What do you think about what's gong on at the Capital??

M

Mr._Clark

Senior Audioholic
To paraphrase: "The Idiocy Of Evil".

The goals of the boogaloos are (apparently) very similar to those of Bob Mercer, an early Trump supporter.

From the Atlantic article:

>>>“They [boogaloos] want Rome to fall,” she said. “They want chaos to bring it down.”<<<


Here's a clip from a New Yorker article about Bob Mercer's role in Trump's rise:

>>>“Bob thinks the less government the better. He’s happy if people don’t trust the government. And if the President’s a bozo? He’s fine with that. He wants it to all fall down. . . Until Election Day in 2016, Mercer and Hanley—two of the richest men in America—paid Caddell to keep collecting polling data that enabled them to exploit the public’s resentment of élites such as themselves.” (this quote is someone else's impression of Mercer, but it seems consistent with everything else I've heard about him)


https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/27/the-reclusive-hedge-fund-tycoon-behind-the-trump-presidency
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
The goals of the boogaloos are (apparently) very similar to those of Bob Mercer, an early Trump supporter.

From the Atlantic article:

>>>“They [boogaloos] want Rome to fall,” she said. “They want chaos to bring it down.”<<<


Here's a clip from a New Yorker article about Bob Mercer's role in Trump's rise:

>>>“Bob thinks the less government the better. He’s happy if people don’t trust the government. And if the President’s a bozo? He’s fine with that. He wants it to all fall down. . . Until Election Day in 2016, Mercer and Hanley—two of the richest men in America—paid Caddell to keep collecting polling data that enabled them to exploit the public’s resentment of élites such as themselves.” (this quote is someone else's impression of Mercer, but it seems consistent with everything else I've heard about him)


https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/27/the-reclusive-hedge-fund-tycoon-behind-the-trump-presidency
How nihilistic can a person be?
 
M

Mr._Clark

Senior Audioholic
Axios has an interesting series about Trump's last days in office. Here's a snip from Episode 4:

>>>Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

White House counsel Pat Cipollone and a few other aides in the room were shocked Barr had come out and said it — although they knew it was true. For good measure, the attorney general threw in a warning that the new legal team Trump was betting his future on was "clownish."

Trump had angrily dragged Barr in to explain himself after seeing a breaking AP story all over Twitter, with the headline: "Disputing Trump, Barr says no widespread election fraud." But Barr was not backing down. Three weeks later, he would be gone.<<<


 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Axios has an interesting series about Trump's last days in office. Here's a snip from Episode 4:

>>>Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

White House counsel Pat Cipollone and a few other aides in the room were shocked Barr had come out and said it — although they knew it was true. For good measure, the attorney general threw in a warning that the new legal team Trump was betting his future on was "clownish."

Trump had angrily dragged Barr in to explain himself after seeing a breaking AP story all over Twitter, with the headline: "Disputing Trump, Barr says no widespread election fraud." But Barr was not backing down. Three weeks later, he would be gone.<<<


After such an exchange, I'm surprised it took three weeks.
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
If true, this is very sickening and how could this woman & her partner not be prosecuted?
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
If true, this is very sickening and how could this woman & her partner not be prosecuted?
Agreed and if found guilty, bring out the firing squad !
Intent and doing so are two different things. They might be able to get her on a smaller charge but that's about it.

I'm also getting tired of these exaggerated sentences some want for what amounts to 'people taking a tour' of the capitol. The penalty is still much more than had they done so on a neighbor's private property. Community service, 3 months, a year for trespassing etc. I'm not talking about the violent rioters, intent to kill, or the organizers. That's something the feds will have to decipher.
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
Intent and doing so are two different things. They might be able to get her on a smaller charge but that's about it.

I'm also getting tired of these exaggerated sentences some want for what amounts to 'people taking a tour' of the capitol. The penalty is still much more than had they done so on a neighbor's private property. Community service, 3 months, a year for trespassing etc. I'm not talking about the violent rioters, intent to kill, or the organizers. That's something the feds will have to decipher.
I agree, to a degree.

Obviously there’s more to this story than the FBI is letting on at this time, since they leaked the story I’m assuming.

