Turntable Recommendations

mossman77

mossman77

Full Audioholic
Looking to add a turntable to my setup. I have a Marantz receiver so am considering the Marantz TT42P, for no other reason than to have matching emblems. Open for suggestions. Thanks.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
You already have a record collection? If I didn't already, I wouldn't buy a tt. I still have my collection and tt but rarely use them except for a bit of nostalgia or something I don't have a digital version of. YMMV. What's your budget for tt and cartridge?
 
mossman77

mossman77

Full Audioholic
You already have a record collection? If I didn't already, I wouldn't buy a tt. I still have my collection and tt but rarely use them except for a bit of nostalgia or something I don't have a digital version of. YMMV. What's your budget for tt and cartridge?
I have about 50 or so records passed down to me. Old Beatles albums, Michael Jackson, Air Supply, Bee Gees, Jefferson Airplane, and others. I'd be willing pay up to $300 or so.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Better quality, more features than the basic model. Maybe a comparo on their website? Even better would be the LP1240 but outside your budget. I'd rather get a manual tt than an automatic myself, just less to go wrong and a feature that's fairly easy to live without.....unless you want to put a stack of records on and then go do stuff then maybe a changer would be even better....
 
mossman77

mossman77

Full Audioholic
Better quality, more features than the basic model. Maybe a comparo on their website? Even better would be the LP1240 but outside your budget. I'd rather get a manual tt than an automatic myself, just less to go wrong and a feature that's fairly easy to live without.....unless you want to put a stack of records on and then go do stuff then maybe a changer would be even better....
What do you mean by manual and automatic? I wouldn't want a changer.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
What do you mean by manual and automatic? I wouldn't want a changer.
The little I looked at the Marantz unit mentioned it was an automatic (assume start/stop functions).

Manual means a rotating platter and an arm you need to place/remove manually, no mechanical assistance in starting/stopping playing the record.
 
mossman77

mossman77

Full Audioholic
The little I looked at the Marantz unit mentioned it was an automatic (assume start/stop functions).

Manual means a rotating platter and an arm you need to place/remove manually, no mechanical assistance in starting/stopping playing the record.
I see. Well, I think I'd be fine with that. The record player we had when we were growing up was automatic and I don't recall it ever being an issue.
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
Normally we'd say just stick with digital, but you already have a bit of a collection. That said, I do 'get' vinyl. There's just something cool about watching your record spin, the needle in the groove, the occasional pop and crackle... there's definitely a fun factor involved with vinyl.

Just understand that digital is a superior format (In my and many others' opinion), despite what some of the purists believe.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
I see. Well, I think I'd be fine with that. The record player we had when we were growing up was automatic and I don't recall it ever being an issue.
It's just not as "pure" to use an automatic plus the mechanism could be introducing a bit more noise into the mix....but would make it easier if you get busy while a record is playing and you can't go and lift the pickup from the run-out groove at the end of the record :). I've had the same manual turntable since 84 (a Technics SL1200mk2, the one the AudioTechnica is somewhat a clone of), before that I used a Dual player with the changer option. Use what works for you.

Don't know if you saw this already https://www.audioholics.com/gadget-reviews/marantz-tt42-pre
 
MR.MAGOO

MR.MAGOO

Audioholic General
No problems with my Marantz TT42 automatic (about $330), nor my Pro-ject Debut Carbon Esprit SB manual ($600). Enjoy music the way you want (cassette, 8-track, vinyl, CD, streaming) and try not to let people annoy you about your choices. The GIGO rule applies, garbage in garbage out. If the LP has scratches and damage, you will hear snap crackle pop. I've had CD's which skip. The much ballyhooed digital streams can be so compressed you can't hear any major difference. I've listened to a jazz station stream from a station only 20 miles away, sounds like crap, while one 100 miles away is clear. Go figure.
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
I would look at Orbit, ProJect, and Fluance models. I like ProJect for their use of carbon fibre tone arms. My record collection has doubled in the last 5 years.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
OP, about 3 years ago I re-visited my LP collection, which I had not touched since the late 1980's. Seems I succumbed to propaganda coming from those caught up in the whirlwind of the vinyl revival who claimed vinyl was better than ever. Having to hear this for myself, I purchased a capable turntable, cartridge, and even eight new LP's, for an expenditure somewhere around $2300. At any rate, two things I took away from this experience: first, my new turntable had enough cartridge adjustment features to get all there was in the groove to get. and second, my Mother-In-Law's turntable, a knock-off of mine, also seemed to get all there was in the groove to get. This leads me to recommend you buy what my Mother-In-Law purchased, an audio-technica AT-120-USB Turntable, which comes with a nice cartridge, all for less than $300. Now, what's most attractive about this turntable are it's features, like vertical tracking angle adjustment, s-shaped tonearm, and a detachable headshell, which makes proper cartridge alignment without need for a protractor easy to achieve in just a few minutes.
 
