Does Film Maker Mode Marks Death to the Soap Opera Effect for UHD Displays?

How Do You Prefer to Watch Your UHD TV?

  • Directors Intent - No Motion Interpolation, No Soap Opera Effect

    Votes: 17 68.0%
  • Motion Enhancements for Sport Events, Directors Intent for Movies

    Votes: 5 20.0%
  • Give me Soap Opera Effect ALL the time

    Votes: 3 12.0%
  • Don't care, I'm still rocking a 40" CRT Display and S-VHS collection

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    25
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Chief
I don't even know what it is... lol.
Most TVs actually have it fixed , one older models lag every so often for soap opera and everything looks so fake .


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Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Chief
I don't even know what it is... lol.
Most TVs actually have it fixed , one older models lag every so often for soap opera and everything looks so fake .

4 years later and a Samsung 1/4 the price of my tv had hdr ::: Sony of 2015 is trash not saying the cheaper tv today is better though.
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Last edited:
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
My Sony 120 hz has no soap opera effect but sadly it’s not hdr .
O well haha it’s going to have to work for a long time .


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I wonder if your just used to it. Unless it was turned off, every 120hz display ive seen has it. Worst invention ever.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
I wonder if your just used to it. Unless it was turned off, every 120hz display ive seen has it. Worst invention ever.
I have any sort of frame interpolation turned off on all my LCD sets. My Panasonic has a 48hz and 96hz option and the 48hz one flickers like no tomorrow. The 96hz option doesn't really look any different from the original 24hz signal so I've got it on just to smooth out motion. Only TV I've ever seen where CFI (creative frame interpolation) doesn't look horrible, but it's also not an LCD.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Chief
I wonder if your just used to it. Unless it was turned off, every 120hz display ive seen has it. Worst invention ever.
I don’t see soap opera in any mode if my tv but like I’ve said before it’s not a. Good movie tv I’d dedicate it to non hdr gaming or Netflix imo that’s about all its good for .
You can’t turn 120 hz off of 4k tv , you can run off motion flow though thankfully ‘!!!
Smooth , standard, and true cinematic mode only good ones rest trash


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R

ray91962

Audiophyte
Refresh rate, measured in Hz, is the number of times your display can redraw the screen from top to bottom in 1 second, typically 60× per second (60Hz) or 120× per second (120 Hz) on modern TV sets. Frame rate, measured in frames per second (fps), is the number of separate frames your display is building (or rendering) in 1 second (a picture for your display to draw). Hz is a measure of speed, while fps is a measure of quantity. Without getting too technical, the dreaded "soap opera effect" is caused when duplicate frames are artificially inserted between the actual frames to smooth out the motion judder in low frame-rate content like films that are predominantly shown at 24 frames per second (24 fps). Refresh rate and frame rate do not directly cause soap opera effect. I'm not a videophile purist, but I believe including a separate "Film Maker Mode" with motion smoothing turned off automatically (in metadata) is a great way for movie buffs to watch a film the way it was meant to be seen by the director, not the TV manufacturer. You wouldn't want to read a book that had been randomly rewritten by the publisher, would you?
 
RichB

RichB

Audioholic Field Marshall
I voted for interpolation and I hate the soap opera effect because interpolation levels can be selected and it does help.
The problem with film maker mode is that they are dealing with maximum frame interpolation and ignoring the true goal which is to look like motion in 24Hz frame doubled cinematic presentation.

I have a Pioneer Kuro and LG 77C9 OLED and have compared them. Film Maker mode disables interpolation but makes it worse than some interpolation on the LG OLEDs. I use the globe scene in Star Trek into Darkness panning which at fist blush is awful on the LG. It is a little less awful on the Kuro. Neither one looks like the cinema. In the cinema, pans never jump, they are smooth and blurred. Kuro and LG jump (stutter) but the LG is worse (IMO) for two reasons. The LG is a sample-and-hold as opposed to very fast flashing refresh of the Kuro and because the LG is a much brighter. display.

The LG at frame interpolation (DeJudder) at 2-4 does have some smoothing but removes much of the jumping while preserving the blurring affect that is much preferred in 24Hz refresh.

So, no I will not be using Film Maker mode if added to my C9. It's my display so the film makers can Ricky Gervais off. :p

- Rich
 
T

Trebdp83

Junior Audioholic
And here I thought poor writing and casting were ruining today’s movies. I would prefer it if filmmakers cared about folks at home getting to use the full real estate of their UHD screens. With most viewing occuring at home, why not film in 16:9? Open up those IMAX scenes. Open matte them if they are at 1:85. I only go to the movies a few times a year and always have a look at the aspect ratio right off and usually think, "Darn, this will be letterboxed at home." Widescreen shows from Netflix and the like really get my goat. CinemaScope was brought about to get people out of the house and away from small 4:3 tv’s in the 1950’s. Things have changed. I would love to see more high frame rate films but that means techniques used for 24fps need to change as well.
 
P

Paul Mohr

Audioholic Intern
My LG C9 kind of has that option. If you select certain modes, like ISF Expert Dark it pretty much shuts all of that stuff off and has pretty accurate color settings. As for frame rate or whatever I guess that is a personal preferance for many, and it depends on what I am watching. If it is a movie I want to see it how it was shot. If it was filmed for 24 fps that is how I want to see it. If it was higher I want it to show at that rate. Same with the other settings on a tv, it depends on what I am watching. For movies I normally want it all turned off. However when watching netflix wiht older shows sometimes I turn some of the noise stuff on and add a hint of true motion since it is adjustable on my tv. It really cleans up some of the tv stuff that can be a bit grainy and old looking and make it look new. But like said, for movies I want them look how they did at release. If I am watching an old western or something shot on film I want it to look a bit grainy and look like it did at the theater when I watched it in the 70's. Same with an old horror flick. Or even a new movie if that how the director wanted it to look. If someone else doesn't though I could care less. You are doing it for your entertainment, do what entertains you. I personally don't like HDR. I think its way too bright and the colors don't look real to me. Looks like I am watching something on a best buy showroom floor. If others like it, great, more power to them. It is not different than me liking jazz and someone else liking speed metal or hip hop.

I feel the same way about screen resolution. Most movie theaters from what I can tell are 2K, 4K if you are lucky. And those screens are huge. Do we really think we need 4K on a 55 inch tv? I don't, but try buying a 1080p tv now. If you can find one it will probably be so cheap it will look like garbage. Resolution won't bit its issue lol. I still have an old 720p plasma that looks great with movies. Only draw back is its only 42 inches, which was big at that time.
 

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