Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Nice, you're ready to 'rock & roll' , let the juices flow !!
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Yesterday, I drove it more. By the time I got home, my battery charge level was down to 29%.

So today, I started charging it up for the first time.

I admit I was a little intimidated by the 50 amp 240 volt capacity of the charger. That isn't trivial, but I have to admit I'm not intimidated by 15 amp 120 volt lines, such as any lamp cord. Both can deliver a fatal shock. I guess I was also bothered by the WiFi and Bluetooth hook up complexities.

As I suspected, starting the charger is a lot simpler than I was imagining. Plug the wall charger's cable into the car, and LED lights on both the car and the wall charger told me the system's status – it was waiting to begin. I spent about 10 seconds foolishly looking for an On/Off switch somewhere in the software, but there was none. You have to select On and Off times on a timer in the car's software. I set the On time for a minute later, and it began as expected. I guess, that's a safety feature. The charger's current doesn't start flowing until at least a minute after I take my hands off the car & cable.

Today, I started charging at 3:15 pm, and it will stop no later than 7 pm, if that much time is needed. In the future, I'll charge at night, from midnight to 8 am, when electricity rates are lowest.

I can monitor the charging progress by the car's app on my phone :). As I write this, it's 43% charged, with an estimated range of 120 miles.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Yesterday, I drove it more. By the time I got home, my battery charge level was down to 29%.

So today, I started charging it up for the first time.

I admit I was a little intimidated by the 50 amp 240 volt capacity of the charger. That isn't trivial, but I have to admit I'm not intimidated by 15 amp 120 volt lines, such as any lamp cord. Both can deliver a fatal shock. I guess I was also bothered by the WiFi and Bluetooth hook up complexities.

As I suspected, starting the charger is a lot simpler than I was imagining. Plug the wall charger's cable into the car, and LED lights on both the car and the wall charger told me the system's status – it was waiting to begin. I spent about 10 seconds foolishly looking for an On/Off switch somewhere in the software, but there was none. You have to select On and Off times on a timer in the car's software. I set the On time for a minute later, and it began as expected. I guess, that's a safety feature. The charger's current doesn't start flowing until at least a minute after I take my hands off the car & cable.

Today, I started charging at 3:15 pm, and it will stop no later than 7 pm, if that much time is needed. In the future, I'll charge at night, from midnight to 8 am, when electricity rates are lowest.

I can monitor the charging progress by the car's app on my phone :). As I write this, it's 43% charged, with an estimated range of 120 miles.
all good ! I had to laugh though at your intimidation of a '240 / 50 amp' circuit, you must not have an electric range ? that's the standard !!
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I have a gas stove. And years ago, when I had an electric one, I never connected or disconnected it. It was probably hard wired.

Anyway, my first recharge is done. It was simple. It got to 90% by 10 pm — a bit under 7 hours.

Tomorrow, I’ll get WiFi into the garage.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
now that I would change out, wiring too perhaps ?
Why? As long as the fuses and wire are sized correctly, the only other requirement, at least in the US, is that GFCI and AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters) are used, where needed. Well, and the feed wiring needs to be correctly sized and not operating at the rated maximum.

Another thing that isn't mentioned as often as it probably should be is the fact that the transformers and wiring between them and the users will need to be replaced in a lot of locations because of the increased demand.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
An update on installing a Level 2 car charger … I've made up my mind about what I'll do.
  • First of all, a car charger requires a 40A 240V circuit. I'll need about 100 feet of Romex to run from my main electrical panel in the basement to the garage. Some of that must go underground. Romex is now expensive, but the outdoor/underground grade hardly costs any more. (Thank goodness for small things.)
  • I'm going ahead with a new, larger, circuit breaker panel. There was really no choice about that. My old 30 slot panel is full, and if I want to add an EV charger circuit, I need a larger panel. The only choice was in how big a panel, and of what quality/price?
  • My detached & unheated garage can hold 2 cars. At present, I'll only have one charger for one EV. But why not equip the garage for the future possibility of two chargers? For one charger only, I could run Romex straight into the garage and terminate it with a standard 4 prong 240V plug (NEMA 14-50). Instead, I will have a circuit breaker sub-panel inside the garage with two circuit breakers for two 40A car chargers. The additional cost for Romex capable of that extra current was hardly much more – but the sub-panel is not cheap. For now, I'll have one car charger. In the future, I can easily add a second charger without any additional cost, other than the cost of the charger itself.
  • The work is estimated to take 3 days. The electrician & 2 assistants will start next Monday, when they'll replace the main panel. My electric power will be off that day. The next day or two, they'll install the line to the garage and the sub-panel switch box. As usual, the 3-day estimate is probably longer than needed. It may get it done in less time, 2 or 2½ days.
  • The car charger I ordered hasn't shipped yet. When it arrives, I can install it on a stud nearby the sub-panel & plug it in myself.
I won't discuss the price for all this. Suffice to say, it's not cheap. But neither is an EV. I don't want to generate posts informing me I could do this at a lower price – that's not my reason for this thread.

