Quality outlet for dedicated 20 amp line?

M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
Hi all, I'm going to have an electrician run a dedicated 20 amp line for my audio system and I want to purchase and have him install an audio grade, or hospital grade outlet. I don't know much about such outlets, but I've heard of Hubbell and Oyaide outlets. I plan to run Romex 10/2 wire to the outlet, if that makes a difference in which outlet can be used. Thanks for any suggestions/tips!
 
cornemuse

cornemuse

Junior Audioholic
20 amp outlet = 20 amp outlet. Go to homedepot, , , , What does 'audio grade' mean? Gold plated contacts? Hospital grade = more $$, same outlet.
 
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BoredSysAdmin

BoredSysAdmin

Audioholic Overlord
@cornemuse
Audio grade electrical outlet is a very real thing. It can be easily distinguished from plain boring outlets by listening closely to the sound of money getting counted by less than honest sellers of such equipment. /s
to op:
here's a relevant discussion on the "need" to have 20amp line:
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
I'd pay that electrician to run 2 or more 15 amp circuits so that their labor is worth paying for. Figure out a permanent location for all current and future electronics, amps etc and get enough additional 15 amp circuits to meet current and future needs.

There is no need for amplifiers that require a 20 amp circuit, making 10/2 is a waste of copper.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Hi all, I'm going to have an electrician run a dedicated 20 amp line for my audio system and I want to purchase and have him install an audio grade, or hospital grade outlet. I don't know much about such outlets, but I've heard of Hubbell and Oyaide outlets. I plan to run Romex 10/2 wire to the outlet, if that makes a difference in which outlet can be used. Thanks for any suggestions/tips!
I also would encourage more 15 amp circuits rather than a 20 amp. I do have a 20 amp circuit in my system that has three 250 watt per channel turn on at the same time for the front left and right speakers. However that by itself was not enough to stop the breakers tripping on turn on. To handle the in rush current, I had to install Square D magnetic shunt breakers. That was beyond the ken of the electrician, so that was one of the many items in my list to do.

They may be recommending 20 amp circuits because of in rush, but the best way to handle that is with magnetic shunt breakers.

There is nothing magic about fancy outlets. If it makes a good connection it will be fine. There is ignorant BS all over about funny outlets, funny AC cables and cables in general that is all ignorant superstition. If you can't measure it, it is not true, and the product of active imaginations. People claiming improved sound without data are con artists pure and simple.
 
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
I'd pay that electrician to run 2 or more 15 amp circuits so that their labor is worth paying for. Figure out a permanent location for all current and future electronics, amps etc and get enough additional 15 amp circuits to meet current and future needs.

There is no need for amplifiers that require a 20 amp circuit, making 10/2 is a waste of copper.
Well, Krell states that my FPB 400cx power amp "should be operated on a 20 amp circuit". This is why I'm getting a dedicated 20 amp line.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
Well, Krell states that my FPB 400cx power amp "should be operated on a 20 amp circuit". This is why I'm getting a dedicated 20 amp line.
Wow, full Class A huh? It should save money in the winter on your heating bill!

Seriously tho, if you're paying for an electrician, I would still have them run a couple 15 amp lines simultaneously for everything else now and in the future, especially since you're not going to want to have anything else plugged in to the 20 amp circuit. And it looks like you have quite a bit in your family room system - assuming that's where this is going.

Not sure if you're using any power protection, but I have been using APC H15's https://www.amazon.com/APC-H15BLK-12-Outlet-Rack-Mountable-Conditioner/dp/B000FBF08Q for my two 15 amp circuits as insurance against the fairly regular fluctuations I have in my area. There is an active relay that balances over/under current which is the wearable component and fails in 7-10 years according to APC (just lost my first H15 after 8 years, but all my amps work fine 8+ hours a day, so I find value in that peace of mind).

I thought APC made an H20 but I am sure you can find a similar product for the amp. Good luck!
 
BoredSysAdmin

BoredSysAdmin

Audioholic Overlord
Wow, full Class A huh? It should save money in the winter on your heating bill!
From the Spec sheet, Power consumption:
Stand-by: 85W, Idle:430W, Max: 6kW
Compared to Crown DSi 6000, 1200W @ 8ohms (3kW into 2ohms) with Peak Power usage of 15.3A and idle of 180W
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Wow, full Class A huh? It should save money in the winter on your heating bill!

Seriously tho, if you're paying for an electrician, I would still have them run a couple 15 amp lines simultaneously for everything else now and in the future, especially since you're not going to want to have anything else plugged in to the 20 amp circuit. And it looks like you have quite a bit in your family room system - assuming that's where this is going.

