What is different between a composite video signal sent by a DVD player, a VCR and a

U

Unregistered

Guest
What is different between a composite video signal sent by a DVD player, a VCR and a satellite receiver?

We can watch signals sent by our relatively old VCR (StarLite SVCR-7, from 1991) or by our newer satellite receiver (Samsung SCI-702E, from 2002) to our old TV set (SABA ST 25-1, from 1986) without any trouble using the scart (Peritel) connector in both cases.

However, we cannot watch those sent by our recently bought DVD player (CyberHome CH-DVD 412, from 2004) in the same TV set. The DVD player seems to work correctly, as its signal can be watched in other TV sets (using any of scart, composite AV and S-video connectors).

Which can be wrong or different with the reception of the (AV) signal from the DVD player (with respect to those provided by the VCR and the satellite receiver)?

Thanks a lot for any help.
 
U

Unregistered

Guest
Mu guess would be the format of the signal; ie PAL vs NTSC. Many players allow you to select the format or use 'auto' which attempts to figure it out for you.

If you are using scart, I think that is for PAL tvs. Might want to verify that the dvd player is set to output PAL.
 
U

Unregistered

Guest
Thank you for your suggestion. However, the player is behaving correctly with three other, more modern TV sets.

On its side, our old TV set is receiving correctly from a VCR and a satellite receiver, always using (composite video) scart connections.
 
U

Unregistered

Guest
TV display aspect was guilty

We eventually solved the problem yesterday evening using a 7-8 years old small TV set to check the DVD player setup, which resulted to come with Widescreen 16:9 display aspect preset. When we changed this setting to Normal/PS 4:3 (or to Normal/LB 4:3), we got the problem solved for our old SABA TV set, apparently built in 1985, probably before the Widescreen 16:9 display aspect ratio was introduced in TV.

Worth to be noted that the 16:9 ratio did not cause any trouble in the less old, small and also 4:3 TV set, probably because it was already prepared to identify and adapt 16:9 signals. We should appreciate opinions.
 
M

markw

Audioholic Overlord
Thanks for the feedback. I learned something here.

I never would have thought of that. Good sleuthing, Sherlock. ;)
 

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