sony str dh790 And setup (poor scots man)

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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
Holy molly I rest my case, the cheapest out both them is £399 compared to you guys being able to buy similar from parts Express for £100! I hate the UK lol maybe when we do our deal with old trumpet man we will get stuff from cross there cheaper
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
Holy molly I rest my case, the cheapest out both them is £399 compared to you guys being able to buy similar from parts Express for £100! I hate the UK lol maybe when we do our deal with old trumpet man we will get stuff from cross there cheaper
Similar isn't the same, those are likely better subs than the PE SUB1200....but what models/specs?
 
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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
XTZ SUB 12.17 is €645 = £600 = $550
elec New Gemini 2 10" £250 = $ 200+


So in terms of value for money I think there is room in the market for someone to open a parts Express over here and the above prices do not include shipping.

I know the guys on AV form here have clubbed together at times to try and get equipment from the US to try and cut down on shipping and taxes but it's rare to get everyone to order at the same time.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
XTZ SUB 12.17 is €645 = £600 = $550
elec New Gemini 2 10" £250 = $ 200+


So in terms of value for money I think there is room in the market for someone to open a parts Express over here and the above prices do not include shipping.

I know the guys on AV form here have clubbed together at times to try and get equipment from the US to try and cut down on shipping and taxes but it's rare to get everyone to order at the same time.
Your $ conversions seem off, using a current calculator UKP 600 is USD 775 or so.

XTZ is just now expanding presence in the US, only XTZ sub AH has reviewed is this one https://www.audioholics.com/subwoofer-reviews/xtz-subwoofer-review/measurements. The 12.17 is a far better sub than the PE SUB1200.

I'd compare the BK Elec Monolith subs to the 12.17 more than the Gemini but I'd say the Gemini is still likely a cut above the SUB1200.

I'd also rather have local support for warranty, etc than shipping from the US and losing warranty support....

Is DIY a consideration for you?
 
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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
No the BK is in Euros convert euros (touchy subject in the uk just now, brexit) to pounds to dollars.

Yes I was thinking about doing a DIY build but have to by the parts Express gear from Amazon or ebay and its expensive
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
No the BK is in Euros convert euros (touchy subject in the uk just now, brexit) to pounds to dollars.

Yes I was thinking about doing a DIY build but have to by the parts Express gear from Amazon or ebay and its expensive
I wasn't considering the euro price, was just concentrating on the UKP price to USD equivalent. If I convert UKP it's still a different conversion than you have....in the opposite direction even. I don't know if brexit affects that, but good luck with that mess....hope your "conservatives" have more fiscal sense than ours do....
 
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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
Your kidding our buffoon PM has not been seen and wants to build ludicrous infrastructure projects that will be obsolete in 3yrs time. And in my part of the country the SNP are still running around shouting Freedom, Scotland should be an independent country but also want to stay in the EU and be governed by the bureaucrats in Brussels.

It's a joke but you guys are suffering I believe? I say power to the people the world would be a better place if we got kids to run countrys.

There is far to much animosity and back stabbing in the world.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
I'm confused.com now :rolleyes: 80? Or full up to the max
Your speaker array is not full range barely getting into the 70 Hz arena; therefore, setting sub at 80 Hz, assuming the sub will produce tone up to 80 Hz smoothly, and also assuming your center and surrounds can be filtered at 80 Hz and mains at 60Hz, you will have a condition which will get you off to a good start with it all. You could also just set mains, center, and surrounds to receive full frequency and that would get you off to a good start too; but, speakers would then be producing tone into the subwoofer arena, which strains the amp and could produce some distortion. Also note, the higher frequency the sub is set to the more directional it will become; that's to say, bass will be heard as coming from the place where you've placed the sub, so setting the sub higher than 80 Hz could be problematic. And, setting sub at 60Hz is problematic too, since you then have a frequency hole between 60 and 80Hz which will make for a very strange listening experience. Now, even when you have it set up properly to sound great at an average listening level, you will still need to adjust bass volume when listening at low volume and as well at a high volume for the bass to fit in with higher frequencies. If you don't adjust at low or high volume the bass at low volume will lose its presence and at high volume it will overwhelm the experience. From reading your earlier posts it appears all you need to do initially is set mains to crossover/filter at 60Hz and set your sub to 80Hz, then, get the SPL meter out to match volume of speakers. That's it.
 
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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
So if I'm reading that correctly set my speakers at 80hz and sub at 80 and should be good.

Thanks
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
So if I'm reading that correctly set my speakers at 80hz and sub at 80 and should be good.

Thanks
Turn your sub crossover up as high as it will go then forget about it for the rest of your system's life. Let the avr decide (80 hz) how to implement the crossover.
 