Not sure if you're using any power protection, but I have been using APC H15's https://www.amazon.com/APC-H15BLK-12-Outlet-Rack-Mountable-Conditioner/dp/B000FBF08Q for my two 15 amp circuits as insurance against the fairly regular fluctuations I have in my area. There is an active relay that balances over/under current which is the wearable component and fails in 7-10 years according to APC (just lost my first H15 after 8 years, but all my amps work fine 8+ hours a day, so I find value in that peace of mind).

I thought APC made an H20 but I am sure you can find a similar product for the amp. Good luck!
Couldn't you repair or have the H15 repaired? I have been using the same conditioner on my system for about 15 years without any hitch so far. Should I guess that I'm due for a failure any time?
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Well, Krell states that my FPB 400cx power amp "should be operated on a 20 amp circuit". This is why I'm getting a dedicated 20 amp line.
Does your Krell amp come with that special 20 amp plug? If it doesn't, you shouldn't need a 20 amp circuit if connected to a breaker. But, if your service panel uses fuses, then you would most likely need the 20 amp circuit connected with a 12/2 wire.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Ninja
Even this might be silly overkill:

Afterall, if it conducts electricity... :rolleyes:

If you are really worried about your outlets you should be more worried about the feed from the pole!
 
M

mtrot

Full Audioholic
Does your Krell amp come with that special 20 amp plug? If it doesn't, you shouldn't need a 20 amp circuit if connected to a breaker. But, if your service panel uses fuses, then you would most likely need the 20 amp circuit connected with a 12/2 wire.
Thanks, no. It has a regular plug. And there is a breaker box in the garage. But Krell does say it should be on a 20 amp circuit.
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
Just don’t fall for this crap...



“Truthfully speaking, it was as if a thick blanketed veil had been removed from my speakers and the level of musicality became much more detailed, sweeter, and shimmery.”

Holy hell.......
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Thanks, no. It has a regular plug. And there is a breaker box in the garage. But Krell does say it should be on a 20 amp circuit.
It doesn't come with a 20 amp plug, then it doesn't need one, period! It just needs a dedicated 15 amp circuit. Manufacturer's bullshit!
 
G

Grandzoltar

Full Audioholic
Gene suggests in his marantz sr8012 and denon x8500 reviews to use a 20 amp dedicated line. Which use 15 amp plugs.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Gene suggests in his marantz sr8012 and denon x8500 reviews to use a 20 amp dedicated line. Which use 15 amp plugs.
Unless you have other equipment drawing significant current when turned on simultaneously with a receiver, you should not normally need a 20 amp circuit. In addition, you could use a power sequencer or turn on some equipment one after the other.

In my HT system, I now have a Marantz SR5011 receiver used as a pre-pro, and 4 QSC DCA Series amplifiers with a total power rating of over 2600 watts, and with a 50" plasma TV which draws an average between 400 and 500 watts, all operating from a single 15 amp circuit. I use a power sequencer though but the 15 amp circuit is amply sufficient and I never tripped the breaker. This circuit also powers all the lights in the living room.

I stick to my opinion. If a piece of equipment comes with a the typical power cord with a 15 amp plug, it doesn't need a 20 amp circuit.
 
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G

Grandzoltar

Full Audioholic
Thats why you use a sequencer knowing that the connected gear collectively has the potential to exceed the 1800 watt limit of a 15 amp circuit. The likelihood of all equipment using max rated power consumption at the sametime isn't likely but at 2600 watts you are definitely over and on paper have no more room for expansion.

One could argue that a 10% increase in wattage of high current drawing amps or AVRs are inaudible but its definitely objectively noticeable. Using words like period and bs aren't entirely accurate.

To quote a TV show of the 90s "More power Hugghh! Hugghh! Hugghh!"
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
Couldn't you repair or have the H15 repaired? I have been using the same conditioner on my system for about 15 years without any hitch so far. Should I guess that I'm due for a failure any time?
Negative. The relay is not replaceable. It is a wearable component and if you've 1) been good about only changing connections to the h15 with it turned off (its an active relay, so changing the load during operation is bad) and 2) not live in area that has been under constant construction - then yes I could see going past the 7-10 years easily.

They're well made units, but they are expendable. Again, I treat them as my insurance for all the electronics. I'd rather toast a relay once a decade and have to buy a new one vs. damaging or reducing longevity to the rest of my equipment.

Mine gave no indication prior to failure, just the relay stopped functioning and lights flashed when I tried to turn the system on one day. Considering the current goings on.... yeah it might be nice to have a spare ready so your isolation is not interrupted!
 

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