Marantz SR6013 heating up room!

William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Ninja
Ratings
2,596 6 1
#42
My experience so far is that the amp units will generate a fair amount of heat when in use with eco off. Regardless of the speakers plugged in. The unit also maintains a standby temperature that’s around 78-79°f according to the thermostat of my AC Infinity unit. (If power is off completely to the unit, it will be stone cold.)
Given the avr market, there really is nothing I see available, without spending 2-3x more, that makes much difference In performance. So yes, maybe Yamaha runs cooler, and perhaps that is the ergonomic feature that is most important to you, but then I've also seen some people express some disappointment with other features. That said, @AcuDefTechGuy is a strong proponent for Yamaha.
My room is small, about 2000^3 feet, roughly 11x15' floor space. Without the fan unit on (running Audyssey measurements),I've seen the thermostat get up above 100ºf. Since I use amps on my main 5 channels, the only speakers currently connected to the AVR are the rears. ECO ON helps keep the temp down (as noted previously),and when coupled with the AC Infinity, I rarely see it creep over 81ºF while listening in Stereo. Maybe ~83ºF in full surround.

Some random thoughts: if you want to modify the interior cabinet walls, you could use a hole-saw to cut vent-holes which could have PC cooling fans set up to circulate air inside. You would need to ventilate cabinet doors, too, perhaps... so maybe not the best option.
If you own, you could modify the cabinet doors to have perforated metal screens added to the front. This would give better ventilation. A powder coating facility could do them up in white for you, too. :)
More drastic, if you own... get rid of those cabinets. :) Of course, I'm a bit of a minimalist, and all I wnt on my front wall is the TV and my speakers!

Good subwoofage will help take load off the amps, and actually contribute, perhaps to running a little cooler. I will always recommend having two matching subs... you do not need the biggest and baddest unless you want.

:)

Hope this gives some ideas for helping you brainstorm some other solutions.

Cheers!
Yeah cause Yamahas menus SUCK!!! Don’t like their proprietary crap either.
 
S

snakeeyes

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,229 1 1
#43
Should be open front side and open back side of cabinet and 4 to 5 inch above should be clear too. With Denon or Marantz you also need a usb fan on top to draw the air out.
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Warlord
Ratings
5,600 22 9
#44

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009CO543S/ref=psdc_11036291_t2_B009COQYA0#customerReviews
Install two of these on the sides of the projecting section of your cabinet. The link above shows different size options. Mount one low, blowing into the cabinet and the other high exhausting out of the cabinet (you can flip the fan in the mounting plate to reverse direction).Ideally, your AVR is on a shelf and you can drill some holes in the shelf so that the easiest path for the air is into the bottom of the AVR and out the top. Do what you can to direct the air through the unit.
 
fast fred

fast fred

Audioholic
Ratings
14
#46
Thanks for this!

If I decide to drill holes into cabinet, how big of a diemiter you think?
 
M Code

M Code

Audioholic General
Ratings
737 1
#47
Yup... The fans can help.. :rolleyes:
But the consumer should be aware of the audible increased noise levels from the fans & blade turbulence..

If the volume level is high enough it can mask the above noises, but in the end depends upon How quiet the listening room to begin with?

Just my $0.02... ;)
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,965 3
#48
If you choose to use a PC style fan (for Dawn's example, that appears to be what is attached to that louver in the Middle Atlantic fan),I would recommend going for the largest size you can fit...
If it were me, I'd look at 120mm fans... you can easily find super-quiet fans on the market, and controllers are easy to come by too. Options don't have to be limited to what's been discussed here, though specialized products do offer convenience of purchasing, and installation.

Seriously though, @fast fred ... at the point you are going to consider such modifications, I want to repeat my earlier question:
Do you own your home, or rent?
Is putting the AVR on top of the cabinet an option? Removing doors?

As mentioned previously, you need to intake low, and exhaust high. If you need to modify the shelf the unit sits on to allow for airflow through the unit, you need to account for weight on that shelf.

Beyond this... I am notorious for redundant planning and would argue that you should use a front venting AVR-top unit like what is offered by AC Infinity, and include in the setup, an intake fan at the bottom of the cabinet, and an additional exhaust fan on top. For a tight cabinet space, this is what I used:
https://www.amazon.com/AC-Infinity-Front-Exhaust-Receivers-Components/dp/B078PQJSRY
This unit has ports that will allow for controlling other fans, too, and again, in your situation, depending on the spacing in that cabinet and your concern for the heat, I would advise adding intake and exhaust fans to help out.

If you choose to not lock your electronics into the cupboard with closed doors, you can probably get away with just the set-top unit.

Blowing through electronics can be expensive. Trying to have warranty repairs done can also leave a bad taste in the mouth. I enjoy my Marrantz, even in spite of the issues I had getting the digital board fixed. :)

Hope this helps!
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,965 3
#49
Yup... The fans can help.. :rolleyes:
But the consumer should be aware of the audible increased noise levels from the fans & blade turbulence..