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derekwatt5

Enthusiast
ok doke. But now i am really confused and i am going to tell you why. Here in the UK there is much debate around Brexit and that is the same situation with Dolby Atmos as i have now read that the atmos speaker modulus should be set to 150 - 200hz as per seemingly what Dolby suggest.

Can anyone confirm this? thanks
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
ok doke. But now i am really confused and i am going to tell you why. Here in the UK there is much debate around Brexit and that is the same situation with Dolby Atmos as i have now read that the atmos speaker modulus should be set to 150 - 200hz as per seemingly what Dolby suggest.

Can anyone confirm this? thanks
If you set the filter at 80 hz on your sub, then set the crossover at 80 Hz in your receiver you're double dipping. You have twice the filtering happening and it won't blend properly. That's why we say to turn it all the way up on your sub and let only the avr handle crossing over.
 
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sterling shoote

Audioholic General
If you set the filter at 80 hz on your sub, then set the crossover at 80 Hz in your receiver you're double dipping. You have twice the filtering happening and it won't blend properly. That's why we say to turn it all the way up on your sub and let only the avr handle crossing over.
He could set the sub to 80 with the mains set at 80; but, he's not double dipping. With sub set at 80 and mains running full frequency then he's double dipping.
 
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Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
He could set the sub to 80 with the mains set at 80; but, he's not double dipping. With sub set at 80 and mains running full frequency then he's double dipping.
The way it was explained to me is you're basically applying twice the filtering when you do that. That's what I mean by double dipping. Besides, turning the crossover all the way up on the sub won't have any negative effects at all so why not do it? That said...

I'll admit that I haven't tried or measured to test this theory so I can't say it with 100% confidence. Was it @lovinthehd who had posted about this? I don't remember...
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
He could set the sub to 80 with the mains set at 80; but, he's not double dipping. With sub set at 80 and mains running full frequency then he's double dipping.
The phrase is actually cascading filters. I'd not do it your way at all.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
The way it was explained to me is you're basically applying twice the filtering when you do that. That's what I mean by double dipping. Besides, turning the crossover all the way up on the sub won't have any negative effects at all so why not do it? That said...

I'll admit that I haven't tried or measured to test this theory so I can't say it with 100% confidence. Was it @lovinthehd who had posted about this? I don't remember...
Not just me, it's just generally recommended not to cascade filters (double applied low pass filters in this case). Here's what the AH setup article has to say:

"In almost all circumstances we recommend bypassing the subwoofer's internal bass management facilities in favor of the one found in your A/V receiver. You can do this either by engaging the LPF bypass switch (if available) or setting the crossover to its maximum setting (in the case of the Axiom EP800 pictured, that’s 150Hz).


There are several reasons for this:


  • Your A/V receiver does bass management in the digital domain making the filtering much neater.
  • Your A/V receiver typically has a better Low Pass Filter (LPF), typically 24dB/Octave ensuring your sub won’t be localized since the frequencies above what it was designed to produce will be attenuated better.

Failing to disable your sub's internal crossover can cause excessive losses in the subwoofers passband thus degrading the sound quality when used in conjunction with your A/V receiver's bass management facilities. This is especially true if the crossover frequency of both the sub's LPF and your receiver's bass management are set to the same frequency. This is called cascading crossovers and should usually be avoided.


Now that you’ve disabled your subwoofer's crossover, set the level to about 50% of max volume. We recommend setting the phase switch to 0 degrees or positive. You can revisit this later to see if the 180 degrees or negative setting sounds better in your system by having a friend flip the switch while you listen at the seated position to compare the two setting"
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
The way it was explained to me is you're basically applying twice the filtering when you do that. That's what I mean by double dipping. Besides, turning the crossover all the way up on the sub won't have any negative effects at all so why not do it? That said...

I'll admit that I haven't tried or measured to test this theory so I can't say it with 100% confidence. Was it @lovinthehd who had posted about this? I don't remember...
Turning the crossover all the way up on sub also assures "double dipping" when mains are running full frequency. Now, you can eliminate "double dipping" by setting sub to crossover at a point that mains are not able to produce low frequency, or you could set sub at highest crossover point and then set other speakers to small. These extreme means to get a result will not get a smooth result however because either the sub or mains/center/surrounds or operating at their limits. At any rate, in my system my mains can get down to about 40Hz and right now they're set to small to filter below 60 Hz, while my sub is set to filter above 60 Hz. I run all other speakers set to small to filter below 60 Hz too. I once had the surrounds and center filtering below 80 Hz but then the 80 to 60 Hz frequencies were essentially lost from those channels. Now there's no double dipping and mains/center/surrounds do not extend themselves to push into low bass arena. This scheme is accomplished via my OPPO 205 multi-channel bass management capability.
 
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