Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
Former neo-nazi explains ... o_O

I'm not so sure about the former part but whatever.

 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Chief
QAnon is the future core of GOP, by the looks of it, and I used to think that the Tea Party was off the rails.....
 
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mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
And now on national news, Q supporters are calling 911 with their disinformation about the fires tying up 911.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Chief
And now on national news, Q supporters are calling 911 with their disinformation about the fires tying up 911.
Unclean assholes with no regard for other peoples lives.

Edit: Is it not a felony (federal or state) making prank calls to 911?
 
Kvn_Walker

Kvn_Walker

Audioholic Chief
Green's democrat opponent dropped out. She will be packing her bags, unopposed, to Capitol Hill.

mtg-fb-post.jpg


The future of the Republican Party...
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Yeah we have a lot of stories about "antifa" starting fires....we do have some arsonist assholes, but don't see the antifa connection at all from what I've researched. Just a scumbag white dude with a petty criminal record on one major fire particularly.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Full Audioholic
Um... people still believe pro wrestling is real.

Weekly World News was in print for almost 30 years.

UFO culture? Don't even go there :D

There's a portion of the population who are more inclined to believe things that are preposterous than those which seem reasonable.

Measles still prevails in the US because of a not insignificant number of our fellow citizens think vaccines are a method to inject Bill Gates microchips into the bloodstream.

Food for thought...
With regards to why people are inclined to believe conspiracies, here's an article asserting that it is (at least in part) human nature:

>>>“To one degree or another, we all have a disposition within us to view events and circumstances as the product of conspiracies,” says Joseph Uscinski, PhD, an associate professor of political science at the University of Miami. “If we have this disposition very strongly, then we will turn to a conspiracy as the explanation. Generally that explanation will accuse people we already don’t like.” Uscinski has a sea of data to back up this claim, and to show that conspiracism may be no more common today than ever — that in fact America was founded on a conspiracy theory. . . . There’s very little difference in conspiratorial tendencies based on liberal or conservative leanings, and likewise very little between Democrats and Republicans. That’s not to say ideology doesn’t play a huge role in conspiracy thinking — it just isn’t a good predictor of a person’s tendency to believe. <<<

The author gets into Qanon later in the article.

As I see it, if there are multiple explanations that are consistent with a given set of facts, people tend to latch onto a possible explanation that is consistent with their views without really considering whether or not the evidence points most strongly to that particular explanation (i.e. they don't really consider whether or not the explanation they've chosen to believe is the most plausible explanation). I would argue that conspiracies are just one form of confirmation bias.

 

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