Just my $0.02... ;)
This is true, too! I agree. If I hadn't had to put my unit in a cabinet at all, I would likely have used a different cooling strategy. The only drawback to the T-10 is you can hear it. Its not so bad when music is playing, but quiet passages in movies or in your favorite Symphony will have an extra... whirrrr. *shrugs
IMO, its worth stretching the lifespan of the electronics.
And again, depending on how handy you are, how crafty you want to be, you may very well be able to find very quiet fans that can be used, but you would need to plan the system more carefully and do the build yourself to make an effective system

(My vote is still to remodel the cabinets right out of there! :p )
 
L

Leemix

Senior Audioholic
Ratings
150
#50
This is true, too! I agree. If I hadn't had to put my unit in a cabinet at all, I would likely have used a different cooling strategy. The only drawback to the T-10 is you can hear it. Its not so bad when music is playing, but quiet passages in movies or in your favorite Symphony will have an extra... whirrrr. *shrugs
IMO, its worth stretching the lifespan of the electronics.
And again, depending on how handy you are, how crafty you want to be, you may very well be able to find very quiet fans that can be used, but you would need to plan the system more carefully and do the build yourself to make an effective system

(My vote is still to remodel the cabinets right out of there! :p )
If you use auto and lowest speed on fans its very quiet, i have the rear venting one. This way its working well for me, the smart setting is a little more noisy and im very very sound sensitive at times.


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L

Leemix

Senior Audioholic
Ratings
150
#52
By design, the rear venting would direct additional sound away. :) Im going to switch to that unit after I build my rack! However... sadly, OPs cabinet dictates a different solution.
Yes it does but the top venting one has a different fan thats quieter then the rear/front venting ones.

Yes OP needs to air out the cabinet. And until thats sorted its a very good idea like others have said to atleast keep the front open when reciever is in use. (Im sorry we are repeating this so many times OP but its important and will save you a lot of money on replacements/repairs)


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AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
Ratings
8,307 23 6
#54
Yup... The fans can help.. :rolleyes:
But the consumer should be aware of the audible increased noise levels from the fans & blade turbulence..

If the volume level is high enough it can mask the above noises, but in the end depends upon How quiet the listening room to begin with?

Just my $0.02... ;)
I use fans too. I can’t hear them from that distance. :D

But you have a point regarding SNR. :D

So many people worry about THD and SNR, but how much NOISE will the fans add to the final audio signal that reaches the ears (even if the Noise is inaudible like many of the amp specs (THD, SNR, XT). :D

How do ambient NOISE and fan noise play into THD, SNR, XT, Damping Factor, etc.? :D
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Ratings
7,820 16 25
#57
You seriously need to rethink that installation. It is far too congested even with fans. You need more space around that unit, otherwise you will need a huge replacement budget.

You need a total rethink and reset here. That installation is a disaster and frankly a very bad installation.
 
MR.MAGOO

MR.MAGOO

Audioholic Chief
Ratings
383 10 11
#58
The owner's manual does caution about the 'hot surface', The unit probably has a small triangle on the case to show where the 'hot surface' is. This should be a clue that the unit needs adequate ventilation.


IMG_2101.JPG
 
M Code

M Code

Audioholic General
Ratings
737 1
#59
I use fans too. I can’t hear them from that distance. :D

But you have a point regarding SNR. :D

So many people worry about THD and SNR, but how much NOISE will the fans add to the final audio signal that reaches the ears (even if the Noise is inaudible like many of the amp specs (THD, SNR, XT). :D

How do ambient NOISE and fan noise play into THD, SNR, XT, Damping Factor, etc.? :D
EZ to measure. :rolleyes:.
  • Measure the noise floor with all electronics & fans off.
  • Run the electronics & fans, measure the noise floor without any source playing..
  • Now run the fans, measure again the noise floor with a source playing..

If the source is loud enough it will cover even the noisest fans..
We have done a far amount of research comparing different brand fans, surprising often blade turbulence is more noisy than the fan itself.. A lot of variables here such as blade pitch, motor bearing or bushing, type of smart circuitry for fan startup..
I guess here I am too old school... o_O
I don't like fans as they are often a short cut-costing method instead of having adequate heat sinking area. In my listening rooms, I prefer to have as much silence as possible so the audible audio is just the source content.

Just my $0.02... ;)
 
fast fred

fast fred

Audioholic
Ratings
14
#60
Probably not much since it’s just gonna be pushing the same air around. Is the back open at all? Did you try eco mode yet? Mine is almost the same temperature in eco as off. Surprised me really.
Also, you’ll get much better center channel performance by moving it to the front edge of the cabinet. You’re getting a bunch of interaction I’m sure.
What if I prop up the center instead of pulling all the way to the end of cabinet?
 

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