What is the Best Coffee Maker with a Thermal Carafe?

Dan

Dan

Senior Audioholic
Swerd gave a nice summary of things that matter and I agree so I won't elaborate. Here is what I think (mostly) doesn't matter although there are caveats.

Grinders: It highly depends upon your method of brewing. If you use the Melita (aka pour over method) into a cone with a filter the grind doesn't matter at all. Burr grinders can get very expensive several hundred dollars, and a blade grinder is cheap 20-30 bucks. What the burr grinder gives you is UNIFORMITY of the grind that a blade won't. If all the grinds are caught by a filter uniformity isn't very important. This included drip coffee machines and units like the Technivorm.

Grind does matter if you use a French press where you want a uniform coarse grind so you don't get too much sediment in you cup. It matter very much for the fancy espresso machines where you make a puck of grinds with a tamper for the water too go through. If the grinds aren't uniform or the puck is not evenly tamped, the water will find the path of least resistance and blow a hole in the puck rather than evenly pass through it. The result will be a poor extraction and a weak cup. I don't find this to be as much of a problem with the stovetop Moka type pots that are much cheaper and more commonly used. I don't have a fancy espresso maker but I am told that the expensive ones do make a better cup once you master the technique. For two grand I need a new receiver more than that.

Filters: Maybe you have a better sense of taste than I do but I can't taste the difference between paper and other fancy filters like gold. So true to from I go with cheap.

To reinforce Swerd's point briefly, I think the most important things are good quality beans freshly roasted 2-3 to 7 days prior, and water fresh off the boil for a good extraction of the oils that have the flavors. Most of the rest is individual preference.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Field Marshall
on the subject of coffee, what's a good burr grinder that you like ? My Shardor while it grinds A-OK the static electricity because of the plastic catcher drives me nuts. Thoughts on this unit ??

 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Keep trying. A small commercial roaster will have his own taste target, a style of roast level. It's not unlike a speaker designer's 'voicing' of his designs. They may also make several different blends to appeal to different customers.
Too bad your new coffee maker caused that power failure ;)!

That's why I still have my old manual drip coffee maker. With a hand-powered coffee grinder, a kettle, and a gas stove, I can always have coffee.
Well, I went and bought some coffee beans at a roaster's place. I was so confident that I would get fresh roasted beans, that I didn't ask to see or even taste a few beans. When I opened the bag at home, the beans were dry! When I buy some at Costco, at least they're oily. Fortunately, I had bought only 250 grams of a Brazilian/Colombian mixture. I'm going to call them tomorrow and tell them they've lost a client.

Next time I go to a roaster's place, I won't forget what to ask.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
Well, I went and bought some coffee beans at a roaster's place. I was so confident that I would get fresh roasted beans, that I didn't ask to see or even taste a few beans. When I opened the bag at home, the beans were dry! When I buy some at Costco, at least they're oily. Fortunately, I had bought only 250 grams of a Brazilian/Colombian mixture. I'm going to call them tomorrow and tell them they've lost a client.

Next time I go to a roaster's place, I won't forget what to ask.
Before you reject them, brew some of that coffee and taste it. You may not like the price, but at least give them a fair try. You may find those fresh roasted non-oily beans stay fresh tasting long enough to last the entire bag.

I know you like very dark roasted coffee, and that makes them get oily. But coffee beans that are oily on the surface when you buy them, are over-roasted. They quickly go stale and loose all flavor.

Also, the dark roast coffee you've bought at Costco may have been dry when they were first roasted, but with time they also became oily. Oily coffee beans are either over-roasted or have been stored too long. I think I've said that before, but it's worth repeating.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Of course. Don't be silly. I have several different power cords, different cords for African, Central American, or Asian coffees. I also use a dedicated 20 amp power line in the kitchen, with a gold plated hospital grade wall tap.

And yes, even my wife can taste the difference :rolleyes:.
Have you tried Sumatra? It's mellloooooooow.
 

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