For the love of god or whoever … VOTE!

Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
This appeal goes out to the very few on this site who believe it’s a waste of time to cast your ballot in the upcoming presidential election and future elections.

It’s been my pleasure to discuss civilly the difficult issues that face our great country at this time on this site with almost everyone, without resorting to personal insults, propaganda, wacky conspiracy theories or a blind belief in one party on another.

The sad truth though is that only 42% to 48% of eligible citizens vote in any given year, which is scandalous. Below is a chart (Wikipedia) showing the percentages for presidential elections since our founding. It’s even worse for local and state elections.
U.S._Vote_for_President_as_Population_Share.jpg


The good news is that it’s been slowly going up and we need this trend to continue.

We’ve all been in conversations or arguments with family, friends, and sometimes strangers, at one time or another, where the sad state of affairs in this country is discussed ad nauseam and rightly so. And I’m more than happy to engage with you, on one condition.

Do you vote? If so, let’s gab and solve all the problems. :D If not … shut up!

Do your civic duty and vote!


If not for yourself, do it for your family and loved ones and for those that can’t.

You have a voice, use it.

Sincerely,
Mom :p
 
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Gmoney

Gmoney

Audioholic Samurai
This appeal goes out to the very few on this site who believe it’s a waste of time to cast your ballot in the upcoming presidential election and future elections.

It’s been my pleasure to discuss civilly the difficult issues that face our great country at this time on this site with almost everyone, without resorting to personal insults, propaganda, wacky conspiracy theories or a blind belief in one party on another.

The sad truth though is that only 42% to 48% of eligible citizens vote in any given year, which is scandalous. Below is a chart (Wikipedia) showing the percentages for presidential elections since our founding. It’s even worse for local and state elections.
View attachment 40266

The good news is that it’s been slowly going up and we need this trend to continue.

We’ve all been in conversations or arguments with family, friends, and sometimes strangers, at one time or another, where the sad state of affairs in this country is discussed ad nauseam and rightly so. And I’m more than happy to engage with you, on one condition.

Do you vote? If so, let’s gab and solve all the problems. :D If not … shut up!

Do your civic duty and vote!


If not for yourself, do it for your family and loved ones and for those that can’t.

You have a voice, use it.

Sincerely,
Mom :p
Yeah this, don't wait till its to late. Cast your vote not just with Presidential elections. Start voting from the bottom up. Start with your Local area your state Representatives senators Governors.You don't start there? Than don't Expect things to change up at the Federal level.
 
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Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
For those who can't remember what day is Election Day, here's a simple little rhyme to help.
1601327801945.png
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
Well, I live in TX so it's not difficult to think my vote is wasted, BUT I just put my registration in the mailbox and wifey is already registered.

Yay us. Too bad we can't get mail in ballots.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
Well, I live in TX so it's not difficult to think my vote is wasted, BUT I just put my registration in the mailbox and wifey is already registered.

Yay us. Too bad we can't get mail in ballots.
Good for you. Vote is never wasted. What is wasted are the others who give up before trying.
This is a serious issue affecting all of us and for the long haul especially with the courts.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
Well, I live in TX so it's not difficult to think my vote is wasted, BUT I just put my registration in the mailbox and wifey is already registered.

Yay us. Too bad we can't get mail in ballots.
You may feel frustrated by voting against the majority in Texas, I get that. But the idea that your vote is wasted because you're in the minority is no different from what I hear in Maryland. Some people say "I'd vote Democratic, but I know this state is already a slam dunk for Biden. So why bother?"

You can't both be right. So hang in there and vote. If you don't vote, you can't complain.
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
Well, I live in TX so it's not difficult to think my vote is wasted, BUT I just put my registration in the mailbox and wifey is already registered.

Yay us. Too bad we can't get mail in ballots.
I understand your frustration and admire your tenacity. Good for you. Don’t let the ba$tards get you down and win.

The sad truth though is that on the whole some states, like Texas and many others, don’t want you to vote. They know in their hearts and conscience that they’re backing unpopular domestic and questionable foreign policies that in no way benefit you and your family.

As United States citizens we owe to ourselves, our children and theirs, to do our civic duty and make ourselves heard and stop this nonsense that’s engulfing our nation, as much as possible.