But ‘IF’ true, she should be prosecuted for treason, which by the law of the land reads …

§2381. Treason. Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States. (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 807; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII, §330016(2)(J), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title18/part1/chapter115&edition=prelim

There’s quite a bit of play in the statuette for a federal judge and jury to consider in sentencing anyway, again ‘IF’ true. I highly doubt she’ll be brought in front of a firing squad as Mikado desires, unless Pelosi’s laptop had highly sensitive encrypted secrets, which I doubt, and she knew it, when she offered to pass it along to a Russian national, which I also doubt.

Whether we believe the law on treason is just or not is inconsequential at this time, be it for a regular citizen, law enforcement personnel, a congressman/woman, Senator … or dare I say it, the president of the United States, as some former intelligence heads, in his administration, have brought up in a public setting. His interactions with Russia and Putin have also been very troubling, before and after he was elected president, which he was warned about repeatedly by his own staff, member’s in the Cabinet and intelligence officials.

There’s no use of having a law decree on the books for treason, if it’s not going to be enforced. FULL STOP.

Willful violence is one thing, not that I believe that the insurrectionists should be let go with a slap on the hand and a promise not to do it again, but her possible willingness to pass along the laptop to an adversarial foreign power, like Russia, as I said, is very troubling.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Field Marshall
I agree, to a degree.

Obviously there’s more to this story than the FBI is letting on at this time, since they leaked the story I’m assuming.

But ‘IF’ true, she should be prosecuted for treason, which by the law of the land reads …

§2381. Treason. Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States. (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 807; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII, §330016(2)(J), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title18/part1/chapter115&edition=prelim

There’s quite a bit of play in the statuette for a federal judge and jury to consider in sentencing anyway, again ‘IF’ true. I highly doubt she’ll be brought in front of a firing squad as Mikado desires, unless Pelosi’s laptop had highly sensitive encrypted secrets, which I doubt, and she knew it, when she offered to pass it along to a Russian national, which I also doubt.

Whether we believe the law on treason is just or not is inconsequential at this time, be it for a regular citizen, law enforcement personnel, a congressman/woman, Senator … or dare I say it, the president of the United States, as some former intelligence heads, in his administration, have brought up in a public setting. His interactions with Russia and Putin have also been very troubling, before and after he was elected president, which he was warned about repeatedly by his own staff, member’s in the Cabinet and intelligence officials.

There’s no use of having a law decree on the books for treason, if it’s not going to be enforced. FULL STOP.

Willful violence is one thing, not that I believe that the insurrectionists should be let go with a slap on the hand and a promise not to do it again, but her possible willingness to pass along the laptop to an adversarial foreign power, like Russia, as I said, is very troubling.
It's my understanding that to convict someone for treason for spying when not at war with that country is not possible. For instance Julius and Ethel Rosenberg was convicted for espionage and sentenced to death, but not for treason.

I seem to recall that the Founders wanted a strict criteria for treason as opposed to what could be considered treason in England at that time.

 
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Trell

Trell

Audioholic Field Marshall
Some Democrats have said that they saw some Republican(s?) giving suspicious tours to visitors the day before the deadly assault on the Capitol. At that time they did not name anyone, but they demanded investigations.

As of now it appears one Republican is outed, pending criminal investigation, of course. This is the same woman that refuses to go past metal detectors erected after the assault:


"Amid a push to investigate whether any GOP lawmakers aided rioters at the Capitol, several Democrats last week accused an unnamed House Republican of leading groups on “reconnaissance” tours of the building before the Jan. 6 attack.​
Now, two Democratic lawmakers say they personally saw one Republican — Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado — with a “large” group in a tunnel connected to the Capitol days before the attempted insurrection that left four rioters and one police officer dead.​
Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) said on Monday that he and Rep. John Yarmuth (D-Ky.) had both seen Boebert in the tunnel outside the Cannon House Office Building with a group sometime in the three days before the riots. He said he didn’t know who was in the group or if anyone with Boebert later participated in the attack.
“Congressman [John] Yarmuth refreshed my recollection yesterday,” Cohen told Jim Sciutto on “CNN Newsroom.” “We saw Boebert taking a group of people for a tour sometime after the 3rd and before the 6th. … Now whether these people were people that were involved in the insurrection or not, I do not know.” "​
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
A follow-up on the Pelosi's laptop story from the Washington Post by Tonya Riley

Pelosi laptop theft highlights 'real counterintelligence concerns,' lawmaker says

There are growing concerns that U.S. adversaries may be seeking ways to benefit from the Capitol assault and that some of rioters may have been looking to work with them.

