Has Dolby Home Atmos Been a Step Forward for Home Audio?

Do you think Dolby's Home Atmos hasbeen a positive move on the whole for home audio?

  • Yes, Home Atmos has been a move in the right direction.

    Votes: 30 46.2%
  • Dolby's Home Atmos has overall been good for home audio but has some flaws.

    Votes: 24 36.9%
  • Home Atmos has become a misbegotten mess for home audio.

    Votes: 8 12.3%
  • I don't know what a Dolby Home Atmos is. Help, I am lost and scared!

    Votes: 3 4.6%

  • Total voters
    65
VonMagnum

VonMagnum

Senior Audioholic
Quite frankly, you missed the whole point of my post. I didnt realize there were 34 channels in atmos but then again I was talking about AVRs. Since when do AVRs hold more than the skelteon? Turn on your critical thinking buddy and stop shooting from the hip!!!

I will ignore the rest of your troll response because I see your brain was disengaged when you wrote your response trying to be pithy and witty but you failed miserably. Everyone here knows how I feel about the cable industry. Im not sure how you missed it. I guess you read with your eyes closed.
You're the one that thought you would decide for everyone else in the world they don't deserve Atmos unless they can afford the "top 3" models. Such a ridiculous assertion from someone that clearly has no idea how Atmos works (it doesn't use "channels" but rather audio objects that are rendered to up to 34.1 speakers) deserves some old fashion sarcasm, IMO. And sorry, but I don't memorize what your or anyone else's cable preferences are. My account is slow loading/bugged as it is so I don't have time to read, let alone memorize everyone's preferences.

As for AVRs, some models are now offering up to 15.2 channels of Atmos through the new generation of DSP chips (typically for a 9.1.6 configuration of 9 speakers at ear level and 6 overhead plus at last one subwoofer). You need 11.1 channels to make a full "rectangle" of coverage (7.1.4). All the additional speakers are at intervals (typically around 50% give or take) in-between those pairs. That uses the regular 7.1 configuration plus two pairs of overhead speakers mounted at either +/-30-45 degrees (front and rear height, typically mounted above the screen or just in front of it on the ceiling and the same in the rear relative position) or +/- 45-55 degree (top front and top rear typically mounted ~1/4 the way into the room from the front or rear walls in or on the ceiling). There's also "Atmos enabled' (aka 'bouncy' speakers that try to bounce the overhead effects off the ceiling to sound like they're up there as they actually sit on top of the mains or somewhere similar (works best if hidden behind a TV so direct sound can't make it to your ears). I wouldn't recommend bouncy speakers.


If someone wants to hear Atmos go through its paces with something along the lines of that "Unfold" demo from Dolby, try Booka Shade's "Dear Future Self" Atmos music album on Pure Audio Blu-Ray. Their "Galvany Street Atmos Edition" Blu-Ray is also a great demo. It places sounds almost everywhere imaginable in the room front to back, side to side and across the ceiling and in-between.
 
T

Trebdp83

Audioholic Field Marshall
And the bass, don’t forget Booka’s bass.:p Some might think Virtualization is a joke but I like it enough that I put my Onkyo back in service after a week with the Yamaha. Something was missing so I switched em’. There were other issues, but that’s for another thread .;)
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
You're the one that thought you would decide for everyone else in the world they don't deserve Atmos unless they can afford the "top 3" models. Such a ridiculous assertion from someone that clearly has no idea how Atmos works (it doesn't use "channels" but rather audio objects that are rendered to up to 34.1 speakers) deserves some old fashion sarcasm, IMO. And sorry, but I don't memorize what your or anyone else's cable preferences are. My account is slow loading/bugged as it is so I don't have time to read, let alone memorize everyone's preferences.

