chris357

chris357

Senior Audioholic
I think we're already in the mental health part of it and have been.

Totally agree with the more holistic approach to healthcare.

My doctor looked at me like I was crazy when I went in for a check up for the first time in 15 years or so. I'm 36, but haven't been to a doctor in a very, very long time. I don't get sick. Pretty much ever. I get the flu, it's a mild sneeze and a slight headache, everyone else around me feels like death.

I went to get labs just because I had no clue what my levels for anything were outside of blood pressure.

Get my results, nothing wrong with me. Everything in perfect order. Doctor still looks at me funny. Guess he's not used to people trying to be pro-active instead of reactive.

On a side note, right now would be a perfect time for you to buy life insurance.

Just saying ... BTW I sell life insurance :)
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
We have to think critically and remove emotion from this (this is for people in general) and rely on experts to tell us the best path forward. Don't let the fact that information may change sway you toward thinking the experts don't know what they're doing, that may just mean the experts learned something that mad them change their thinking.

Too many things in this country are centered on how it affects "ME" instead of how it affects "US". We don't think enough about each other, but instead focus on what we want and how it affects us if we don't get it. We've got to start thinking like a nation as a whole and not let this "personal freedom" nonsense get in the way of us coming out of this on the other side. Again, this is directed to nobody in particular, just venting.
Crime is up, violence (murder, Domestic Violence, Disorderly Conduct, armed robbery, carjacking), drug overdoses, extreme drunkenness and suicide have increased since this started and I constantly see people whining about not being able to see friends & family. The protests and riots are, IMO, directly connected to these feelings and personally, I think a lot of people need to start to think, rather than only feeling, when they make decisions. People who are prone to becoming extremely affected in some way (could be as simple as being brought to tears at the slightest hint of sadness all the way to explosive outbursts or violence) have issues that should be treated. People who were very sensitive before need to develop a 'thicker skin'. I can't imagine what would have happened at the start of WWII if people were as sensitive as they are now- I doubt the war would have gone the way it did.

I'm not saying that people should stop caring but I think they need to look at things differently- dealing with stress requires different thinking and one thing I have seen as a recommendation is "If you can't change it, don't worry about it to the point of losing control". Over-reacting to small, insignificant events is a major cause of violence and it can be something so simple as when someone gives a mean look at someone- this is sometimes called 'mean-mugging' and people have killed when it happened. That's just stupid. Another reason given is "He disrespected me". Boo hoo- I think people should give basic respect to someone they encounter for the first time, just as a measure of civility but beyond that, don't expect more. Respect is earned or lost, it should be assumed that someone receives a huge pile of it just because they exist but people really should think about this- the first time meeting someone, be a decent person. Be cordial, friendly, nice; whatever someone wants to call it. No need to bow and scrape, but be nice. Greet them in some way- say "Hi", "How's it going?", etc. Acknowledge them, don't just look away and make them think you're ignoring them, especially if you don't know them.

I don't want to be a court jester, but I like to make people laugh and it's better than the mood they may have been in at the time. It takes the edge off and I can't think of many people who don't need that right now.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
Crime is up, violence (murder, Domestic Violence, Disorderly Conduct, armed robbery, carjacking), drug overdoses, extreme drunkenness and suicide have increased since this started and I constantly see people whining about not being able to see friends & family. The protests and riots are, IMO, directly connected to these feelings and personally, I think a lot of people need to start to think, rather than only feeling, when they make decisions. People who are prone to becoming extremely affected in some way (could be as simple as being brought to tears at the slightest hint of sadness all the way to explosive outbursts or violence) have issues that should be treated. People who were very sensitive before need to develop a 'thicker skin'. I can't imagine what would have happened at the start of WWII if people were as sensitive as they are now- I doubt the war would have gone the way it did.

I'm not saying that people should stop caring but I think they need to look at things differently- dealing with stress requires different thinking and one thing I have seen as a recommendation is "If you can't change it, don't worry about it to the point of losing control". Over-reacting to small, insignificant events is a major cause of violence and it can be something so simple as when someone gives a mean look at someone- this is sometimes called 'mean-mugging' and people have killed when it happened. That's just stupid. Another reason given is "He disrespected me". Boo hoo- I think people should give basic respect to someone they encounter for the first time, just as a measure of civility but beyond that, don't expect more. Respect is earned or lost, it should be assumed that someone receives a huge pile of it just because they exist but people really should think about this- the first time meeting someone, be a decent person. Be cordial, friendly, nice; whatever someone wants to call it. No need to bow and scrape, but be nice. Greet them in some way- say "Hi", "How's it going?", etc. Acknowledge them, don't just look away and make them think you're ignoring them, especially if you don't know them.

