Once again: what are you listening to now? Part 2.

Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
I'm pretty sure I've had some Orb stuff in my feed before, but don't think I've ever played a full album....
Ahh cool...I was introduced to them by college friends who saw them in japan, just as I was accepting being turned on to the dead, after being a "long time" (only 18 at this point) metal & Zep head, aand didn't particularly like, or appreciate it right away, with it being electronic

...but something about it kept me listening, and eventually all the right circumstances (whatever re-wiring in my brain that needed to happen, quality audio + altered state, I'm sure) lined up for me to hear it "right"

My mind was blown, aand I was smitten...had I not met the dead and oRb at the same time, I'm sure I wouldn't have given the other the chance they deserved, so I'm exceedingly grateful it went that way, 'cause both have played massive roles, aand really anchored music as being the primary driving force in my life from that point

As far as whole orB albums and live shows go...they're journey's with all parts being very deliberate, and with some, there are times which are less than perfectly pleasant

...but they serve a purpose if we're mature, patient, & tolerant enough to embrace, or at least endure them
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
I'm pretty sure I've had some Orb stuff in my feed before, but don't think I've ever played a full album....
Btw...for any potential new listeners of the orb, I do recommend starting with their early to mid 90's stuff, aand working yer way forward, 'cause it stayed quite rapidly evolving over its 30+ years...aand counting

So I do believe it's good to get a solid feel for their roots 1st, before jumping around their timeline

I'm heading toward jam mode, so I'll prolly throw a few cherry picked selections up that jump out at me as being good intros for any interested/curious
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
That was an all right something new, thx

I like the next track even better

 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Ninja
Ahh cool...I was introduced to them by college friends who saw them in japan, just as I was accepting being turned on to the dead, after being a "long time" (only 18 at this point) metal & Zep head, aand didn't particularly like, or appreciate it right away, with it being electronic

...but something about it kept me listening, and eventually all the right circumstances (whatever re-wiring in my brain that needed to happen, quality audio + altered state, I'm sure) lined up for me to hear it "right"

My mind was blown, aand I was smitten...had I not met the dead and oRb at the same time, I'm sure I wouldn't have given the other the chance they deserved, so I'm exceedingly grateful it went that way, 'cause both have played massive roles, aand really anchored music as being the primary driving force in my life from that point

As far as whole orB albums and live shows go...they're journey's with all parts being very deliberate, and with some, there are times which are less than perfectly pleasant

...but they serve a purpose if we're mature, patient, & tolerant enough to embrace, or at least endure them
I never could acquire a taste for Grateful Dead, beyond perhaps 2-3 songs. I tried to a couple times over the years. I do like some covers of their songs, and some jazz interpretations, as well, but they just never hooked me and I was into music back when they were pretty new, even with both of my older brothers making it to Woodstock. I do listen to some jam bands but I start making a turn when I start getting Dead covers and songs that play too long and repetitively so.

About the closest I get into electronica is the group Yello/Boris Blank and before that was Alan Parsons Project, or Emerson, Lake & Palmer. All I ever knew of Yello was the hit "Oh Yeah," from Ferris Bueller's Day Off. I surprised to find that they had quite a few, well recorded albums and not the one hit wonders I had imagined them to be. There is some other electronic music here and there, but I'm not real fond of say. . .Kraftwerk.

Jazz came much later after having revisited classic rock, yet again, and just not wanting to go anywhere near top 40 anything for awhile. Jazz grew on me pretty quickly and have always been a fan of Funk, thanks to David Bowie's "Golden Years" and "Fame." Those two songs led me to funk and ultimately jazz due to what associations existed between them. Jazz has been a much bigger rabbit hole to explore, compared to say, the B sides and hidden parts of rock that never made air play.
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
I never could acquire a taste for Grateful Dead, beyond perhaps 2-3 songs. I tried to a couple times over the years. I do like some covers of their songs, and some jazz interpretations, as well, but they just never hooked me and I was into music back when they were pretty new, even with both of my older brothers making it to Woodstock. I do listen to some jam bands but I start making a turn when I start getting Dead covers and songs that play too long and repetitively so.

About the closest I get into electronica is the group Yello/Boris Blank and before that was Alan Parsons Project, or Emerson, Lake & Palmer. All I ever knew of Yello was the hit "Oh Yeah," from Ferris Bueller's Day Off. I surprised to find that they had quite a few, well recorded albums and not the one hit wonders I had imagined them to be. There is some other electronic music here and there, but I'm not real fond of say. . .Kraftwerk.