As for AVRs, some models are now offering up to 15.2 channels of Atmos through the new generation of DSP chips (typically for a 9.1.6 configuration of 9 speakers at ear level and 6 overhead plus at last one subwoofer). You need 11.1 channels to make a full "rectangle" of coverage (7.1.4). All the additional speakers are at intervals (typically around 50% give or take) in-between those pairs. That uses the regular 7.1 configuration plus two pairs of overhead speakers mounted at either +/-30-45 degrees (front and rear height, typically mounted above the screen or just in front of it on the ceiling and the same in the rear relative position) or +/- 45-55 degree (top front and top rear typically mounted ~1/4 the way into the room from the front or rear walls in or on the ceiling). There's also "Atmos enabled' (aka 'bouncy' speakers that try to bounce the overhead effects off the ceiling to sound like they're up there as they actually sit on top of the mains or somewhere similar (works best if hidden behind a TV so direct sound can't make it to your ears). I wouldn't recommend bouncy speakers.


If someone wants to hear Atmos go through its paces with something along the lines of that "Unfold" demo from Dolby, try Booka Shade's "Dear Future Self" Atmos music album on Pure Audio Blu-Ray. Their "Galvany Street Atmos Edition" Blu-Ray is also a great demo. It places sounds almost everywhere imaginable in the room front to back, side to side and across the ceiling and in-between.
Still missing the boat sunshine? I dont give a flyin f?ck how atmos works. I do understand basic math. The more features you add despite keeping prices roughly the same as last years model or modest price increase, something has to be taken away to maintain price point. This leaves us with under achieving entry level and mid tier products whose noise specs and amplifier performance is teatering on the brink of barely acceptable. Be my guest and hop on the train of mediocrity. I don't want to be forced into going with separates because AVR manufacturers want to cling to latest and greatest over clean audio reproduction. Im not talking audiophile crazy clean but lets get the distortion figures back down to at least the mid 80s.
 
T

Trebdp83

Audioholic Field Marshall
Actually, Social Distortion, while around in the mid 80’s, had their biggest success in 1990. Wait, what thread is this again?o_O
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic Field Marshall
Here's what I know about ATMOS, nothing; yet, a demonstration of it at Best Buys was convincing. It convinced me I was in rain forest while it was raining, making me believe rain was falling upon me. Thinking then ATMOS would extend my movie pleasure in an upward direction, pun intended, I'm now now in the market for a new Pre-Pro to replace my 20 year old Sony TA-E9000ES. My game plan is the second tier Marantz Pre-Pro, an additional stereo amp, and the Klipsch bookshelf ATMOS directional speakers. This appears to be the most accommodating solution. What say you?
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Warlord
Here's what I know about ATMOS, nothing; yet, a demonstration of it at Best Buys was convincing. It convinced me I was in rain forest while it was raining, making me believe rain was falling upon me. Thinking then ATMOS would extend my movie pleasure in an upward direction, pun intended, I'm now now in the market for a new Pre-Pro to replace my 20 year old Sony TA-E9000ES. My game plan is the second tier Marantz Pre-Pro, an additional stereo amp, and the Klipsch bookshelf ATMOS directional speakers. This appears to be the most accommodating solution. What say you?
Are you meaning Dolby Atmos Enabled upfiring modules when you say “directional speaker”?
They are “theoretically” the easiest to implement since you don’t have to mess with high walls or ceilings. But, it can take some time to find the right angles to hit you in the couch.
If not those, then just curious what you meant.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
Are you meaning Dolby Atmos Enabled upfiring modules when you say “directional speaker”?
They are “theoretically” the easiest to implement since you don’t have to mess with high walls or ceilings. But, it can take some time to find the right angles to hit you in the couch.
If not those, then just curious what you meant.
I'll be honest, I'll probably get some up-firing modules to put on top of my towers in the office if my Onkyo ever dies. Why not? It'd be neat to compare the sound to my theater. Bouncy vs. in-ceiling.
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Warlord
I'll be honest, I'll probably get some up-firing modules to put on top of my towers in the office if my Onkyo ever dies. Why not? It'd be neat to compare the sound to my theater. Bouncy vs. in-ceiling.
I think that could make for a nice experiment. I mean since you have the real thing to compare to.
If you do, there should definitely be a thread!
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
I'll be honest, I'll probably get some up-firing modules to put on top of my towers in the office if my Onkyo ever dies. Why not? It'd be neat to compare the sound to my theater. Bouncy vs. in-ceiling.
Me too. My ceilings are all plastered.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
I think that could make for a nice experiment. I mean since you have the real thing to compare to.
If you do, there should definitely be a thread!
If I ever decide to (would require 4 atmos modules and a new receiver) then yeah, I'll start a comparison thread. I've never heard anything in Atmos other than in my theater so something new would be pretty neat.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic Field Marshall
Are you meaning Dolby Atmos Enabled upfiring modules when you say “directional speaker”?
They are “theoretically” the easiest to implement since you don’t have to mess with high walls or ceilings. But, it can take some time to find the right angles to hit you in the couch.
If not those, then just curious what you meant.
yes
 
