectively. They sound like crap because of the turntable he had, but at least he had a good record cleaner (Dust Buster). I don't play them- they're past the point of no return but I did replace them. Those were real eye-openers for me, at 11 and 12 years old when he brought them home- still four of my favorites.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
I have my brothers' original copies of Cream's 'Disreali Gears', 'Wheels Of Fire', Jethro Tull's 'Stand Up' and King Crimson's Court Of The Crimson King', from '67, '68, '69 and '69, respectively. They sound like crap because of the turntable he had, but at least he had a good record cleaner (Dust Buster). I don't play them- they're past the point of no return but I did replace them. Those were real eye-openers for me, at 11 and 12 years old when he brought them home- still four of my favorites.
That is a nice collection for a 12 year old to listen to. Did you replace them as LPs or CDs or both? And I was 12 in 1967 and listening to 45s on my junk tt :)
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic General
And I was 12 in 1967 and listening to 45s on my junk tt :)
David, I was a couple years older and listening to my handful of LP's on my parents Stromberg Carlson console stereo in '67. I did have my 'phono player' for my 45's
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
David, I was a couple years older and listening to my handful of LP's on my parents Stromberg Carlson console stereo in '67. I did have my 'phono player' for my 45's
Yeah I guess I did listen sometimes on my parents rca console with a bad tt but my own was some kind of plastic tt. I was so proud when I graduated to a soundesign receiver with 8 track and phono in 1974. Did not realize that it still wasn't real hi fi. Didn't really get a real system until I was in the USAF in the late 70s. Thanks for the memories :)
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
If they sound the same, it's because they didn't use all of the frequency spectrum. I liked listening to that but if you listen again, you'll notice that the tracks closer to the end of the LP sides, the dynamics and frequency response are limited- this is because the inner part of the groove can't produce the same sound as the outer area. The surface passes at about 100 inches/minute at the beginning and only about 40 inches/minute at the end.

FWIW- I started listening with ear buds and started over by streaming through my Yamaha MusicCast, which sounds very good, IMO. I would think that the similarity of the LP and CD is intentional- Petty used to insist that his LPs not cost too much for people to buy and that didn't sit well with the record company and they had a lawsuit over a one dollar price difference. Making one format sound better than the other would have made one 'better', to many. The Petty recordings were very well produced and with Howie Epstein (RIP) as a co-producer, I think they taught each other a lot about getting the sound they wanted. Howie produced a good amount of music for others, some earning Grammy awards.

I cant tell the difference between the 2 formats in MOJO.. On another note, I agree with you that Tom Petty;s albums were all very well produced with the excepton of his very 1st album.. not bad but not in the same league as "Dam The Torpedos" .. His music always sounds fresh and never gets stale.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
That is a nice collection for a 12 year old to listen to. Did you replace them as LPs or CDs or both? And I was 12 in 1967 and listening to 45s on my junk tt :)
I bought both, eventually. Took forever for Court Of The Crimson King to come out on CD.

My friends & I would go to each others' house to listen to records and they usually played Donnie & Marie and other bubblegum crap but when we went to my house, I put one of these on and after a few minutes, they looked scared and asked if we could do something else, in a shaky voice. They didn't like The Doors, either but another friend did (he's about 6 months older) and he has gone on to win two Grammy awards, the most recent at the last presentation. He missed on the other nomination for composition, by John Williams. I guess if someone is going to lose to anyone, it's OK for the winner to be Williams.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Field Marshall
Believe it or not my first actual LP was Sounds of Silence by Simon and Garfunkel - just ok but when I bought the first CSN LP a couple of years later I was hooked! And I had discovered my first favorite band. Suite Judy Blue Eyes is still one of my favorite songs ever.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
I use a wet / vacuum method (VPI 16.5) with great results. While the majority of my LP's were bought new I do have a couple dozen that were bought used. All but a hand full cleaned up nicely, the others went to Goodwill.

One method for cleaning / restoring older records is the 'wood glue' method. Spread wood glue throughout and into the entire surface of the record, let it dry and remove.