Jazz came much later after having revisited classic rock, yet again, and just not wanting to go anywhere near top 40 anything for awhile. Jazz grew on me pretty quickly and have always been a fan of Funk, thanks to David Bowie's "Golden Years" and "Fame." Those two songs led me to funk and ultimately jazz due to what associations existed between them. Jazz has been a much bigger rabbit hole to explore, compared to say, the B sides and hidden parts of rock that never made air play.
Ya, I hear that...jazz is awesome, and Bowie's a cool one

I feel it's safe to say that experiencing the full majesty of both the dead's and the orb's music is wholly dependent on the listener spending a significant amount of time (or at least 1 extreme time) hearing it in the psychedelic state of mind, something that I was introduced to, and became fanatical about at an early age (14)

...or perhaps an exception might be having a solid 40 - 50 years worth of intensely dedicated power meditating under their belt, since what psychedelics essentially are, are a chemical shortcut to an extremely advanced meditative state

It used to be quite unexplainable, but we now know that their use breaks down natural barriers between different sections of our brains, which normally kept them from cross communicating ...allowing our brains to function in a much different manner/capacity than "normal"

Combine that with music containing exaggerated amounts of parts, rhythms, melodies, etc all layered on top of each other...aand we've got new and extraordinary conditions and perceptions that can occur on/in previously un-experienced levels or even dimensions

I don't really like to open with it, so as to not "scare" potential new fans off...but it appeared as though it took my mind about 3 years of near solid listening, for it to develop the ability to properly receive the orb's music in its entirety...a realization that was almost eerie, begging the question: Was this guy an alien, or tapped into some otherworldly consciousness?

I'd say jazz and classical both have the same potential, but the difference is that these particular musicians prepared and performed their music in these states of mind...the dead in real time, basically having to occasionally luck out to achieve that audio phenomena which results in that 3D+ fractal sound, whose total is more than the sum of its parts (after all, the dead and lsd grew up together) Alex admitting that the story of the music came from "screwing around making funny noises in the wee hours of Sunday mornings, after 3 days of club-type partying"

Dr Alex Paterson of tHe orB on the other hand, seems to have developed a concious understanding of precisely what creates the conditions for these occurances to minds in that state...aand can compose/orchestrate the musical constructs which lead to these situations intentionally, at any time

I've actually heard about college music professors stating that he's the greatest composer of our time, and I have to agree, having spent an inordinate amount of time scouring the globe for his musical equal, and only coming with with an occasional, semi close similarity
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
This is the 1st album btw, aand a fantastic place to start, for anyone that's ever going to


And this was their most palletable/popular tune, that made it to, and appealed to the masses


Aand it just gets better from there...it's best as REALLY active listening, like 100% attention on the music, in the moment, like a meditation...although many of them do have a sneaky way of working their way out from the background, if that's where the listener has them
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Ninja
Ya, I hear that...jazz is awesome, and Bowie's a cool one

I feel it's safe to say that experiencing the full majesty of both the dead's and the orb's music is wholly dependent on the listener spending a significant amount of time (or at least 1 extreme time) hearing it in the psychedelic state of mind, something that I was introduced to, and became fanatical about at an early age (14)

...or perhaps an exception might be having a solid 40 - 50 years worth of intensely dedicated power meditating under their belt, since what psychedelics essentially are, are a chemical shortcut to an extremely advanced meditative state

It used to be quite unexplainable, but we now know that their use breaks down natural barriers between different sections of our brains, which normally kept them from cross communicating ...allowing our brains to function in a much different manner/capacity than "normal"

Combine that with music containing exaggerated amounts of parts, rhythms, melodies, etc all layered on top of each other...aand we've got new and extraordinary conditions and perceptions that can occur on/in previously un-experienced levels or even dimensions

I don't really like to open with it, so as to not "scare" potential new fans off...but it appeared as though it took my mind about 3 years of near solid listening, for it to develop the ability to properly receive the orb's music in its entirety...a realization that was almost eerie, begging the question: Was this guy an alien, or tapped into some otherworldly consciousness?

