The Audyssey MultEQ Editor app users thread (with facts and tips)

B

boulderskies

Audiophyte
thank you....will check out the video and go from there. scott
okay, watched the video above and it was good; this one provides more detail:
.
here's my main long-standing question:
i am primarily interested in dialing in my two subs (svs sb-2000 pro and rythmik f12) as tight and a deep as i can for my particular system and room. exactly HOW do i use the resulting graphs in the Editor to do that?????
scott
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
okay, watched the video above and it was good; this one provides more detail:
.
here's my main long-standing question:
i am primarily interested in dialing in my two subs (svs sb-2000 pro and rythmik f12) as tight and a deep as i can for my particular system and room. exactly HOW do i use the resulting graphs in the Editor to do that?????
scott
I suggest you would have to use REW to plot a bunch of graphs and do some analysis, before making adjustments, otherwise you will be flying blind to some extent.
 
B

boulderskies

Audiophyte
does anyone else have a more specific answer to my question?
thank you,
scott
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
I've finally got the calibrations sent to the receiver. I got hold of an old iPhone 6 with iOS 12.3 and it's worked using that. They possibly haven't updated the minimum specs (iOS 8) in the app store and it needs higher than the iOS 9.3 I have on the iPad (or the iPad just didn't want to talk to the receiver).
Anyway, if anyone has a similar "non-communication" issues with sending calibrations from Apple devices something to try would be using different devices and/or later versions of the iOS.
That's a VERY outdated version of iOS. It's up to 14 now and if your ipad is stuck on 9.3.5 I'm guessing it's a first gen. There could be a wifi incompatibility with your device. Maybe the receiver and ipad are on a different band? 2.4ghz vs 5ghz. I've seen that cause problems for other devices, but not my 4300 since it's wired.
 
D

DJ7675

Audioholic
Earlier in this thread there is some great "how to" info on using Audyssey with Ratbudyssey. If you don't want to go down that route, and just use the Audyssey app in a straight forward manner, the below may be a simple good way get things to sound good. This may or may not be helpful, so take it for what it is worth...

If you have good measuring speakers that you like, this is what I like to do to use the room correction as room correction...
-When going through Audyssey setup and setting the sub levels, set them as high in the "green" as possible. This will help give you headroom later on when you apply boosts to the sub trims
-Turn off midrange compensation
-Under speaker detection results results increase the crossover on the mains if they are set to less than 80hz to 80 hz. If they are higher than 80hz leave them alone
-In multeq filter frequency range- drag the curtains on all the speakers from 20khz to 300-1k (maybe experiment with 300hz/500hz etc). This will attempt to correct the affects of the room. Correcting above this range can have poor results if you are not confirming your results with REW.
-In the curve editor, go to the subwoofer (top right of the app select the sub) drop a point on 200hz on the zero db line. Drop a second point on 20hz and drag it up to +5db
-Send the configuration to your avr
-On your AVR, go under settings>speakers>levels and boost the sub level by the same amount you added to your sub curve. In this case +5. Because of how Audyssey works, you need to do this to keep the crossovers correct. If you boost your sub curve by 3db, add 3db of boost to the subwoofer speaker levels
-DEQ-If you add +3-+5 room curve and boost trim levels by the same amount you may not need DEQ. Try it with it off. If not enough bass, then change it to DEQ on and try it at reference level 15/10/5 until it feels like you have the bass you want at all levels
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
does anyone else have a more specific answer to my question?
thank you,
scott
Hello Scott, it did try to answer your question but now I can see that may be I misunderstood your question. You asked "exactly HOW do i use the resulting graphs in the Editor to do that????? " and your goal seems to be "dialing in your two subs as tight and a deep as i can for my particular system and room"

So I assume you want to achieve your goal by making adjustments to the target curve produced in your last Audyssey run. The video, starting at about the 8:00 mark showed you how to create your own customized target curve. The problems are:

1) the curve you see is mainly a target curve that Audyssey will try to achieve, but to see the actual results you need to use a 3rd party software such as REW, to plot more graphs using a suitable mic.

2) the curve/results the App show are not sufficient to tell you whether the two subwoofers would produce bass as tight and as deep as they possibly can in your room. So you really cannot achieve your goal by customizing the curve, and/or making other adjustments such as playing with the levels and distances etc. If you do you will basically be doing it by trial and error, and of course by ears.

If you look further back in this thread you will see all kinds of REW graphs others have posted, and it won't be just the frequency response graphs, there are others such as the impulse response, decay time, waterfall graphs that are helpful to guide you. Even then, there will still be some trial and error involved depending on how critical you are. The link article below may help:

Understanding Decay Time and Waterfall Graphs - GIK Acoustics

If using REW/mic is not possible for you then I would offer my short version answer as follow:

1) In my experience, if you follow instructions to the letter when running Audyssey auto setup, and make sure the room is in its quietest stage, it should be able to dial in your two subs nicely for reasonably "tight" (as it practically can be in your room) bass. And for deeper bass, you could simply customize the target curve using the App, by sloping it up towards from say 80 Hz to 20 Hz.

2) Set crossover to 80 Hz regardless, Audyssey may set your speakers to "large", or 60, 40 Hz, ignore them and set them to 80 Hz for the L/C/R, higher for the surrounds. That is, let the subwoofers take care of the deep bass without the chance of being messed up by the mains that may be capable of significant output at below 80 Hz.

Obviously my short version answer is only applicable if you trust Audyssey and your ears, as the results will be be visibly supported by "graphs".

If other know better ways, it would be great if they chime in.
 
Last edited:

newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top