Vote in every election; local/state/presidential. Write to your local representatives in state houses, congress man/woman, senator and let them know that if they vote against your interests you will vote accordingly.

We need to be our own lobbyists.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
I understand your frustration and admire your tenacity. Good for you. Don’t let the ba$tards get you down and win.

The sad truth though is that on the whole some states, like Texas and many others, don’t want you to vote. They know in their hearts and conscience that they’re backing unpopular domestic and questionable foreign policies that in no way benefit you and your family.

As United States citizens we owe to ourselves, our children and theirs, to do our civic duty and make ourselves heard and stop this nonsense that’s engulfing our nation, as much as possible.

Vote in every election; local/state/presidential. Write to your local representatives in state houses, congress man/woman, senator and let them know that if they vote against your interests you will vote accordingly.

We need to be our own lobbyists.
Well, this year we're being called a purple state so people here aren't real happy with the way things are going right now. Especially when the talk of closing the border for trade. People don't realize how much we (Texas) trades with Mexico. You won't be taking our avocados without a fight.

Granted, we really still somewhat think of ourselves as a country within the US (I would bet a lot of states feel that way) so we don't like being told what to do. Just like the border wall (that we already had). Most of us weren't happy when the Governor decided to open up to make Trump happy. Our nice bubble of low cases exploded and we had to close again. That may have been what pushed people to the bluer side.

Granted, I could be making all that up, but it's how a lot of people I know feel.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
Granted, we really still somewhat think of ourselves as a country within the US (I would bet a lot of states feel that way) so we don't like being told what to do.
That Texas still thinks it's a country and not one of 50 states, is part of the problem much of the rest of the US has with Texas. Was it 1845 when Texas became a state? That was 175 years ago. Time to get over it ;)

When I was in the Navy, 1971-75, I met people from all parts of the country. Texans were widely considered insufferable by most everyone else. As always, there were some exceptions.

FWIW, the states I've lived in do not think they are a country. That includes Maryland, North Carolina, Alaska, and Connecticut.

After W was president, we asked Mexico if they wanted Texas back. They politely said No Thanks. You took Texas from us, fair & square. Now you deal with them.
 
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panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
That Texas still thinks it's a country and not one of 50 states, is part of the problem much of the rest of the US has with Texas. Was it 1845 when Texas became a state? That was 175 years ago. Time to get over it ;).

When I was in the Navy, 1971-75, I met people from all parts of the country. Texans were widely considered insufferable by most everyone else. As always, there were some exceptions.

FWIW, the states I've lived in do not think they are a country. That includes Maryland, North Carolina, Alaska, and Connecticut.

After W was president, we asked Mexico if they wanted Texas back. They politely said No Thanks. You took Texas from us, fair & square. Now you deal with them.
That's all true, but I was thinking more like CA when I was talking about other states being their own country.

We obviously have our issues here, but it just seems like people from other states come in and try to change us into what they left. Lots of CA transplants are like that. I've met plenty and don't get it. Why leave and complain about your former state, then complain about how the one you live in now isn't the same?

I get that there is a lot that needs to be done here especially about people in their little bubbles thinking everyone is just like them and if they aren't they should be. That's changing and a lot of people don't like it. I do. I want our communities to be more open, but I also want some of the nice things about where I live to stay the same.

Change is good, but let's not change EVERYTHING.
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
That's all true, but I was thinking more like CA when I was talking about other states being their own country.

We obviously have our issues here, but it just seems like people from other states come in and try to change us into what they left. Lots of CA transplants are like that. I've met plenty and don't get it. Why leave and complain about your former state, then complain about how the one you live in now isn't the same?

I get that there is a lot that needs to be done here especially about people in their little bubbles thinking everyone is just like them and if they aren't they should be. That's changing and a lot of people don't like it. I do. I want our communities to be more open, but I also want some of the nice things about where I live to stay the same.

Change is good, but let's not change EVERYTHING.
Californians are transient by nature. Almost a 1/4 are transplants from other states/countries I believe. I could be wrong ... its happened. ;)

A friend of mine spent close to 4 years there and couldn't come back to PA fast enough, after an earthquake in San Diego. He said it was the most beautiful state he'd ever been in but half the people were fruits & flakes. :D

Like Texas they've got their own vibe and that's good. The last thing we need in this country is 'group think'.
 