Having a Level 2 car charger must be thought of as part of the price of getting an EV. The cost of a Level 2 charger, plus the cost of powering it with a 40A 240V line is not small. But that cost can vary by a lot, depending on your particular circumstances. You must learn your own situation:
  1. Does your present circuit breaker panel have enough capacity for a car charger?
  2. If not, it must be replaced – or – it might be modified by adding a sub-panel.
  3. And finally, do you want to have only one car charger, or wire things for two chargers?
Of course, I'm thinking only what it takes for a single family house, or town house, with it's own garage or off-street parking. I'm not tackling what it might take for any other circumstances.
I'm sure your electricians are aware, but in addition to the new power feed to the detached garage, the requirements for ground stakes and using a bonding conductor have changed over the years. The pinheads who came here from Illinois didn't bother to do the service in my garage correctly, so it cost me, later.

Will they maintain power to the basic circuits, so you can use your HVAC, some lights and refrigerator?
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Tomorrow, I’ll get WiFi into the garage.
WiFi is now in the garage. It took a while with the new Google Home app, but it works. I linked the car charger to my WiFi, but I still couldn't link it to my ChargePoint account. That may not matter as I know I can now operate the charger through my car's software.

Thanks for the tip @BoredSysAdmin
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I'm sure your electricians are aware, but in addition to the new power feed to the detached garage, the requirements for ground stakes and using a bonding conductor have changed over the years.
Yes, new ground stakes were definitely done. It was in the contract, and I saw them getting driven in. I also remember reading about the bonding conductor in the contract. All the work was inspected and passed by a county inspector.
Will they maintain power to the basic circuits, so you can use your HVAC, some lights and refrigerator?
I'm not sure what you're asking. The HVAC, lights, etc. are in the house, not the garage. The detached garage, with no HVAC, was built with some inside & outside lights, two garage door openers, and a GFCI outlet. All are 120V 15A, on two separate circuits from the newly added heavy duty 240V 100A charger line.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I have a gas stove. And years ago, when I had an electric one, I never connected or disconnected it. It was probably hard wired.

Anyway, my first recharge is done. It was simple. It got to 90% by 10 pm — a bit under 7 hours.

Tomorrow, I’ll get WiFi into the garage.
Connecting a 240VAC device is no different from connecting a 120VAC device- don't touch the contacts on the plug and you'll be fine but if you do, make sure to avoid making contact with anything on the device that's grounded with any part of your body, don't stand in water and if you must stand on bare concrete in the even that you touch one of the spades on the plug, make sure your shoes don't conduct electricity. One spade=OK if it's the ground or you're not providing the ground, one HOT spade can be a problem.

In my garage, I have a table saw, welder and compressor that use 240VAC and when I plug them in, I never think about whether it's safe or not, other than making a habit of not touching anything that could be grounded with my other hand. The plugs are the kind that must be turned to lock them in place and the body of the plug is large enough that it would be very hard to touch the spades.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I'm not sure what you're asking. The HVAC, lights, etc. are in the house, not the garage. The detached garage, with no HVAC, was built with some inside & outside lights, two garage door openers, and a GFCI outlet. All are 120V 15A, on two separate circuits from the newly added heavy duty 240V 100A charger line.
I thought you wrote that the fuse panel in the house was being replaced and you would have no power for a day- if the temperature has dropped, they should at least allow you to heat the house and that's easy- marking the wires, removing the old panel and mounting the new one shouldn't take too long and they can connect the HVAC and fridge before anything else.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I thought you wrote that the fuse panel in the house was being replaced and you would have no power for a day- if the temperature has dropped, they should at least allow you to heat the house and that's easy- marking the wires, removing the old panel and mounting the new one shouldn't take too long and they can connect the HVAC and fridge before anything else.
Yes, the entire old 30-slot circuit breaker panel was replaced with a larger 42-slot panel. All electric power, including heat and refrigerator were off until about 4:30 pm that first day. The weather was typical November, cool but not cold. Sunshine helped. I also ran the gas fireplace at full throttle, making it warm enough on the first floor. We stayed out of the refrigerator as much as possible.

The electrician never suggested that he could do what you mentioned, but I never asked about that, and it wasn't a problem. The 2nd day's work was done with the power on, except for one brief moment.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
hey Swerd, wonder if your new 'hook-up' can handle charging this beast ?
I'd hope it could, but it might take several days – or weeks to charge up that Caterpillar truck. It certainly won't fit in my garage, and I wonder if my charger's 23-foot-long cord can reach it.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
I'd hope it could, but it might take several days – or weeks to charge up that Caterpillar truck. It certainly won't fit in my garage, and I wonder if my charger's 23-foot-long cord can reach it.
For that kind of heavy machinery, I wouldn't be surprised if 600 volt lines are used for more reasonable battery charging times.
 
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