I'd say jazz and classical both have the same potential, but the difference is that these particular musicians prepared and performed their music in these states of mind...the dead in real time, basically having to occasionally luck out to achieve that audio phenomena which results in that 3D+ fractal sound, whose total is more than the sum of its parts (after all, the dead and lsd grew up together) Alex admitting that the story of the music came from "screwing around making funny noises in the wee hours of Sunday mornings, after 3 days of club-type partying"

Dr Alex Paterson of tHe orB on the other hand, seems to have developed a concious understanding of precisely what creates the conditions for these occurances to minds in that state...aand can compose/orchestrate the musical constructs which lead to these situations intentionally, at any time

I've actually heard about college music professors stating that he's the greatest composer of our time, and I have to agree, having spent an inordinate amount of time scouring the globe for his musical equal, and only coming with with an occasional, semi close similarity
LSD was something that I was always over, 20 mins after it started. I always wanted it to wear off so the reefer would work again, instead. Mushrooms grew in all the pastures down here in the south too, but again, it did not fit with what I was into, more than half a dozen times, and that was the end of that. By then, I got what was to be gotten from it and lost interest. But then, we grew up imaginative, creative and crafty, so tripping too much would have been competition to what was already there. Is also how I was naturally able to fill in all the missing info that lo-fi couldn't muster. It's how we could get enjoyment from a portable suitcase Victrola sitting on the floor with stacks of 45s, in mono, no less, or even the AM radio in the car with the lone & blown, dashboard speaker, just as sober as the day we were born.

Same with drinking. Once I found out I was gonna be a dad, I lost interest in that too. What time I had for my other interests was severely limited thru the child rearing era, so what time I had, needed/wanted all my faculties. Now I drink a beer or two with dinner. . .but it's cooler out now and I'm not that kind of thirsty until it gets warm again, or on warm days, perhaps. I'm into coffee now. Not much. Maybe two cups/day, and whatever other organic supplement that might counter that pleasantly.

I don't discover music by working at, or altering my state of mind too much for it. That would be trying too hard for me personally. I am always either hooked by it initially, or not. Not to say that I won't find it some other time down the road, but there is just too much profoundly good music available at our fingertips, especially now.

What it comes down to from there is. . .subjectivity. Something we all get to really differ on now that there is so many choices and not being so herded into the mainstream like we once were. Other than that, there is no shortage of mind blowing content with what these modern speakers and subs are providing. So much so, that I am not inclined to add more channels, even after having been subjected to more 'effectual' systems. Again, also a byproduct of a hyper-imaginative existence, from having to get the mental pictures out of nothing more than text on page, images I can still see in my head, just recollecting books I have read throughout life. Comparatively, music is easy, and films easier yet, if not a bit too easy, if the modern seeming lack of creativity is any indication. How many fookin remakes of the old ideas can possibly keep amusing these dimwits?

Still, I get what others do to make it work for them. Me personally, something has kept me hooked on this hobby pretty faithfully nearing 50 years now and I still get my mind blown nearly every day and I listen that often leading up to marathons starting by Thursday - Sunday. The rest of the week I have to make myself quit before the next song gets me.
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
LSD was something that I was always over, 20 mins after it started. I always wanted it to wear off so the reefer would work again, instead. Mushrooms grew in all the pastures down here in the south too, but again, it did not fit with what I was into, more than half a dozen times, and that was the end of that. By then, I got what was to be gotten from it and lost interest. But then, we grew up imaginative, creative and crafty, so tripping too much would have been competition to what was already there. Is also how I was naturally able to fill in all the missing info that lo-fi couldn't muster. It's how we could get enjoyment from a portable suitcase Victrola sitting on the floor with stacks of 45s, in mono, no less, or even the AM radio in the car with the lone & blown, dashboard speaker, just as sober as the day we were born.

Same with drinking. Once I found out I was gonna be a dad, I lost interest in that too. What time I had for my other interests was severely limited thru the child rearing era, so what time I had, needed/wanted all my faculties. Now I drink a beer or two with dinner. . .but it's cooler out now and I'm not that kind of thirsty until it gets warm again, or on warm days, perhaps. I'm into coffee now. Not much. Maybe two cups/day, and whatever other organic supplement that might counter that pleasantly.

I don't discover music by working at, or altering my state of mind too much for it. That would be trying too hard for me personally. I am always either hooked by it initially, or not. Not to say that I won't find it some other time down the road, but there is just too much profoundly good music available at our fingertips, especially now.