I don't want to be a court jester, but I like to make people laugh and it's better than the mood they may have been in at the time. It takes the edge off and I can't think of many people who don't need that right now.
Well, one of the main reasons people are the way they are (especially when it comes to little things being treated as major) is that a LOT of people in this country haven't ever had to deal with any real issues at all. No difficult life decisions, no trauma, no abuse, nobody telling them how much they suck or that nobody likes them. Honestly, THAT'S A GOOD THING, but it's had some very odd drawbacks when people (parents usually) tell their kid they're "so wonderful" and that "everyone should like them" and all that other stuff instead of being real with them.

Not everyone likes everyone else. It's a fact. Not everyone thinks someone is great. I'm sure there's a few people that don't like Tom Hanks (those people are obviously wrong) and that's fine. People need to learn that the world not only doesn't revolve around them, but really doesn't care if they exist or not. People need to understand these facts and be prepared to deal with them. Coddling people and telling them they're great no matter what anyone else thinks is where this narcissism comes from. People need to understand that they, like everyone else, have flaws. That's fine. It's expected, and it should motivate people to work on those flaws instead of ignore to the point they become other people's problem.

Mental health in this country is vastly ignored and it's a big problem.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Well, one of the main reasons people are the way they are (especially when it comes to little things being treated as major) is that a LOT of people in this country haven't ever had to deal with any real issues at all. No difficult life decisions, no trauma, no abuse, nobody telling them how much they suck or that nobody likes them. Honestly, THAT'S A GOOD THING, but it's had some very odd drawbacks when people (parents usually) tell their kid they're "so wonderful" and that "everyone should like them" and all that other stuff instead of being real with them.

Not everyone likes everyone else. It's a fact. Not everyone thinks someone is great. I'm sure there's a few people that don't like Tom Hanks (those people are obviously wrong) and that's fine. People need to learn that the world not only doesn't revolve around them, but really doesn't care if they exist or not. People need to understand these facts and be prepared to deal with them. Coddling people and telling them they're great no matter what anyone else thinks is where this narcissism comes from. People need to understand that they, like everyone else, have flaws. That's fine. It's expected, and it should motivate people to work on those flaws instead of ignore to the point they become other people's problem.

Mental health in this country is vastly ignored and it's a big problem.
I'm not a fan of coddling kids- discipline is lacking in far too many households. While it would be great if people never had to deal with bad things/events, it's not likely, or possible.

Can you imagine people telling their kids "You suck, and here's why..."? :)

I don't mean they would say this to be mean, but if the kid does something incredibly bad, I think it's deserved.

Why would it be obvious that people who don't like Hanks are wrong? Is he perfect? I doubt it. Does anyone here know him well enough to say those people have no basis for their opinion?

As a kid, I would sometimes complain about not having something and my mom would say "If wishes were horses, then beggars could ride" and "I complained that I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet". Trust me- I was never allowed to think I was so special that I wouldn't receive some kind of discipline if I did something bad or wrong. I learned that people use others when they see a need and because of that, I came to the conclusion that in order for me to trust someone, they had to earn that trust.

Mental health has a terrible stigma, but in listening to a police scanner app, I have been hearing a lot of calls from a local mental health facility about people who are acting up/becoming badly agitated and claiming they want to do something about it. I have also heard a lot of calls to 911 about the same, from friends, families and individuals who are considering/threatening or have already done something to end it all. It seems that people are asking for help on their own, rather than always going to a secluded spot and being found by someone who doesn't need that kind of trauma.

Mental health facilities are out there, but many don't know about them or where they are.
 
NINaudio

NINaudio

Audioholic Field Marshall
You know who dies the fastest in retirement homes? The people who don’t have family or friends that visit them often. Furthermore it’s scientifically proven that people with more close friends live longer than those who don’t. I’m not anti mask or anti science, I’m simply pointing out in this current pandemic we’re kinda dammed if we do and dammed if we don’t.

For a theoretical physicist you’re not real smart.
We're a whole lot more damned if people don't wear masks.

I don't know what you expect me to do, guess everything you are? Your responses to most of my questions have been entirely cryptic and not at all very helpful. You say you're not anti mask or anti science but you also think only the oldest people should wear them, and even then that they should wear valved ones. That goes against what the vast majority of the scientific and medical communities says is best practice.
 
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davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Samurai
Good thing I'm basically a loner and ok with not a whole lot of social contact. It also helps that I'm retired and don't have to worry about a job. :)
 
M

Mr._Clark

Full Audioholic
I noticed that the North Dakota Health Department had been reporting that virtually every person who died from COVID-19 had "underlying health conditions." This struck me as being unlikely, so I emailed them and asked if "underlying health conditions" meant preexisting conditions, or if it included comorbidities caused by the virus (e.g. if a person with no preexisting conditions developed ARDS due to COVID and ARDS was listed on Part I of the death certificate, would this death be listed as being "with underlying health conditions"?)

I sent the email on October 22. To their credit, I received an email response the same day from an employee saying she forwarded the email to their epidemiologists for further clarification.

