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snakeeyes

Audioholic Ninja
I think these are the type you are talking about. Crimp is not really the right term, generally a crimp connection uses a crimping tool to bend/pinch the metal to capture the wire!

I use the Sewell ones pictured. They fit my Yamaha AVR and my Canton bookshelves and center.
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
Then I've just in the past found crimp as a description, and it fits since it self crimps/holds the wire in place. I'm not alone https://www.crutchfield.com/p_120CSBAN3/Metra-ethereal-Self-crimping-Banana-Connectors.html Anyways, I find them less reliable at holding wire than set screws....
Yeah, semantics are always difficult. I might speculate that my definition is "traditional," but calling screw compression "self-crimping" is an entirely reasonable description of how it works.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I had a neighbor that has done work on many of my vehicles, certified mechanic. I have seen his SnapOn toolbox in the garage, and likely the cost of his tools was approaching the cost of his house!

BUT.....SnapOn!
When I did car audio, only a SnapOn driver came to our shop and since so many of my Craftsman tools had peeling chrome, broken screwdriver tips, worn out sockets and open end wrenches that opened as they were stressed, I gave up and bought better. I had friends who owned a lot of truck tools and most preferred SnapOn which is technically a local company since I could drive to their HQ in less than an hour. I have dropped screwdrivers tip-down onto concrete without them breaking, but using a new Craftsman #2 Phillips to drive a screw into a pre-drilled hole fractured the tip and I wasn't in a position to really honk on it. That was the last time. The SnapOn driver showed up about five minutes later and those screwdrivers were my first purchase. I have a 1/4" swivel head ratchet that has been dropped onto concrete numerous times and I have even worked with it under water- never had a problem with it in over 30 years. No skipping, no peeling chrome, no dings, only slight scratches. I use them, clean them and put them away. My upper cabinet was used and I'm trying to sell it, but everyone wants it for nothing- while I agree that a cheap one holds tools as well as this one, it would be much harder to steal because it's so damned heavy and breaking into it would be much more difficult because the metal is much more stiff. Better drawer slides, too.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Good points!
I am at a point where my tool use is usually at home (or at a friend's house) where I will grab a tool bag and "kit it" for the specific task at hand.
One of the best things I did was buy sheets of business card blanks (for use with printer) and the business card magnetic sheets (adhesive on one side) like businesses send you in the hopes you will stick their cards on your fridge. These fit perfectly on the fronts of the drawers of my tool cabinets and I can easily shift them around when/if I reorganize my tools!
I use a label maker- the drawer in my SnapOn box that has pick tools, files and anything that cuts is called 'Death & Destruction'.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
I think these are the type you are talking about. Crimp is not really the right term, generally a crimp connection uses a crimping tool to bend/pinch the metal to capture the wire!

I see a similarity......

1600425284536.png


1600425231896.png
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
I don't know who wrote the details for those, but I fail to see how they 'crimp' the wire since they hold it in the same way a wire nut does.
Crimp can be defined as merely clamping a wire in place....like those style of bananas do without use of set screws. Easier to say crimp style than set screw-less style for me in any case.
 

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