The future of soundbar type technology

Calvert

Calvert

Audioholic
Ratings
15 1
#1
Just a theory yet it seems the tech minds could develop true full size AV in a soundbar size. Can you imagine the change in the AV industry. Note, I am not talking about a new soundbar but an entire new AV tech. Dreams.
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,113 4 1
#3
Calvert, I’m wondering what this av tech might look like from your minds eye. Your post is a little vague is all.
 
Calvert

Calvert

Audioholic
Ratings
15 1
#4
A quick reply.
  • compact full function AVR or just amp
  • high powered yet reduced size fronts w/ATMOS, reduced size rears with nearly unlimited placement, reduced size sub
  • elimination of rears by fronts providing (really) outstanding virtual surround and ATMOS.
All of my quick wish list requires wholesale tech development and is one of those far, far off achievements.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
973 5
#5
A quick reply.
  • compact full function AVR or just amp
  • high powered yet reduced size fronts w/ATMOS, reduced size rears with nearly unlimited placement, reduced size sub
  • elimination of rears by fronts providing (really) outstanding virtual surround and ATMOS.
All of my quick wish list requires wholesale tech development and is one of those far, far off achievements.
They make soundbars that do this already. Won't change the fact that they are still soundbars. Some may sound decent, but they won't ever be a replacement for a full surround system. Bouncing audio won't ever sound as good as it will coming directly from a speaker.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic Chief
Ratings
201 5 1
#6
If any here know the future, I'd like to be your new best friend. I know I don't know the future; but, I do know the trend is simplification. Perhaps it's what propels the electronics and music sales leader, Apple. Now, although I do not know the future what I see in my neighborhood is Home Theatre not being embraced by millennials, as they have interests which are satisfied without the need of Home Theatre. This makes me think soundbars and technology to make soundbars sound better for less money will be what most folks add to their big screen TV budget. I also conclude that power amps, control amps, discrete components, etc. will all become history as folks get into active wireless speakers, that's to say, right now, a pair of active wireless speakers and an iPhone can deliver the sort of presentation that you'd get from an integrated amp, passive speakers, and a CD Player just a few years ago. The iPhone can deliver in fact not only stored contenct but it can stream content for the pleasure of anything ever recorded in the history of music recording. WOW! Now, think when multi-channel audio/video is deliverable from iPhone to active wireless speakers what would be the point for pre/pros, power amps, and source components? One more thing, there is resistance to the iPhone/active, wireless speaker trend, it's called a turntable. Millennials are fascinated with them, meaning the need for a phono preamp, intergrated amp, or line preamp and power amp and of course a pair of passive speakers. And, all of this means two distinct markets, which could integrate around the pre/pro with phone input. That is unless one simply gets a phone out to iPhone input adapter/converter of some sort.
 
Last edited:
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
973 5
#7
If any here know the future, I'd like to be your new best friend. I know I don't know the future; but, I do know the trend is simplification. Perhaps it's what propels the electronics and music sales leader, Apple. Now, although I do not know the future what I see in my neighborhood is Home Theatre not being embraced by millennials, as they have interests which are satisfied without the need of Home Theatre. This makes me think soundbars and technology to make soundbars sound better for less money will be what most folks add to their big screen TV budget. I also conclude that power amps, control amps, discrete components, etc. will all become history as folks get into active wireless speakers, that's to say, right now, a pair of active wireless speakers and an iPhone can deliver the sort of presentation that you'd get from an integrated amp, passive speakers, and a CD Player just a few years ago. The iPhone can deliver in fact not only stored contenct but it can stream content for the pleasure of anything ever recorded in the history of music recording. WOW! Now, think when multi-channel audio/video is deliverable from iPhone to active wireless speakers what would be the point for pre/pros, power amps, and source components? One more thing, there is resistance to the iPhone/active, wireless speaker trend, it's called a turntable. Millennials are fascinated with them, meaning the need for a phono preamp, intergrated amp, or line preamp and power amp and of course a pair of passive speakers. And, all of this means two distinct markets, which could integrate around the pre/pro with phone input. That is unless one simply gets a phone out to iPhone input adapter/converter of some sort.
Wow. Lots of assumptions in that post. Fun fact: I'm "technically" a millennial and I've got 3 different surround systems in my house. All the way from 2.1 to 7.4.4. I don't care about nor will I buy anything from Apple. My first system had a turntable and cassette deck and I rarely used the TT. The only TT I have now is in a big console player my grandmother gave me that I plan to restore.

I don't listen to music from my phone unless it's connected to my car stereo. I don't own any wireless speakers because most suck and I have no need for them.

What I will agree with you on is that sound bars are here to stay, but I don't ever expect one to really sound "good" compared to even the cheapest of 2.1 systems. I've listened to quite a few since I had considered on for my living room, but they all sounded so bad I opted for something I never thought I'd do. All in-ceiling speakers. It actually sounds awesome. I was shocked.