I used the glue method but put it on thicker than shows in that video. It made a huge difference. It is a tedious affair, though, but I just did 3-4 at a time. Still had to put them thru the spin-clean to make the static go away. The glue treatment gives them enough static to raise the hairs on one's arms, but water wash cures it. I fixed some pretty trashed albums with it.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
This was my brother's record. He abandoned it. It ended up being one of my favorites. It wasn't all too popular with my friends so it didn't get much play other than when I listened by myself. It is probably why it is still essentially perfect condition. I do play it rather frequently, these days.

 
Bucknekked

Bucknekked

Audioholic Field Marshall
I used the glue method but put it on thicker than shows in that video. It made a huge difference. It is a tedious affair, though, but I just did 3-4 at a time. Still had to put them thru the spin-clean to make the static go away. The glue treatment gives them enough static to raise the hairs on one's arms, but water wash cures it. I fixed some pretty trashed albums with it.
I don't think I would ever have the courage to pour Elmer's on a record. But then again, there's a lot of things I lack the courage for. One of these days I'm going to get me one of those dust bugs like @TLS Guy suggests. So many little things to do. So little attention span.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I don't think I would ever have the courage to pour Elmer's on a record. But then again, there's a lot of things I lack the courage for. One of these days I'm going to get me one of those dust bugs like @TLS Guy suggests. So many little things to do. So little attention span.
Try it on an LP that's not in great condition, especially if you have already replaced it.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
I don't think I would ever have the courage to pour Elmer's on a record. But then again, there's a lot of things I lack the courage for. One of these days I'm going to get me one of those dust bugs like @TLS Guy suggests. So many little things to do. So little attention span.
These were records I had happily abandoned when CDs came out. I tried it on some I didn't care about so much. Ended up doing it to every noisy record I own. Now, they are actually back in maintainable condition, to where a once over before every use is enough to keep them sounding great again. Difference now being, I don't have roommates or a sig other, uncaringly helping themselves to them.

I also wash records with dish detergent and running water along with one of those micro-bristle paint edging tools. It works pretty good too, especially after the glue treatment, for a final, fine tuning. These methods may have their vinyl purity adversaries, but those people can hear things like cables or phono cartridges "burning in" too, so. . . .

ETA: I have the dust bug. My opinion of them is more 'meh' than 'yeh'. I have a kit called "Collector Protector" that works well. It is just easier for me to do the initial cleaning before, instead of fiddling with something else that attaches to the TT.
 
Bucknekked

Bucknekked

Audioholic Field Marshall
These were records I had happily abandoned when CDs came out. I tried it on some I didn't care about so much. Ended up doing it to every noisy record I own. Now, they are actually back in maintainable condition, to where a once over before every use is enough to keep them sounding great again. Difference now being, I don't have roommates or a sig other, uncaringly helping themselves to them.

I also wash records with dish detergent and running water along with one of those micro-bristle paint edging tools. It works pretty good too, especially after the glue treatment, for a final, fine tuning. These methods may have their vinyl purity adversaries, but those people can hear things like cables or phono cartridges "burning in" too, so. . . .

ETA: I have the dust bug. My opinion of them is more 'meh' than 'yeh'. I have a kit called "Collector Protector" that works well. It is just easier for me to do the initial cleaning before, instead of fiddling with something else that attaches to the TT.
As you know my existing collection of vinyl isn't all that big. I may have a dozen or so records and maybe two dozen at the outside. They are all literally brand new. My family decided I needed audiophile gifts and a record album is now the new tie for Christmas. So all my albums are literally new with no real wear and tear. I play them on occasion, but, for the life of me I just love my regular collection and the ease of play. Now that we've had this brief exchange of notes on the records I will probably go in and play one just because its on my mind. But the Love of Vinyl ship sailed a long time ago. Like many of our first marriages, it is mostly a mixed memory.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
As you know my existing collection of vinyl isn't all that big. I may have a dozen or so records and maybe two dozen at the outside. They are all literally brand new. My family decided I needed audiophile gifts and a record album is now the new tie for Christmas. So all my albums are literally new with no real wear and tear. I play them on occasion, but, for the life of me I just love my regular collection and the ease of play. Now that we've had this brief exchange of notes on the records I will probably go in and play one just because its on my mind. But the Love of Vinyl ship sailed a long time ago. Like many of our first marriages, it is mostly a mixed memory.
I can agree with that. I have maybe 70 albums left. Sometimes I get into them just to remember where I came from. These were treasures that I had to sacrifice things to get sometimes. Funny, that when I went to a local used music store recently, the owner remembered me from 30+ years ago at their other location, where I would often browse for hours. Some of the albums I still have, were already classics back then. The store wasn't usually crowded, so we could converse about the music while I searched.

