The popular Outlaw M2200 mono block power amp

How likely are you to buy this Monoblock?

  • 100%

    Votes: 2 7.1%
  • 50%

    Votes: 7 25.0%
  • 0% - I have no need for any more amps

    Votes: 9 32.1%
  • 0% - I might change amps, but not these amps

    Votes: 2 7.1%
  • 0% - I want to match my amps with Pre-pro and I don’t own an Outlaw Pre-Pro

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • What is a monoblock???

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • Already have one or more

    Votes: 6 21.4%

  • Total voters
    28
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Spartan
Nah. A few wire ties, a good power strip, and a little patience is all you need:


I’ve got slack behind the units with all cords pulled to center. Wire ties were every 6-8 inches. Just bundling those together was a huge help in my partial cable management plan. My long term goal after building a rack is to consolidate all power cords downwards and to the side closest to the outlet. All audio cables will go up and in the direction of their run. I’m tired of spaghetti parties behind my gear. Some is unavoidable, but...
;)


Sent from a handheld device using a silly little app.
Very nice n' neat looking Ryan. While getting to know you on these forums, I'm not even a little bit surprised. You seem very thorough.
 
2

2channel lover

Audioholic General
Right, the power cords might even be a deal breaker for me. I have an awful lot going on behind all my stuff already with cords and wiring. Tho it is just cool to show your buddies the "stack of amps" you have running your system. Plus just the whole idea of having "true" separates and the lower cost makes it very attractive to me.
Talk about wires and power cords...yes, it kinda matters (and my loft area is wired with 6 outlets, two of them are home run wired to a 20 amp breakers plus a 15 amp breaker for the lights and other outlets)...I've given thought to adding two more monoblocks just to round out the 5 channels with the same juice and clean up my atmos wiring....right now 3 are powered by the 5 ch amp and 1 by the whole house amp.

Aside from new music, I'm just not in spend mode right now...all of my little audio loose ends to tighten up everything are mostly just thoughts.
 
Alex2507

Alex2507

Audioholic Slumlord
We all know for many movies, the center channel draws more power than any other channels on average, so it makes sense for me to use the 200/300W/8/4 ohms M2200 for the center channel, the Anthem 225WX2 for the L,R and the M8003 for the surrounds and heights.
I was just getting around to wondering how different amps, thrown together like that, behave as you crank up the volume if their gain structures (is that what you call it?) are different.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Overlord
I was just getting around to wondering how different amps, thrown together like that, behave as you crank up the volume if their gain structures (is that what you call it?) are different.
For HT/Hi-fi application, you simply have to use power amplifiers with gain that matches to the preamplifier's output. That means it would be good practice to use a preamplifier that has output high enough to drive the power amplifier to deliver it's rated output plus a healthy headroom (3-6 dB I guess would be great, but that's just my opinion, ymmv). Other that that, for personal home use, I don't see a need to spend time on "gain structure".

If you want more, or say you do your own recording/mastering, here's an easy read at the minidsp.com website Gain structure 101.

Gain structure
The concept of gain structure is that, at each connection between components in the system, the signal level is as high as it can be (to minimize noise),but no higher than the maximum level that either component allows (so there is no distortion due to overload).

In the diagram below, the dynamic range of a music signal is indicated by a colored rectangle. The signal in red is too high, and will cause distortion. The signal in yellow is too low and the lower signals in the music are below the noise floor. The signal in green is "just right" and represents the ideal music signal level at that connection point. In an optimized system, each interconnection point would be "green" when the volume control is set to the maximum volume that you ever listen to.

Illustrating levels for gain structure

It's not generally necessary to compute exactly all of the gains and signal levels throughout a system - understanding the principles of gain structure is usually enough to achieve a good result. The following tips cover the key points for a DSP-based system.
 
Alex2507

Alex2507

Audioholic Slumlord
For HT/Hi-fi application, you simply have to use power amplifiers with gain that matches to the preamplifier's output. That means it would be good practice to use a preamplifier that has output high enough to drive the power amplifier to deliver it's rated output plus a healthy headroom (3-6 dB I guess would be great, but that's just my opinion, ymmv). Other that that, for personal home use, I don't see a need to spend time on "gain structure".

If you want more, or say you do your own recording/mastering, here's an easy read at the minidsp.com website Gain structure 101.

Gain structure
The concept of gain structure is that, at each connection between components in the system, the signal level is as high as it can be (to minimize noise),but no higher than the maximum level that either component allows (so there is no distortion due to overload).

In the diagram below, the dynamic range of a music signal is indicated by a colored rectangle. The signal in red is too high, and will cause distortion. The signal in yellow is too low and the lower signals in the music are below the noise floor. The signal in green is "just right" and represents the ideal music signal level at that connection point. In an optimized system, each interconnection point would be "green" when the volume control is set to the maximum volume that you ever listen to.

Illustrating levels for gain structure

It's not generally necessary to compute exactly all of the gains and signal levels throughout a system - understanding the principles of gain structure is usually enough to achieve a good result. The following tips cover the key points for a DSP-based system.
Ah ... that does clear things up some. Thanks.
 

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