Trump Rolls Back Online Privacy in Regulatory Shell Game

gene

gene

Audioholics Master Chief
Administrator
President Donal Trump just signed a repeal for an FCC privacy regulation designed to protect consumers from Internet providers selling their data. If present deregulation continues, your ISP and wireless provider will be able to sell your browsing history, app usage and geolocation information without your permission.

Your online privacy could potentially be a new revenue source for telecommunications companies like Comcast and AT&T. Who do you trust to protect your data?



Read: Trump Rolls Back Online Privacy in Regulatory Shell Game
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Doesn't this new rule essentially leave things as they are now as the FCC rules that they're undoing hadn't gone into effect yet? So its more a status quo thing rather than something that actually changed let alone all the various ways your online use is tracked with various devices.
 
G

Gabriel Hebert

Audiophyte
You mean, they are selling information that they were already getting since NSA has been known to do this for years now? If anybody assumes they have had any privacy for the last decade or so, they would be wrong. Everything you do online is captured, collected, shared and sold.

The real kicker is we all agree to it. Do any of us read the terms and conditions for ISP companies? Apps? Browsers? Smartphones? No, because all we know is "if I don't agree to the T&C, I can't use X/Y/Z" so we click "agree" without a care for what we are agreeing to give away so long as no one stops us from posting every fleeting thought and memories on Facebook, Snapchat and so on.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
There must be some way to prove that we own our browsing history- if we can, we might be able to monetize it and get a slice when it's sold. THEY need US, too.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
There must be some way to prove that we own our browsing history- if we can, we might be able to monetize it and get a slice when it's sold. THEY need US, too.
Keeping the internet private is as much a privacy issue as it is a monetary issue. But either way, someone is providing that data, and all the cables between. This change in policy means that all of that search history belongs to highest bidder. You/we, are just consumers.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Regardless of how much access ISPs actually have to browsing history, or what was the norm before, this is not a step in the right direction. A law prohibiting ISPs from selling their user's browsing history is a good idea, period. Everyday we are being sold down the river a little bit more by this president and this congress, and this presidential term has just barely begun. How bad will it be after four years of this?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Regardless of how much access ISPs actually have to browsing history, or what was the norm before, this is not a step in the right direction. A law prohibiting ISPs from selling their user's browsing history is a good idea, period. Everyday we are being sold down the river a little bit more by this president and this congress, and this presidential term has just barely begun. How bad will it be after four years of this?
Oh, now it's only happening because Trump is in office? This is a roll-back of an Obama order- why wasn't it a problem when it was written?

Stop thinking that only one party or person is doing this.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Oh, now it's only happening because Trump is in office? This is a roll-back of an Obama order- why wasn't it a problem when it was written?

Stop thinking that only one party or person is doing this.
Look at it this way, Obama was taking a step forward for consumer privacy protections, and Trump just stopped it. In this particular case, it is one person and party doing this. You can't possibly be defending the roll-back of this law?
 
BoredSysAdmin

BoredSysAdmin

Audioholic Overlord
I think your concern is dramatically overblown, particularly since ISPs have access to so much less data than Google. For details, see http://www.iisp.gatech.edu/working-paper-online-privacy-and-isps
Lets agree to disagree. It's false thinking to compare ISPs and search/social media giants.
a) you PAY prior for the service, while you get a free services from the later.
b) you CAN choose NOT to use ether of later providers, but something like 90% of Americans (or even higher) don't have a choices of ISP capable of broadband speeds (25mbs down or higher) - only one local options

As for linked paper in addition to points a and b let me touch of some of author points:
1) Multiple device access - yes, many people use multiple devices and providers, but it's not hard to track user across all devices - google for VZW Super-cookie etc..
2)Pervasive encryption - Yes, https is becoming more common (partially thanks to LetsEncrypt/Mozilla foundation efforts). HTTPS will stop ISP (in most cases, but not all) from sniffing the CONTENT of webpages you visit, BUT it will absolutely NOT stop them from knowing the important bits of website address you've visited
3) Shift in Domain name lookup - this is a bit inaccurate, but tools like DNSCrypt will provide some extra privacy, but even with HTTPS site, the base address (ie Domain name) does get sent in clear text and ISP will see it, regardless of obfuscating DNS lookup. YES VPN service will obviously stop ISP from getting that sweet sweet browsing data, but not all VPN providers are equally good. You may just giving it away to another guy. Remember, as Wayde said - if you getting it free, then you're the product.

Regarding to Non-ISP points - Agreed, they already know crapton about you, but at least you've a choice not to use them at all. They are alternatives for every single Non-ISP service provider.
Again, Can't be said same thing about you local ISP broadband monopoly.

Few more points:
a) the method used to roll-back this regulation ENSURES than it is IMPOSSIBLE to re-introduce it ever again.
b) FTC not just lacks the rule making authority regarding ISPs, but they are also underfunded and already overly busy. FTC are also not able to make wide rules, only acts on individual cases.
 
Last edited:
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Look at it this way, Obama was taking a step forward for consumer privacy protections, and Trump just stopped it. In this particular case, it is one person and party doing this. You can't possibly be defending the roll-back of this law?
I would want to see what other provisions were slipped into the Bill- if it contains anything similar to the real estate tax that was slipped into the ACA, I'm in favor of blocking it.
 
rojo

rojo

Audioholic Samurai
I would want to see what other provisions were slipped into the Bill- if it contains anything similar to the real estate tax that was slipped into the ACA, I'm in favor of blocking it.
Look, Fox News, we all agree that there are reasons not to deify Obama. But going out of your way to hate everything he did just because it's he who did it demonstrates nothing but a closed mind, is useless in intelligent debate, and makes you look like the GOP blacktrackers who once endorsed Merrick Garland until Obama had the audacity to agree with them.

Don't change the subject. We're not talking about the ACA. There's already another thread somewhere for that. In this thread, we're talking about net neutrality and personal privacy online. Regardless of your prejudices, privacy rules were scheduled to go in effect in favor of the public, and now the GOP are tipping the scales back toward corporate interests. Does this rollback benefit you personally somehow? Aren't you at least a little indignant about relinquishing your privacy without your consent?
 
little wing

little wing

Audioholic Chief
Regardless of how much access ISPs actually have to browsing history, or what was the norm before, this is not a step in the right direction. A law prohibiting ISPs from selling their user's browsing history is a good idea, period. Everyday we are being sold down the river a little bit more by this president and this congress, and this presidential term has just barely begun. How bad will it be after four years of this?

Trump has a hair across his ass for Obama. He is trying undo everything he did while in office..
 
Ponzio

Ponzio

Audioholic Samurai
But it's OK now though because Agent Orange cares so much about the "babies" of Syria, just not their parents who are trying to get them to a safe haven. what does this have to do with net neutrality? nothing. feel free to go back to ur regularly scheduled circle jerk.
 

newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top