The FBI is investigating claims that Riley June Williams stole a laptop or hard drive from the office of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and intended to sell the device to Russia's intelligence services by way of a friend who lives in the country.

“The idea that a group of so-called ‘patriots’ would sell a government computer to the Russians should tell you everything you need to know about the people who assaulted the Capitol,” Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), incoming chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in a statement. “There are real counterintelligence concerns associated with a breach like the one that occurred on January 6th.”

Williams was arrested Monday in her home state of Pennsylvania, and it's unclear if she still had the laptop in her possession. She has been charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct in the Capitol, Spencer S. Hsu and Hannah Knowles report. The case is the first with foreign intelligence implications. There could be more.

The Justice Department is treating its investigation into the riot “just like a significant international counter-terrorism or counterintelligence operation,” acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia Michael Sherwin said last week. Sherwin previously stated that his office was still assessing how many of the more than 100 cases related to the Capitol riot involved “national security equities.” He previously said that “multiple devices” were stolen.

The FBI also is looking into potential financial ties between some of the groups that incited the riot and foreign governments, NBC News reported. Warner raised the possibility that foreign powers could have “easily” attempted to send in foreign assets during the chaos to steal information or plant bugs. “Maintaining physical control over spaces and systems is a key part, although hardly the only part, of ensuring that our adversaries cannot access our protected information,” he said.

Although the government normally keeps its most classified information in separate spaces, access to devices can do plenty of damage, experts say. The full extent of the damage is unclear.

Pelosi's office declined to comment on the investigation into Williams. Pelosi's Deputy Chief of Staff Drew Hammill earlier this month confirmed that one laptop, which was used for conference room presentations, had been stolen.

The FBI is also investigating other forms of foreign interference.

Russia and other foreign adversaries have already exploited unrest in the Capitol to spread propaganda, intelligence officials say. Russia, Iran and China have exploited the deadly riot to promote their own interests on state media, a recent memo from the FBI and Department of Homeland Security warned. Congress is still urging Capitol security and IT staff to investigate.

Rep. Anna G. Eshoo (D-Calif.) requested an investigation in the security threat posed earlier this month. Her office did not respond for comment on the status of the investigation. (A House memo earlier this month indicated that the House network had not been compromised and noted all wired access and computers were shut down during the attack.)

And this from our local paper.
https://patch.com/pennsylvania/plymouthwhitemarsh/s/he1g2/pa-woman-accused-of-taking-pelosis-laptop-at-capitol-arrested?utm_source=alert-breakingnews&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
I agree, to a degree.

Obviously there’s more to this story than the FBI is letting on at this time, since they leaked the story I’m assuming.

But ‘IF’ true, she should be prosecuted for treason, which by the law of the land reads …

§2381. Treason. Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States. (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 807; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII, §330016(2)(J), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title18/part1/chapter115&edition=prelim

There’s quite a bit of play in the statuette for a federal judge and jury to consider in sentencing anyway, again ‘IF’ true. I highly doubt she’ll be brought in front of a firing squad as Mikado desires, unless Pelosi’s laptop had highly sensitive encrypted secrets, which I doubt, and she knew it, when she offered to pass it along to a Russian national, which I also doubt.

Whether we believe the law on treason is just or not is inconsequential at this time, be it for a regular citizen, law enforcement personnel, a congressman/woman, Senator … or dare I say it, the president of the United States, as some former intelligence heads, in his administration, have brought up in a public setting. His interactions with Russia and Putin have also been very troubling, before and after he was elected president, which he was warned about repeatedly by his own staff, member’s in the Cabinet and intelligence officials.

There’s no use of having a law decree on the books for treason, if it’s not going to be enforced. FULL STOP.

Willful violence is one thing, not that I believe that the insurrectionists should be let go with a slap on the hand and a promise not to do it again, but her possible willingness to pass along the laptop to an adversarial foreign power, like Russia, as I said, is very troubling.
I see what you're saying about treason. What I'm saying is with insurrection the average case should be about a year I'm guessing. For a person who what amounts to taking a few pics. There's people who are suggesting 3-5 years or "send a message" which is wrong. The sentence has to fit the crime. Obviously intent to kill and other violent acts will be more.
 

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