Quality outlet for dedicated 20 amp line?

TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Thanks, I'll try to hold off on that!
I don't think you have understood what I told you. The most impotent thing for powering powerful amps is the breaker. You absolutely should be installing a breaker with an HM designation for that Krell amp. These are called high magnetic breakers hence the HM designation.

I note that Home Depot sells them now.

You need to make sure that you get the right style of breaker for your panel. I have found that with high powered amps these breakers from Square D, made by Schneider Electric are crucial. Standard breakers other wise keep tripping in turn on.

So remember if there is not an HM in the serial number you will have trouble.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
From the Spec sheet, Power consumption:
Stand-by: 85W, Idle:430W, Max: 6kW
Compared to Crown DSi 6000, 1200W @ 8ohms (3kW into 2ohms) with Peak Power usage of 15.3A and idle of 180W
There is absolutely no reason to build an amplifier that outputs anything close to 1500W with a 120VAC power supply.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Even this might be silly overkill:
Not at all, six bucks for crying out loud ! cheap outlets (builders grade) are just that, cheap and over time their clamping force degrades.

Now this is overkill !!!


As for the Op running a dedicated line (20 amp, 10/2 wire) , just do it. You're talking pennies difference. Listen to TLS Guy's breaker recommendation and call it a day ...........
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
@TheWarrior

I have been depending on mine and I never disconnect it even with forecasted bad weather conditions or power interruptions

Since it has a relay which cannot be replaced, your recommendation of having a spare one is a darn good idea. I've just lost my best friend of more than 50 years, who had a H10 and a H15. I'm going to buy the H15 from his widow. As a matter of fact, I have the task of selling his two sound systems which consist of Altec speakers (A7 components, 604-8Gs etc.) 2 Marantz SR5012, 2 Audio-Technica turntables, 2 Revox tape decks one of which, I believe, is a half track 15 ips machine. Because of the current situation we are all in, I guess it's going to take at least 1½ to 2 years to sell the whole stuff.
 
Last edited:
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Thats why you use a sequencer knowing that the connected gear collectively has the potential to exceed the 1800 watt limit of a 15 amp circuit. The likelihood of all equipment using max rated power consumption at the sametime isn't likely but at 2600 watts you are definitely over and on paper have no more room for expansion.

One could argue that a 10% increase in wattage of high current drawing amps or AVRs are inaudible but its definitely objectively noticeable. Using words like period and bs aren't entirely accurate.

To quote a TV show of the 90s "More power Hugghh! Hugghh! Hugghh!"
First, manufacturer's bullshit isn't new. With the 10 channels on the QSC amps, at the volume I play the system, the output often exceed the 3 watt indication light, but none has ever reached the 30 watt light. Therefore, I still have room for expansion. Actually, it's the TV that draws the most power!
 
Last edited:
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
Gene suggests in his marantz sr8012 and denon x8500 reviews to use a 20 amp dedicated line. Which use 15 amp plugs.
Yes, those reviews by Gene were part of the reason why I became interested in getting a 20 amp line in the first place. I figured that if Gene could see a benefit with AVR/AVP, then perhaps I might perceive a benefit with this big azz Krell amp. Plus the fact that Krell says it should be operated on a 20 amp line.
 
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
I don't think you have understood what I told you. The most impotent thing for powering powerful amps is the breaker. You absolutely should be installing a breaker with an HM designation for that Krell amp. These are called high magnetic breakers hence the HM designation.

I note that Home Depot sells them now.

You need to make sure that you get the right style of breaker for your panel. I have found that with high powered amps these breakers from Square D, made by Schneider Electric are crucial. Standard breakers other wise keep tripping in turn on.

So remember if there is not an HM in the serial number you will have trouble.
Thanks, I will make sure to get that type of breaker. BTW, turning on my Krell has never tripped the breaker of the 15 amp line it is currently on. Now, it will dim the lights pretty good! Also, big transients in the sound will also dim the lights.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
@TheWarrior

I have been depending on mine and I never disconnect it even with forecasted bad weather conditions or power interruptions

Since it has a relay which cannot be replaced, your recommendation of having a spare one is a darn good idea. I've just lost my best friend of more than 50 years, who had a H10 and a H15. I'm going to buy the H15 from his widow. As a matter of fact, I have the task of selling his two sound systems which consist of Altec speakers (A7 components, 604-8Gs etc.) 2 Marantz SR5012, 2 Audio-Technica turntables, 2 Revox tape decks one of which, I believe, is a half track 15 ips machine. Because of the current situation we are all in, I guess it's going to take at least 1½ to 2 years to sell the whole stuff.
Oh wow, I am sorry for your loss!

Just to clarify: it is stated in the owners manual, but not in as big of letters as it probably should be: Do not change ANY plug connections while the H15 is turned on.

You know how sometimes the top yellow light is illuminated, and sometimes the lower yellow light switches on? That is the relay managing over/under current (line Boost and line Trim on the unit) in real time. By changing what is plugged in to the H15, while it is On, effectively causes wear to that relay. I try to always do that, but I know I'm guilty of being lazy and not wanting to wait for the full shut down and start up!
 