Low and behold, the state website included the following notice on October 26:

>>>INDIVIDUALS WHO DIED WITH COVID-19
To simplify and clarify messaging around deaths, we will no longer be reporting underlying health conditions. For more information on the change, please view the October 23 news briefing beginning at 40:48.<<<


The governor states in the briefing (to his credit) that they do not want people to assume that COVID 19 is not serious because a high percentage of people in the state have underlying health conditions.

The health department never actually answered my question, and, as far as I can tell, they never clarified what was meant by "underlying health conditions" in the prior reports. I suspect they were including comorbidities as "underlying health conditions" but I can't prove it.

Of course, I have no way of knowing if my email prompted the change.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
The health department never actually answered my question, and, as far as I can tell, they never clarified what was meant by "underlying health conditions" in the prior reports. I suspect they were including comorbidities as "underlying health conditions" but I can't prove it.

Of course, I have no way of knowing if my email prompted the change.
My first reaction was to respond to your post with a big grin and a LOL. In seconds, I changed my mind. Multiple deaths from an uncontrolled infectious disease is not funny. And watching an irresponsible state government dodge & weave, backtracking their statements, is also not funny. It quickly becomes a failure-to-be-re-elected risk, as well as a liability risk.

Dying from 'underlying health conditions' is like saying a patient would have recovered except for 'multiple organ failure'.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
My first reaction was to respond to your post with a big grin and a LOL. In seconds, I changed my mind. Multiple deaths from an uncontrolled infectious disease is not funny. And watching an irresponsible state government dodge & weave, backtracking their statements, is also not funny. It quickly becomes a failure-to-be-re-elected risk, as well as a liability risk.

Dying from 'underlying health conditions' is like saying a patient would have recovered except for 'multiple organ failure'.
This is just a single state, which leads to one to wonder if the official US death toll of 230,000 is a significant undercounting of the real total.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
This is just a single state, which leads to one to wonder if the official US death toll of 230,000 is a significant undercounting of the real total.
I have heard from reports over time that it is.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
And now Paris is self evacuating, it seems with the 2nd lock downs.



Was reading an interesting article in the current issue of Skeptical Inquirer about quarantines, etc. Had an interesting account of Typhoid Mary then other times when people were place in quarantine, even by force. And, here we are. People with short memory or none at all of history. I guess we had it good for too long that we forget.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
The Governor of WI recently said "Wear a freaking mask!" and all of the news stations report the new cases, total of cases and deaths, but the number of deaths still hasn't cracked 2000. It hit 1000 fairly early, but that may have been due to the way they were counted and COVID-19 was checked on many death certificates, even though the other health problems were the cause of death.

OK, I just found this link and it shows more deaths than the news outlets- why can I find this stuff and they can't???????

Negative tests far outweigh positive and so far, the deaths come to .9% of positive tests. They made all kinds of noise about how Milwaukee, Madison and the area near Green Bay were hotbeds, but 2031 deaths in more than 7 months doesn't equal the number of auto crash deaths (on pace to reach 599) + opioid-related deaths (245 in Q1, 325 in Q2 + a similar number in Q3), Milwaukee homicides (~175 so far, probably reach 200 in a few weeks) and suicide (850, so far). These amount to more than 2500 deaths, so far. The only two that were estimated are auto crash deaths and suicide- the rest are year to date.

WI COVID summary-


I'm puzzled by the death count here, when New York state has more than 20,000.

Then, there's this- if it's true, they need to be ground into a fine paste.

 
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T

Trebdp83

Audioholic Chief
I talk a mess at times and it's usually in good fun but I do not make light of health issues or those who are dealing with them. That being said, for f#%k's sake America! If more people gave a s#%t about what they put in their f#%kin' bellies, they could fight off s#%t like COVID-19. "I need to go get dinner. I hope the kid who hands me my food at the KFC drive-thru is wearing mask." What does it matter if your lungs are clean if your f#%kin' arteries are clogged? Heart disease is still the champ as the leading cause of death in America. It's like a Ford truck. It sucks, but it's still number one. "You f#%ker! Nobody talks s#%t about my truck or my fried chicken!"
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Samurai
Don't you people know that the death count is inflated so doctors can make more money? ;) Un effin believable.
 
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mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
Don't you people know that the death count is inflated so doctors can make more money? ;) Un effin believable.
My neighbor whom we have dinners with tells us similar comments about pills, etc, to make more money.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Field Marshall
My first reaction was to respond to your post with a big grin and a LOL. In seconds, I changed my mind. Multiple deaths from an uncontrolled infectious disease is not funny. And watching an irresponsible state government dodge & weave, backtracking their statements, is also not funny. It quickly becomes a failure-to-be-re-elected risk, as well as a liability risk.

Dying from 'underlying health conditions' is like saying a patient would have recovered except for 'multiple organ failure'.
actually I think in cases like that, to which there are many, COVID was a contributing factor, not necessarily 'the' cause of death. Regardless, where ever tomorrows death toll stands, it's sad and too damn high.
 

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