10basetom

10basetom

Audiophyte
Atmos for home can be a decent proxy for cinema experience if you have the right ceiling, room shape, equipment, wall treatment, etc. The problem is only a small percentage of the average consumer will meet all of the requirements, so Atmos continues to wallow in "good enough" territory.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic General
I think the problem here is that your priorities are different. The vast majority are not looking for the best audio. You think that they would notice the difference when in fact they won't. I've lost count of the number of times I've entered a home to find the TV in vivid mode. What makes you think they will understand decent audio any better?
I’m not a big fan of atoms( atmos as I cannot afford -a new receiver with enough channels for a 5:2:4 system and my rooms too small I’d not be aloud to mount ceiling speakers . I’f it sounds better rats too bad zzz ... I’m stuck with a older receiver 7.2.

I been running my 1080 tv on high brightness hoping it could die to use my 55” sadly it’s not working I may just have to ask my annoying parents if I can just try out my bigger tv . Cable will look worse but it’s twice the 40” screen area ...
 
Gmoney

Gmoney

Audioholic Ninja
Maybe they should cut back on their drinking... :D
LMAO!, Man its post like this that makes Audio awesome!! I can't stop lmao!. You gotta have years in this hobby to get this post! lolo. Nicely done 3db, Go-NAD!
 
J

JoePa

Audiophyte
Dolby Atmos Five Years Later...
Mr. Larson...for me, your insights were right on the mark. I began building my second Theater in 2016 and completed it in 2017 (while I'm an amateur DYI'er, my first Theater in Georgia was featured in the June 2004 edit of the now-defunct Home Theater Magazine).

I didn't know about Atmos at the beginning of my project, which I completed in early 2017. It was to be a 7.3 system (yes .3!) and I was planning to have forward-facing front height speakers.

As I learned about Atmos and read their early whitepaper, I was able to fish speaker wire to add the .4 in-wall ceiling speakers at the Dolby-recommended locations, based on my primary viewing location, the front row of seating. I also lowered my four surrounds speakers and also went with in-walls so I could get the tweeters all at ear-height in the sitting position. The surround tweeters are also the same height as my L-C-R speakers.

Whereas Dolby had previously recommended the surround tweeters be about two feet above ear-height for .5 and .7 surround systems in the sitting position, for Atmos I assumed Dolby changed this recommendation to ear-height to enhance the Atmos overhead-effects.

Home_Theater_A-V_Equip_Layout_Labeled.png


sing Audyssey, I set up my 7.3.4 system and began enjoying my Theater.

The reality is, I feel I have to actively listen to the height effects. Scenes with rain falling overhead seem to provide the best Atmos experience, but for the most part, as Mr. Larson posits...it's a very minimal enhancement.

I tried a tweak about a year ago. I got into my A/V Receiver's setup menu and increased volume of the Atmos overhead speakers in increase their presence. It's a little better, but again, I still find myself having to listen for any momentary Atmos effects, like planes flying overhead.

Am I glad I have an Atmos system? Absolutely. Maybe there's a maturity continuum for this new technology? My hope is that the film sound mixes and the A/V channel-separation electronics will mature so that the overhead effects will become more present, even stunning, which is what I initially had hoped for.
 

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