yamaha rxv 685 screws giving small electricity shock

S

sand87

Audioholic
I think this is the problem though. I can be reasonably certain now that these units are wired for a two phase live supply and NO neutral. This is common throughout ASIA. India has stuck with its British heritage though with single phase and a neutral. This is most likely problem here as a result of a rogue "grey market" distributor. I suspect, in other words, his unit was not intended for the Indian market. May be bucksheesh involved as well somewhere along the line.
well dont know about the grey market stuff .the seller happens to be an authorized yamaha dealer and all products of yamaha intended for india is made in malasyia it seems.what bugs me though through this whole saga is that yamaha is missing in this whole equation.you have random yamaha technicians talking with not a single proper official detail about this.This is wat the seller too told me.he said he wants to follow this to its logical end and get to the bottom of it.
i will keep updating this thread as and when i keep getting info so that any buyer in india is properly informed before a purchase as it clearly seems that none from any other region is facing this issue.
btw i also read in an amazon india thread about a yamaha Nsw-50 i guess subwoofer having electric current on the screws on its back.so theres smthng going on here.
 
S

sand87

Audioholic
I think this is the problem though. I can be reasonably certain now that these units are wired for a two phase live supply and NO neutral. This is common throughout ASIA. India has stuck with its British heritage though with single phase and a neutral. This is most likely problem here as a result of a rogue "grey market" distributor. I suspect, in other words, his unit was not intended for the Indian market. May be bucksheesh involved as well somewhere along the line.
and dude your replies have been really informational.i knew that US and canada have a 110-120v supply and that probably europe relies on 220-230.but this has been an eye opener about the various differences even across asia.have to read up.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
and dude your replies have been really informational.i knew that US and canada have a 110-120v supply and that probably europe relies on 220-230.but this has been an eye opener about the various differences even across asia.have to read up.
OK.

Here is a list of countries.

Now those countries where you see 110/220 volts listed or 120/240 those countries are two phase no neutral at the higher voltage. So they can get 110 to 120 volts with a neutral but 220/240 volts with no neutral. This is because the transformer to the house is center tapped.

Actually the US is similar We are actually the same except that our receptacles are 120 volts with a neutral. Our larger appliances are 240 volts no neutral. These are things like water heaters, clothes driers and cooking stoves. With the exception of clothes driers these units are usually hard wired. The receptacle though looks completely different to the 120 volts ones.

However I see countries are making changes and most are going to 230/240 volts with neutral. I understand the Philippines are in the process of switching over with rural areas on the 110/220 volt system now.

So my guess is that your unit was actually manufactured for a country like Indonesia, that uses the system I describe. This could also be a packaging issue at the factory, with the wrong units in the wrong box. It is confusing as the voltage is the same, but in some jurisdictions there will be 220 to 240 volts no neutral while most will now have a neutral like India.

The list of countries on the 110/220 list is much shorter than when I last researched this a few years ago.
 
S

sand87

Audioholic
any Yamaha AVR user in india can u pls comment here and/or check this thing about electric leakage on the insides of the vents,screws on body and the usb port and on the other end of the aux cable once u connect it to the AVR or yamaha amplifier.Please comment.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
OK.

Here is a list of countries.

Now those countries where you see 110/220 volts listed or 120/240 those countries are two phase no neutral at the higher voltage. So they can get 110 to 120 volts with a neutral but 220/240 volts with no neutral. This is because the transformer to the house is center tapped.

Actually the US is similar We are actually the same except that our receptacles are 120 volts with a neutral. Our larger appliances are 240 volts no neutral. These are things like water heaters, clothes driers and cooking stoves. With the exception of clothes driers these units are usually hard wired. The receptacle though looks completely different to the 120 volts ones.

However I see countries are making changes and most are going to 230/240 volts with neutral. I understand the Philippines are in the process of switching over with rural areas on the 110/220 volt system now.

So my guess is that your unit was actually manufactured for a country like Indonesia, that uses the system I describe. This could also be a packaging issue at the factory, with the wrong units in the wrong box. It is confusing as the voltage is the same, but in some jurisdictions there will be 220 to 240 volts no neutral while most will now have a neutral like India.

The list of countries on the 110/220 list is much shorter than when I last researched this a few years ago.
US has three cables to a residence- two opposite phases and a neutral, with the ground provided at the service entrance. New dryer power cords have four wires, but can be made to operate on three, one being the ground. The only difference between the neutral and ground is that the neutral is supposed to be used as the negative reference for single phase devices that don't have a grounded chassis. NEC makes the distinction by calling the neutral the 'grounded conductor' and the bare or green wire the 'grounding conductor'.

This begs a question, because I have seen European plugs and receptacles, but haven't worked with them- assuming the third pin is grounded, what happens if resistance exists on its path, either at some junction or at the breaker panel? Since resistance would cause a difference in potential between earth and other equipment, it seems that the shock would be proportional to the voltage present.
 
S

sand87

Audioholic
this is the plugs image of my yamaha rxv 685.a N ont he left and a S on the right and some f1 and D in between..

i tried connecting the device to another well grounded home and there too this device has electricity over it.

Also my sony tv which again is a two pin has a very little electric current on its metal parts and on the connectors like av2 etc when i took a tester and tested it.

looks like without ground every device has it and probably thats wats happeneing in the case of the avr too.am just loudly thinking here.
 

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