Sony STR-K502P - thoughts on cheap replacement subwoofer?

S

SirWinston

Audiophyte
Hi guys,

I'd like to rack your brains regarding replacing a subwoofer? I've got an old Sony STR-K502P that I'd like to drag out of retirement, but the subwoofer was thrown out years ago? It looks like the original package/model number for the system was HT-DDW830, but I'm not 100% sure? The original satellites are still with it (SS-MSP1), and I believe the original subwoofer model was SA-WMSP1? I know my way around a basic equalizer, and understand how the basic electrical specifications work. It looks like the original system package model was But I otherwise don't know how to identify subwoofers that would be a decent match for it? I've been keeping an eye out on my local secondhand markets (Australia, so eBay and Gumtree mostly), but I'm not opposed to buying a new cheap brands sub if it would work well? Apart from general sound quality (limited mud please!), I'd like something that doesn't give me headaches when trying to set the crossover frequency? Any ideas what I should be looking for, what I need to know etc?

Also, I'll be hooking this up to a self-built HTPC. If you have any recommendations for a good cheap PCI-E sound card, please let me know. I've heard that some of the Xonar cards are good for non-gaming audio? But I'm an old ICT tech, so I'm not afraid of looking into lesser known or more fiddly options?

Thanks for your help!

Specs (from HT-DDW830 manual):
1568791603755.png

1568791636770.png
 

Attachments

TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Looks like you can use any powered sub you want.
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
Checking on your main speakers, it looks like they use 8cm drivers which converts to about 3-1/2".
The sub had an 8" driver.
Did you sub have a knob/control for the crossover frequency? I am guessing not (based on the following info). If it does then ignore this
The sub specifications indicate "High frequency cut off frequency is 150Hz".
I would expect this is what is more traditionally called a Low Pass Filter fixed at 150Hz, so that is the place to set the crossover frequency.

So the sub you get should have a knob for the crossover frequency that allows you to set it at 150Hz (some subs have lower values for their max crossover frequency).

This one is $80 shipped and Monoprice does a good job with their budget subs (I would expect this to out perform the original Sony sub):
https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-108248-60-Watt-Powered-Subwoofer/dp/B009GUTJ34/ref=sr_1_29?keywords=8"+subwoofer&qid=1568810368&rnid=493964&s=electronics&sr=1-29

Ideally you will stumble across a used one that would do the job for $40 or less. There are many subs (as I believe to be the case with yours) that were part of a package and do not have a control for crossover. No guarantees, but 150Hz does seem a common crossover frequency for these package setups (which typically come with smaller "satellite" speakers like yours with the 3.5" drivers). If you run into one of these at your local thrift shop for $10, it may be worth a gamble.

My approach for setting the volume for a sub in a system like this is to play music I am familiar with that has a good bass line and gradually increase the volume on the subwoofer until it starts to be obvious that sounds are coming from the sub (IOW, you will hear the fullness of bass in your room before you distinguish specific sounds distinctly coming from the subwoofer). Stop here - I usually find this is a very good starting place. Go back to your listening position and see if you want more or less bass. From the listening position, I generally don't want to hear anything coming distinctly from the sub (I presume your ears were much closer to the sub when you were adjusting the volume),but I do want to hear fullness in the bass region.
 
Last edited:
P

Planejumper

Audiophyte
Checking on your main speakers, it looks like they use 8cm drivers which converts to about 3-1/2".
The sub had an 8" driver.
Did you sub have a knob/control for the crossover frequency? I am guessing not (based on the following info). If it does then ignore this
The sub specifications indicate "High frequency cut off frequency is 150Hz".
I would expect this is what is more traditionally called a Low Pass Filter fixed at 150Hz, so that is the place to set the crossover frequency.

So the sub you get should have a knob for the crossover frequency that allows you to set it at 150Hz (some subs have lower values for their max crossover frequency).

This one is $80 shipped and Monoprice does a good job with their budget subs (I would expect this to out perform the original Sony sub):
https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-108248-60-Watt-Powered-Subwoofer/dp/B009GUTJ34/ref=sr_1_29?keywords=8"+subwoofer&qid=1568810368&rnid=493964&s=electronics&sr=1-29

Ideally you will stumble across a used one that would do the job for $40 or less. There are many subs (as I believe to be the case with yours) that were part of a package and do not have a control for crossover. No guarantees, but 150Hz does seem a common crossover frequency for these package setups (which typically come with smaller "satellite" speakers like yours with the 3.5" drivers). If you run into one of these at your local thrift shop for $10, it may be worth a gamble.

My approach for setting the volume for a sub in a system like this is to play music I am familiar with that has a good bass line and gradually increase the volume on the subwoofer until it starts to be obvious that sounds are coming from the sub (IOW, you will hear the fullness of bass in your room before you distinguish specific sounds distinctly coming from the subwoofer). Stop here - I usually find this is a very good starting place. Go back to your listening position and see if you want more or less bass. From the listening position, I generally don't want to hear anything coming distinctly from the sub (I presume your ears were much closer to the sub when you were adjusting the volume),but I do want to hear fullness in the bass region.
The subwoofer attached to the link you provided will not work. I have the same system that I just pulled out of storage after moving and my subwoofer isn’t working. However the original subwoofer with this rack system a) DOES have a “level” knob on the top right corner of it and b) has a single output cord that goes to a single subwoofer port on the back of the receiver
 
P

Planejumper

Audiophyte
The subwoofer attached to the link you provided will not work. I have the same system that I just pulled out of storage after moving and my subwoofer isn’t working. However the original subwoofer with this rack system a) DOES have a “level” knob on the top right corner of it and b) has a single output cord that goes to a single subwoofer port on the back of the receiver
Unless there’s an adapter that will allow the double male connectors on that subwoofer to connect to a single female connection on the back of the systems receiver
 
BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
Unless there’s an adapter that will allow the double male connectors on that subwoofer to connect to a single female connection on the back of the systems receiver
Why would he need an adapter? The back of the Monoprice subwoofer has RCA inputs on it, which is the most common and industry standard connection for a subwoofer on the market. It appears that the Sony receiver has a standard RCA subwoofer output on it...
See page 5 of the manual: https://docs.sony.com/release/strk502p.pdf
Page 12 of the same manual indicates that a standard RCA cable be used to an active subwoofer, which does mean it uses a industry standard connection for the sub.

If that's the case, then the Monoprice subwoofer will work just fine because it has standard RCA inputs on it.

Unless you know something that we don't know, you are providing bad information to the original poster on this one.

In fact, every single subwoofer on this page will work just fine with that old Sony receiver...
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Unless there’s an adapter that will allow the double male connectors on that subwoofer to connect to a single female connection on the back of the systems receiver
You can easily buy a cable "splitter" adapter or an entire cable that goes from one female rca output to two female rca inputs, but generally only one of the inputs on the sub is needed with most if operating in mono, so a single cable from sub pre-out to one input is fine as it's a mono signal from a sub pre-out....there can be a slight gain advantage for using both L/R input on a sub but fairly rare; using both L/R inputs is more important with limited 2ch gear that doesn't provide a mono sub pre-out....
 

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