If sound bars stopped trying to replace full surround and just did a good job at being a 2.1 setup then I think we would see a drastic jump in sound quality. That would only be hampered by the fact that people want them to bee as small as possible. Speakers are like engines. There's no replacement for displacement.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic Chief
Ratings
201 5 1
#8
Wow. Lots of assumptions in that post. Fun fact: I'm "technically" a millennial and I've got 3 different surround systems in my house. All the way from 2.1 to 7.4.4. I don't care about nor will I buy anything from Apple. My first system had a turntable and cassette deck and I rarely used the TT. The only TT I have now is in a big console player my grandmother gave me that I plan to restore.

I don't listen to music from my phone unless it's connected to my car stereo. I don't own any wireless speakers because most suck and I have no need for them.

What I will agree with you on is that sound bars are here to stay, but I don't ever expect one to really sound "good" compared to even the cheapest of 2.1 systems. I've listened to quite a few since I had considered on for my living room, but they all sounded so bad I opted for something I never thought I'd do. All in-ceiling speakers. It actually sounds awesome. I was shocked.

If sound bars stopped trying to replace full surround and just did a good job at being a 2.1 setup then I think we would see a drastic jump in sound quality. That would only be hampered by the fact that people want them to bee as small as possible. Speakers are like engines. There's no replacement for displacement.
My business is marketing, I don't make assumptions. The research on millennials is out there for anyone to look at, so, neither of us need to make assumptions based on personal experiences with this concept (sound bars) which suggests that others in numbers share either my perspective or yours.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
973 5
#9
My business is marketing, I don't make assumptions. The research on millennials is out there for anyone to look at, so, neither of us need to make assumptions based on personal experiences with this concept (sound bars) which suggests that others in numbers share either my perspective or yours.
I think my point is more than just "you can't say all millennials are X way", but more that I think the hobby we have is and has pretty much always been pretty niche. I know more people my age and younger that have full surround than I do people of any other age (still a small percentage though).

When I sold A/V it was MUCH easier to get younger people to buy a full surround system that had floor standing mains. Many of the older couples male side wanted them, but got the ax from the wife. She didn't want "ugly" speakers cluttering up her decor.

So I don't think it has to do with age group at all, but more that most people simply don't care about decent sound.
 
Calvert

Calvert

Audioholic
Ratings
15 1
#10
"Many of the older couples male side wanted them, but got the ax from the wife. She didn't want "ugly" speakers cluttering up her decor."

panteragstk's statement is accurate. New décor was the basis for our move from high quality 5.1.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
973 5
#11
"Many of the older couples male side wanted them, but got the ax from the wife. She didn't want "ugly" speakers cluttering up her decor."

panteragstk's statement is accurate. New décor was the basis for our move from high quality 5.1.
I'm sorry...
 
DIY Junky

DIY Junky

Audioholic
Ratings
105
#12
Wow. Lots of assumptions in that post. Fun fact: I'm "technically" a millennial and I've got 3 different surround systems in my house. All the way from 2.1 to 7.4.4. I don't care about nor will I buy anything from Apple. My first system had a turntable and cassette deck and I rarely used the TT. The only TT I have now is in a big console player my grandmother gave me that I plan to restore.

I don't listen to music from my phone unless it's connected to my car stereo. I don't own any wireless speakers because most suck and I have no need for them.

What I will agree with you on is that sound bars are here to stay, but I don't ever expect one to really sound "good" compared to even the cheapest of 2.1 systems. I've listened to quite a few since I had considered on for my living room, but they all sounded so bad I opted for something I never thought I'd do. All in-ceiling speakers. It actually sounds awesome. I was shocked.

If sound bars stopped trying to replace full surround and just did a good job at being a 2.1 setup then I think we would see a drastic jump in sound quality. That would only be hampered by the fact that people want them to bee as small as possible. Speakers are like engines. There's no replacement for displacement.
I made a sound bar out of a old pair of 7" Ohm's.. and the only reason was to replace the small speakers in a Flat screen . That is all a sound bar will ever be... No participation trophy for sound bars … Physics and Science wont allow it
 
DIY Junky

DIY Junky

Audioholic
Ratings
105
#13
I think my point is more than just "you can't say all millennials are X way", but more that I think the hobby we have is and has pretty much always been pretty niche. I know more people my age and younger that have full surround than I do people of any other age (still a small percentage though).

When I sold A/V it was MUCH easier to get younger people to buy a full surround system that had floor standing mains. Many of the older couples male side wanted them, but got the ax from the wife. She didn't want "ugly" speakers cluttering up her decor.

So I don't think it has to do with age group at all, but more that most people simply don't care about decent sound.
My 3 year old grandson will tell you MP3's suck and He knows a proper sound stage and DON"T TOUCH the speakers we listen to speakers we don't touch them.. hearing a 3 year old say that put's a joyful tear to my eye
 

newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
  • CEDIA