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
So, getting back to my choice of outlet, after some reading in this thread and elsewhere and speaking with my buddy who used to own a high end audio shop, my current thinking is to go with a Hubbell HBL5362. If anybody feels strongly otherwise, let me know and the reasons why. Thanks again for all the info.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
So, getting back to my choice of outlet, after some reading in this thread and elsewhere and speaking with my buddy who used to own a high end audio shop, my current thinking is to go with a Hubbell HBL5362. If anybody feels strongly otherwise, let me know and the reasons why. Thanks again for all the info.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D-QO-20-Amp-High-Magnetic-Single-Pole-Circuit-Breaker-QO120HM/303195929

TLS Guy shared the above product, and I would make sure you include this in the installation. An industrial outlet is most certainly not going to have any effect on sound quality, but that breaker will serve to protect your amp!
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Oh wow, I am sorry for your loss!

Just to clarify: it is stated in the owners manual, but not in as big of letters as it probably should be: Do not change ANY plug connections while the H15 is turned on.

You know how sometimes the top yellow light is illuminated, and sometimes the lower yellow light switches on? That is the relay managing over/under current (line Boost and line Trim on the unit) in real time. By changing what is plugged in to the H15, while it is On, effectively causes wear to that relay. I try to always do that, but I know I'm guilty of being lazy and not wanting to wait for the full shut down and start up!
I reside in a apartment building in the Montreal area, where most of the heating is now done with electricity, and we also have several industrial sectors. Most of the time, the voltage is around 120 volts, but it does go down to 115 at times and it got as high as 134 volts once. That was the reason for which I purchased the H15. I never regretted it. Apart from having a non replaceable relay, it's a very solidly built product, and even if it lasts only 10 years, it still represents a reasonable annual outlay.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
I reside in a apartment building in the Montreal area, where most of the heating is now done with electricity, and we also have several industrial sectors. Most of the time, the voltage is around 120 volts, but it does go down to 115 at times and it got as high as 134 volts once. That was the reason for which I purchased the H15. I never regretted it. Apart from having a non replaceable relay, it's a very solidly built product, and even if it lasts only 10 years, it still represents a reasonable annual outlay.
Crappy power grid in Laguna Beach CA and endless construction in GA. The Trim/boost lights switch all day long, and not in conjunction with HVAC cycling...
 
cornemuse

cornemuse

Junior Audioholic
My initial response was to expensive outlets. Not to 20 amp circuits. Also, you only need #12 wire for a 20 amp circuit. Run a #12 wire to (where you want it) & wire 2-3 boxes/outlets, enough to plug in everything you want. I have TV, cable box, stereo, dvd player, & 2 media players on one 15 amp circuit, going through one outlet box. (I use several '6 outlet power strips). In 30 years, I have never tripped that 15 amp breaker, this included in the past, crt TV, multiple vcrs, dvrs, etc. I think running two 15 amp circuits, (if you are adding them today), would be better than one 20 amp circuit.

my 2¢ worth, , , ,

-c-
 
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
I got an estimate from a different electrician for the 20 amp dedicated line, as well as one 15 amp dedicated line. The total for both is significantly less than the $700 estimate from the prior electrician for the 20 amp line only. What do you guys think about running one 20 amp line and one 15 amp line? Also, somebody said something about multiple lines being on the same phase. Would that apply in this scenario? Thanks much!

"ItemDescription Total Electrical wiring estimate per our walk-thru on 4/27/20 and as noted below:

Estimate -- Wire and install a 20amp 120volt circuit for Audio System. $360.00 NOTE: The high magnetic single-pole breaker and the Hubbell outlet will have to be ordered prior to scheduling this appointment.

Estimate -- Wire and install a 15amp 120volt circuit for electronics. $175.00

Total for both -- $535.00"
 
Speedskater

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
I'm not a fan of Leviton, they don't know the difference between a receptacle and an outlet, but a good hospital grade dual receptacle is about $25. Top shelf industrial receptacles are just as good and you don't get charged for the certification and they don't have the harsh cleaning chemicals plating.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Not at all, six bucks for crying out loud ! cheap outlets (builders grade) are just that, cheap and over time their clamping force degrades.

Now this is overkill !!!


As for the Op running a dedicated line (20 amp, 10/2 wire) , just do it. You're talking pennies difference. Listen to TLS Guy's breaker recommendation and call it a day ...........
If by 'clamping force', you're referring to the little holes with spring clips in the back of the outlet body, you shouldn't be using those, anyway! Use the screws- more surface area in contact with the wire and they don't lose contact unless the screws weren't tightened properly. Never back stab the wires in an outlet. BTW- if they lose tension, it's because they were overloaded and the heat caused the hardness of the clips to change.
 
Speedskater

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
The clamping force in the hospital grade spec, is about how tightly the cord plug is held.
 
newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top