j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
OMG. Saw a leak about the EV6 GT pricing in Australia @ $110k! This will mean similar pricing for the Ionic 5N. In USD that is about $74K, or roughly $20K more than the highest current model. Not out of my price range, but definitely more than I was looking to spend.
 
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William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Overlord
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Stellantis just brought back the 500e to the US because it had been selling well in Europe for them. I guess they aren't actually doing well overall.

Looks like we're getting closer to the Ioniq 5N also :)


If Kia/Hyundai introduce EVs, I just can't wait to see how many are stolen and crashed, which will produce some spectacular fires and tragic deaths. They need to yank their heads out of their asses and make those brands of cars harder to steal.
 
John Parks

John Parks

Audioholic Field Marshall
If Kia/Hyundai introduce EVs, I just can't wait to see how many are stolen and crashed, which will produce some spectacular fires and tragic deaths. They need to yank their heads out of their asses and make those brands of cars harder to steal.
If? They've been out for a while.
2023 Kia EV6 | All-Electric Crossover - Pricing & Features | Kia
2023 IONIQ 5 | Electric SUV, Overview | Hyundai USA
I really like the Kia model (better looking to me than the Hyundai).
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
If? They've been out for a while.
2023 Kia EV6 | All-Electric Crossover - Pricing & Features | Kia
2023 IONIQ 5 | Electric SUV, Overview | Hyundai USA
I really like the Kia model (better looking to me than the Hyundai).
I'm not going to pay attention to Hyundai/Kia as long as they don't do anything about their problem. I know people who own their cars/SUVs, but I'm not going anywhere near one. Not saying "never", though- everyone I know who has one loves it.
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Senior Audioholic
I read that if to cold, the batteries will not charge on a fully EV. I understand there were numerous complaints, but something to consider if you live in the north region of the US.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I read that if to cold, the batteries will not charge on a fully EV. I understand there were numerous complaints, but something to consider if you live in the north region of the US.
That's true for any battery, in or out of a car. When cold, they deliver less juice than when warm. We've all had trouble starting an internal combustion car on very cold mornings.

When I was in Alaska, I drove an air cooled VW. I got an electric battery heater. After about half an hour, it made a big difference.

Likewise, in EVs rechargeable batteries take on less charge when they're cold. And their driving range is less too. My new car has a way of diverting some heat from the heat pump into the battery compartment on cold days.
 
NINaudio

NINaudio

Audioholic Samurai
I read that if to cold, the batteries will not charge on a fully EV. I understand there were numerous complaints, but something to consider if you live in the north region of the US.
Nobody should be surprised that batteries struggle in cold temps. When your car won't start on a cold day is how most people find out their battery isn't up to snuff.

My coworker lost 10% charge overnight on his Tesla last week when we had wind chills in the -30's. He went to two Tesla charging areas, both of which had multiple non working charging stations, and said they were both graveyards of Teslas with drained and dead batteries. His battery ended up dying while waiting for a charging station to open up and he needed to have the car towed to Tesla.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Nobody should be surprised that batteries struggle in cold temps. When your car won't start on a cold day is how most people find out their battery isn't up to snuff.

My coworker lost 10% charge overnight on his Tesla last week when we had wind chills in the -30's. He went to two Tesla charging areas, both of which had multiple non working charging stations, and said they were both graveyards of Teslas with drained and dead batteries. His battery ended up dying while waiting for a charging station to open up and he needed to have the car towed to Tesla.
Wind chill shouldn't affect an inanimate object since it reflects how cold a person might feel, but it does make the object reach ambient temperature more efficiently. Garage it every time, if possible- the temperature in there is generally 10 degrees warmer than outside if the garage isn't insulated.
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Senior Audioholic
Can you jumper an EV to get it started??? If you live in colder climate with a gas powered car, you have the option to install a block heater too. Of course, when an alternator goes, that is a different tune.

How much does it cost to change out the batteries in and all EV, on the average? And what is the average life b/4 needing complete battery replacement?

We live in Wisconsin and I replace the car battery every 5 years with another premium one. If had to buy one this year, cost for my Optima replacement battery is about $300+
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Can you jumper an EV to get it started?
Not that I'm aware of. If there isn't enough juice left in the battery, a jump start wouldn't help. You need a partially charged battery to drive it – there's no alternator. That's why we must have home chargers for EVs.