I like my modern sources too. One thing that often puts me off is, remasters of old favorites. Sometimes they are done well, but often times they are not. Many of the original vinyl pressings have something the 'fixed' versions do not. I remember hating what Dolby NR setting inflicted on cassette tapes, to where I would rather hear the hiss. Seems that a lot of remastered albums end up filtering out a lot of the good, with the bad with similar compromises.

I'm not so crazy about modern vinyl trends, comparatively. If I use it, it's with the original TT and amplifier, analog controls, and every other flaw that may exist with it. To my ears, it makes a difference. There is some other habits that have returned as well. One being, I often used to stand to listen to music and physically interact simultaneously with volume and tone (EQ) controls on the fly for each album, or even song, in some cases. I love to listen like this and I had forgotten how immersive it can be. When I first got into audio, it was 'highly' social. Few years passed as we grew up and the hobby fell out of favor for most. That left me alone with my hobby and not having to be concerned with a great sounding room, or a large sweet spot. It's still like that. I just have to think of me and not so much about the room. This makes things so much less complicated and inexpensive.

 
MR.MAGOO

MR.MAGOO

Audioholic General
That’s the reason I still spin my Vinyl, I have LP’s that go all the way back to 1972. Can’t find some of the tunes on CD or streaming.
Reminds me, I should set up my extra turntable and try to convert these old LPs to digital. Comedy Caravan from 1957-ish, the others from early 1960's.

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Bucknekked

Bucknekked

Audioholic Field Marshall
I can agree with that. I have maybe 70 albums left. Sometimes I get into them just to remember where I came from. These were treasures that I had to sacrifice things to get sometimes. Funny, that when I went to a local used music store recently, the owner remembered me from 30+ years ago at their other location, where I would often browse for hours. Some of the albums I still have, were already classics back then. The store wasn't usually crowded, so we could converse about the music while I searched.

I like my modern sources too. One thing that often puts me off is, remasters of old favorites. Sometimes they are done well, but often times they are not. Many of the original vinyl pressings have something the 'fixed' versions do not. I remember hating what Dolby NR setting inflicted on cassette tapes, to where I would rather hear the hiss. Seems that a lot of remastered albums end up filtering out a lot of the good, with the bad with similar compromises.

I'm not so crazy about modern vinyl trends, comparatively. If I use it, it's with the original TT and amplifier, analog controls, and every other flaw that may exist with it. To my ears, it makes a difference. There is some other habits that have returned as well. One being, I often used to stand to listen to music and physically interact simultaneously with volume and tone (EQ) controls on the fly for each album, or even song, in some cases. I love to listen like this and I had forgotten how immersive it can be. When I first got into audio, it was 'highly' social. Few years passed as we grew up and the hobby fell out of favor for most. That left me alone with my hobby and not having to be concerned with a great sounding room, or a large sweet spot. It's still like that. I just have to think of me and not so much about the room. This makes things so much less complicated and inexpensive.

If you ever tire of that integrated amp or its two sidekicks, I have a spot all picked out.
Those are sweet. One of my greatest audio regrets is parting with my old Sansui integrated amp.
The thing is, I didn't have to. I was resting comfortably in a closet. Spring cleaning fever got me.
I have regretted that ever since. I had the matching tuner. Alas, the same fate.
We are but fools when young some times.
 

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