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KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
You won't be taking our avocados without a fight.

Most of us weren't happy when the Governor decided to open up to make Trump happy. Our nice bubble of low cases exploded and we had to close again. That may have been what pushed people to the bluer side.
Sounds like you need a custom bumper sticker:

Avacados/Covid Survival for 2020
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
Californians are transient by nature. Almost a 1/4 are transplants from other states/countries I believe. I could be wrong ... its happened. ;)

A friend of mine spent close to 4 years there and couldn't come back to PA fast enough, after an earthquake in San Diego. He said it was the most beautiful state he'd ever been in but half the people are fruits & flakes. :D

Like Texas they've got their own vibe and that's good. The last thing we need in this country is 'group think'.
You said it better than me. I think that's what it is. We have our vibe that's unique to us (for better or worse).

Funny thing is, @Swerd talking about the insufferable people from here reminded me of the type that started the "Trump train" where I live. If those are the folks that he's referring to, we don't like them either, but there are SO many of them Those are the ones that are holding our state back IMHO.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
That's all true, but I was thinking more like CA when I was talking about other states being their own country.

We obviously have our issues here, but it just seems like people from other states come in and try to change us into what they left. Lots of CA transplants are like that. I've met plenty and don't get it. Why leave and complain about your former state, then complain about how the one you live in now isn't the same?
It's possible that (some of) those Californians you met were unwilling transplants. They came to San Antonio because their jobs evaporated in California. That put them in a different position than if they chose to come to Texas.

Remember, it's all those non-Texans who come there for jobs who are also changing the voting and demographic profile of Texas. They are what's making Texas a politically purple state.
Funny thing is, @Swerd talking about the insufferable people from here reminded me of the type that started the "Trump train" where I live. If those are the folks that he's referring to, we don't like them either, but there are SO many of them Those are the ones that are holding our state back IMHO.
The first Texans I met was while I was in the Navy. They were young, inexperienced, and possibly nervous about their future in the Navy. Everyone shared that, especially in their first year. What was different about most of those Texans was how much they boasted & bragged about how much bigger & better Texas was than any other state. That got old real fast. The very first Texan I met who wasn't like that was in a Navy school in Pensacola, FL. He laughed when he told me he was from Texas, adding that he wasn't one of those insecure loudmouths who feared being away from Texas would cause irreparable harm.

A few years later, the Navy sent me to Alaska, where I spent 2 years in Anchorage, before getting out. In 1974/75 the Alaska Oil Pipeline was being built, a very big thing at the time. It brought many Texans to Alaska. All were in the oil pipeline construction business. They were generally obnoxious, especially to long term Alaskans. They couldn't stand the idea that Alaska was actually bigger than Texas. It was easy sport in Anchorage to bait these Texans into loud bragging.

I remember a common joke: How do you find Texas? Go east until you smell it. Then go south until you step in it.

I'm glad you didn't take any of my anti-Texas rant personally. I only ran into Texans while they were away from home. While it was easy to get a poor impression of Texans, it didn't really reflect on all those others who live there.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
It's possible that (some of) those Californians you met were unwilling transplants. They came to San Antonio because their jobs evaporated in California. That put them in a different position than if they chose to come to Texas.

Remember, it's all those non-Texans who come there for jobs who are also changing the voting and demographic profile of Texas. They are what's making Texas a politically purple state.
The first Texans I met was while I was in the Navy. They were young, inexperienced, and possibly nervous about their future in the Navy. Everyone shared that, especially in their first year. What was different about most of those Texans was how much they boasted & bragged about how much bigger & better Texas was than any other state. That got old real fast. The very first Texan I met who wasn't like that was in a Navy school in Pensacola, FL. He laughed when he told me he was from Texas, adding that he wasn't one of those insecure loudmouths who feared being away from Texas would cause irreparable harm.

A few years later, the Navy sent me to Alaska, where I spent 2 years in Anchorage, before getting out. In 1974/75 the Alaska Oil Pipeline was being built, a very big thing at the time. It brought many Texans to Alaska. All were in the oil pipeline construction business. They were generally obnoxious, especially to long term Alaskans. They couldn't stand the idea that Alaska was actually bigger than Texas. It was easy sport in Anchorage to bait these Texans into loud bragging.