Last edited:
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
OP, about 3 years ago I re-visited my LP collection, which I had not touched since the late 1980's. Seems I succumbed to propaganda coming from those caught up in the whirlwind of the vinyl revival who claimed vinyl was better than ever. Having to hear this for myself, I purchased a capable turntable, cartridge, and even eight new LP's, for an expenditure somewhere around $2300. At any rate, two things I took away from this experience: first, my new turntable had enough cartridge adjustment features to get all there was in the groove to get. and second, my Mother-In-Law's turntable, a knock-off of mine, also seemed to get all there was in the groove to get. This leads me to recommend you buy what my Mother-In-Law purchased, an audio-technica AT-120-USB Turntable, which comes with a nice cartridge, all for less than $300. Now, what's most attractive about this turntable are it's features, like vertical tracking angle adjustment, s-shaped tonearm, and a detachable headshell, which makes proper cartridge alignment without need for a protractor easy to achieve in just a few minutes.
One would still need a protractor to align the cartride once the assembly has been attached back to the tone arm UNLESS, there are markings on the headshell to indicate a proper alignment for a particular cartridge. Almost all headshells I came across in my lifetime did not have such markings. To make matters worse, the headshells have elongated grooves for the mounting screws to go through so that the shell could accomadate different cartridges.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
One would still need a protractor to align the cartride once the assembly has been attached back to the tone arm UNLESS, there are markings on the headshell to indicate a proper alignment for a particular cartridge. Almost all headshells I came across in my lifetime did not have such markings. To make matters worse, the headshells have elongated grooves for the mounting screws to go through so that the shell could accomadate different cartridges.
TTs with an s-shaped tonearm permit carts to be aligned properly simply by setting the stylus to headshell tail distance to TT's manufactures recommendation, i.e. 52mm, with cartridge then squared to headshell. The stylus to headshell tail distance on the A-T turntable I suggested to OP is 53mm. BTW, to get Technics tracking error scheme specification from my Technics SL-1210GR, the stylus to headshell distance is 52mm. To achieve Sony PS-4750 TT's tracking error scheme specification the stylus to headshell tail distance is 49mm. In all cases a protractor is not necessary, just set stylus to headshell tail distance to TT's manufacturers recommendation and square the cart to the headshell. Interestingly enough, my Shure V15V-MR cartridge came with a jig to get Stevenson alignment, and it relates perfectly to the Sony/Technics alignment scheme.
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
TTs with an s-shaped tonearm permit carts to be aligned properly simply by setting the stylus to headshell tail distance to TT's manufactures recommendation, i.e. 52mm, with cartridge then squared to headshell. The stylus to headshell tail distance on the A-T turntable I suggested to OP is 53mm. BTW, to get Technics tracking error scheme specification from my Technics SL-1210GR, the stylus to headshell distance is 52mm. To achieve Sony PS-4750 TT's tracking error scheme specification the stylus to headshell tail distance is 49mm. In all cases a protractor is not necessary, just set stylus to headshell tail distance to TT's manufacturers recommendation and square the cart to the headshell. Interestingly enough, my Shure V15V-MR cartridge came with a jig to get Stevenson alignment, and it relates perfectly to the Sony/Technics alignment scheme.
Where did you get this information?
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
Where did you get this information?
It's common knowledge; yet, it is also generally found in the operating manuals for TT's, like the SL-1210GR, in the section on cartridge alignment. TT's with straight tonearms must be aligned via a protractor for whatever alignment scheme is sought. Some TT's with straight tonearm, non-detachable headshell, and no means for VTA adjustment, like some of the Rega Turntables, I have rejected, since my appetite for interchange of cartridges make such a TT too much of a hassle. At any rate, of course, I am not precluded to the Technics alignment scheme. I could certainly use a protractor for other notions about proper cartridge alignment; but, so far the Technics scheme has produced distortion free sound from outer to inner grooves for all cartridges I've run on the Technics SL-1210GR, Shure V15V-MR, Shure V15V-MR/Jico SAS, Shure M97xE, and Ortofon 2M Red. One more thing, since the s-shaped tonearm supports proper alignment from a squared cartridge set to a specific stylus to headshell tail distance, such tonearms can be fitted with Plug N Play carts, which require ZERO attention to alignment. Here's a pic of one from Ortofon.
thHXNWCMAP.jpg
Also, here's a pic of my cartridge mounted to Technics headshell adjusted to Technics alignment scheme.
 

Attachments

Last edited:
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
Where did you get this information?
Here's my Sony set up: Note the clear plastic 49mm stylus to headshell gauge with bullseye etching. Also note that a cartridge can not be simply adjusted on a straight tonearm by this method.
 
Last edited:
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
It's common knowledge; yet, it is also generally found in the operating manuals for TT's, like the SL-1210GR, in the section on cartridge alignment. TT's with straight tonearms must be aligned via a protractor for whatever alignment scheme is sought. Some TT's with straight tonearm, non-detachable headshell, and no means for VTA adjustment, like some of the Rega Turntables, I have rejected, since my appetite for interchange of cartridges make such a TT too much of a hassle.
I asked because I did some goggling :) and I didnt come across this fact about S shaped tone arrms and cartridge alignment. Owners manuals are a a legit source of info.

My old entry Radio Shack TT was a semi automatic euippeed with an S shaped tonearm and it produced lots of distortion towards the end of the record. The cartridge which was an entry level Shure must have been misaligned is my guess. The TT was a floating plinth design which I will never buy into again as this SOB skipped like crazy just by walking by. I made sure the tracking weight was set within the weight limits of the cartridge but it still skipped when walking by it. I hated it. So I stopped playing my vinyl (as I wanted to keep my records in good shape) at that point until I could afford a decent table.

I picked up the ProJect XpressionIII with an acrylic platter. It has a straight carbon fiber tone arm with a fixed or molded in head shell and an Ortofon Red. I can adjust the VTA on it by loosening a pair of screws at the base of the arm which is easy enough. I'm amazed at how quiet the XpressionIII plays compared to the Radio Shack model. There is no hum nor rumble to be heard.
 

newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top