I've also wondered if I could jump start an internal combustion car from my EV battery. Not that I'm aware of … and I've looked in the owner's manual. That's for a Volvo C40. If other EVs can do that, I wouldn't know.
How much does it cost to change out the batteries in and all EV, on the average? And what is the average life b/4 needing complete battery replacement?
A new battery in an EV would be very expensive. When I asked that same question, the answer was that I could expect an EVs battery to last as long as I could expect an internal combustion engine to last.
If you live in colder climate with a gas powered car, you have the option to install a block heater too.
I bought a cheap used VW when I was in Alaska. In the early 1970s, all VWs were air cooled. During my first winter there, all people I knew with liquid cooled engines also had those engine block heaters. If they plugged it in overnight, they had a working heater & defroster right away. On cold mornings, I envied that.

But I got very good at starting that car on the first try – I learned to keep it tuned up. I also got very good at cleaning all ice & snow off my windshield. I had to drive that car at least 30 minutes before I got any cabin heat at all. I tried using an electric oil pan heater meant for VWs, but even with 15W30 oil, it wasn't good enough. The battery heater worked much better.

One very cold day, I couldn't start the car, probably flooded it, and quickly drained the battery. I took it out of the car and carried it indoors. After several hours, it had warmed enough to start the car. That was my first lesson in what cold weather could do to a battery. After that, I bought the battery heater, good jumper cables, and a car battery charger.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
heat is the real killer of a lead acid battery, it's the demands of cold weather starting that ultimately kills it. Overcharging is another way to shorten the life
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Not that I'm aware of. If there isn't enough juice left in the battery, a jump start wouldn't help. You need a partially charged battery to drive it – there's no alternator. That's why we must have home chargers for EVs.

I've also wondered if I could jump start an internal combustion car from my EV battery. Not that I'm aware of … and I've looked in the owner's manual. That's for a Volvo C40. If other EVs can do that, I wouldn't know.
A new battery in an EV would be very expensive. When I asked that same question, the answer was that I could expect an EVs battery to last as long as I could expect an internal combustion engine to last.
I bought a cheap used VW when I was in Alaska. In the early 1970s, all VWs were air cooled. During my first winter there, all people I knew with liquid cooled engines also had those engine block heaters. If they plugged it in overnight, they had a working heater & defroster right away. On cold mornings, I envied that.

But I got very good at starting that car on the first try – I learned to keep it tuned up. I also got very good at cleaning all ice & snow off my windshield. I had to drive that car at least 30 minutes before I got any cabin heat at all. I tried using an electric oil pan heater meant for VWs, but even with 15W30 oil, it wasn't good enough. The battery heater worked much better.

One very cold day, I couldn't start the car, probably flooded it, and quickly drained the battery. I took it out of the car and carried it indoors. After several hours, it had warmed enough to start the car. That was my first lesson in what cold weather could do to a battery. After that, I bought the battery heater, good jumper cables, and a car battery charger.
15W30 ?? I think you meant 5W30 !
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Well, we're heading over to check out the grandkids new electric scooters, I'll report back on the effective range of those things ! ;)
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
15W30 ?? I think you meant 5W30!
Hey, that was nearly 50 years ago, 1973-75. It might have been 5W30, maybe even 5W20!

Winters in Anchorage were typically +10° to -10°F. There were some days where it got as cold as -25°. When it was that cold, I remember my tires got flat spots where they touched the pavement. As I started driving, those flat spots vibrated the car something fierce for a few minutes until the tires warmed up enough to roll smoother. I had to drive only about 4 miles to work.

I also just remembered a trick I learned in Alaska. Before starting the car, turn on your headlights for about 5-10 seconds. It was just enough to warm the battery a bit. But your battery had to be in good shape.

Ahh, the memories! With two winters of practice, I became very good at driving on ice & snow. And I laughed at people in Maryland who foolishly thought having an SUV with 4-wheel drive was all they needed to drive in snow.
 
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Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
yeah, back then 10W30 was the standard multi viscosity oil. To the best of my knowledge Amsoil was the first commercially available synthetic. I think 1972 ? I started using it in 1976 and have sworn by synthetic ever since
 

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