I remember a common joke: How do you find Texas? Go east until you smell it. Then go south until you step in it.

I'm glad you didn't take any of my anti-Texas rant personally. I only ran into Texans while they were away from home. While it was easy to get a poor impression of Texans, it didn't really reflect on all those others who live there.
Nah, I like to think I know you well enough that you're just pointing out things that are true, not trying to offend.

Funny thing is, west Texas smells horrible. All of it for different reasons. It's either oil, or cow sh!t. Where I live, nothing like that at all.

Really, Texas is really multiple states smashed into one big one. I've lived everywhere except far east and they are all VERY different places. It's actually pretty crazy.

The loudmouth guys you talk about are the ones that are luckily the minority, but the vocal minority so everyone is aware. They're annoying and don't really represent all of us.

As for people coming for jobs, that was in the DFW area and yes, it was unwilling, but once they figured out how cheap things were compared to Cali, they stopped complaining (granted, where I lived in DFW was more like CA anyway so they were very much at home).

Everyone I've known that was born and grew up in Austin have been some of the nicest most accepting people I've ever met. Same with where I am now. Fort worth is like that too, but a bit more stereotypical. Dallas isn't at all. Hated living there.

As for the folks you met in Alaska, the oil folks are...different. I grew up in oil country around here and a lot of those people are just cocky and think they know everything when the truth is nowhere near that. It's a specific mindset that particular field attracts.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Spartan
As for the folks you met in Alaska, the oil folks are...different. I grew up in oil country around here and a lot of those people are just cocky and think they know everything when the truth is nowhere near that. It's a specific mindset that particular field attracts.
That reminds me of another joke I heard in Alaska. It wasn't about Texas or Texans, but where I heard it, in an Anchorage bar, it was aimed at a loudmouth Texan.

It was mid-summer in Anchorage. A few weeks earlier a local news story riveted everyone's attention. A grizzly bear had attacked and killed a back packer, a wildlife photographer and experienced out door's man, in the nearby mountains, about 100 miles away. While I was there, a grizzly bear story happened each summer. Nothing got people's attention like grizzly bear contact stories. In two summers, it was Humans 2: Bears 1. That's 2 bears were killed by humans and 1 human was killed by bears. I guess it wasn't so good for the bears.

The unfortunate photographer was alone in bear country, a bad idea. In his favor, he had filed a week long travel plan with the state park rangers. And he did carry a hunting rifle, a .30-06, not easy for a single camper.

Back to the bar. People were, of course talking all about meeting grizzly bears in mountain forests. Everyone in the bar, it seems, was an expert at what type of gun was the best to have if you ran into a bear. One of the loudest 'experts' was a Texan. He thought he had won the day, when an older gray bearded guy spoke up. He was an old-timer Alaskan, and seemed to know what he was talking about. He had a quiet voice, and everyone in the bar hushed up to hear him better, including the Texan.

He claimed the best gun for a bear encounter is a .357 Magnum revolver. Yes, that's right, a pistol. He added that you should prepare the gun before going out in the bush. File down that big ugly sight on top of the barrel, and smooth the end of the barrel with emory paper… Everyone wanted to know why?

That way, when the bear shoves it up your a$$, it goes in nice and easy.
 
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Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
And with a stroke of a pen ... this one.
montco pen.jpg

I have done my civic duty.

I wanted proof for my grandson that Nonno did his part, back in the day. :)

Relatively painless (1/2 an hour) and avoided the expected onslaught on Nov. 3rd at my polling station, here in Pennsylvania.

Vote! ... please.

You can make a difference!
 

Attachments

John Parks

John Parks

Audioholic General
And with a stroke of a pen ... this one.
View attachment 40826
I have done my civic duty.

I wanted proof for my grandson that Nonno did his part, back in the day. :)

Relatively painless (1/2 an hour) and avoided the expected onslaught on Nov. 3rd at my polling station, here in Pennsylvania.

Vote! ... please.
I voted yesterday. Like your experience, it was quite pain free - 20 minutes in-n-out, Texas style. Gave my "I Voted" sticker to my nine-year-old daughter. Apparently she was not impressed as I found stuck to my phone later on...
 

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