What it comes down to from there is. . .subjectivity. Something we all get to really differ on now that there is so many choices and not being so herded into the mainstream like we once were. Other than that, there is no shortage of mind blowing content with what these modern speakers and subs are providing. So much so, that I am not inclined to add more channels, even after having been subjected to more 'effectual' systems. Again, also a byproduct of a hyper-imaginative existence, from having to get the mental pictures out of nothing more than text on page, images I can still see in my head, just recollecting books I have read throughout life. Comparatively, music is easy, and films easier yet, if not a bit too easy, if the modern seeming lack of creativity is any indication. How many fookin remakes of the old ideas can possibly keep amusing these dimwits?

Still, I get what others do to make it work for them. Me personally, something has kept me hooked on this hobby pretty faithfully nearing 50 years now and I still get my mind blown nearly every day and I listen that often leading up to marathons starting by Thursday - Sunday. The rest of the week I have to make myself quit before the next song gets me.
Yup yup to all of that...the mono suitcase player made me wince a l'il for sure, 'cause I grew into quite the stimulus junkie...always wanting to go bigger, better, more more more, heh heh

I guess I'm just a natural born prankster. Aand ya, drinking got old for me, by the time I was 18, 'cause my folks allowed my sis & I to serve ourselves at home within reason, around the same age I started getting into herb & psychs

The thing about gratuitously engaging with psychedelics is, it tends to make us hyper sensitive to all the things we do that aren't great for us. Soo often high frequency trippers quit tobacco, alcohol, meat & other energy stifling & health diminishing substances

But I hear you with that too, sometimes we can't have it all our way, & hafta make the best of what we've got in hand, aand I agree about the psychs only being able to get us so far before it's up to us to see what comes after, once they've done their job, pick up the ball, & keep runnin' with it

Starting off at 14, a simple mountain bike ride around town on a lonely night at chrismas time to be dazzled by all the lights was a treat
...even without a walkman for tunes, but everything's usually better with a soundtrack

Or just hangin' with 1 friend listening ta tunes at home, or while cruising around...even just meandering around town, we could turn into a blast of a time, dive bombing leaf piles, snowbanks...or hitting the lake for night swims

I was mostly a suburb/country/farm/lake area kid back then, so there were lots of simple things to do, that were more than enough

Driving age, a bunch of us, a car with a full tank, a rotation of 2 tape/cd albums of dead, live orb, future sound of london each...aand an Allman brothers, with a l'il local grown herb to puff, and late night, spun out, group therapy/philosophy sessions around a campfire kept us perpetually entertained, with souls cleansed & inner lights shining

Then I got dragged to my 1st dead show at 18 in '93, aand the specifically psychedelic focused live music experience was surely the missing ingredient. Having tapes, cd's was great, but the live show environment truly made a complete package

I dunno if you ever went to any live shows and partook...but it's a match made in heaven, especially when it's a band whose entire purpose is to cater to the psychedelicized mind, like dead/santana/orb, etc

That's not just enhanced music, done right...it should be on par with a profound religious experience every time...no matter how many times/often you do it. Course getting spun, taken by the music
...aand boogie'ing yer ass off all night completes it

And that's what it turned into for me. I only saw the 1 show in 93, but when the next spring rolled around, friends and I committed to catching as many shows as possible, aand we did fairly well, ...at least I did

People rotated in and out, but being the youngin' that I was, with nothing better to do
...I pretty much made a career out of being at big shows once I learned there were others who made them their home
...in the short period 'til the end in '95, I made it to around 100 of 'em

The thing about that life is, at times, ya need an artificial energy source, aand since psych heads aren't usually into coke, speed, etc...L becomes yer go to.

After all, ya don't wanna sleep through the greatest show on earth every night, 'cause yer too tired from the day's work

Then it was written that when dead came to an end, phish would take over...at least temporarily, so I kept it goin' with those

They weren't an instant favorite, and it was different, but we were there together & made it work...then the boys got their act back together to do Further & The Other Ones...& I did a few more years worth of that

There's a quote..."there comes a time when our minds and our bodies will no longer respond to moderate stimulation"

To engage in experiences like that occasionally & balance it out with a reasonable amount of "normal living" is one thing
...but to live a literal entire full & robust lifestyle of such gradiosity puts us in an unusual position & mindset/state. I'd say ya kinda hafta ween off of it

My touring days did eventually grind to a halt after a solid 6 or 7 yrs of it...but I don't regret a second if it

That did, however, create the immediate need for the ability to as closely replicate that experience in my living room

...which began my journey into the world of personal/home sound production in '98, aand I didn't do too shabby (haven't set any records either) but that's another story
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Ninja
Yup yup to all of that...the mono suitcase player made me wince a l'il for sure, 'cause I grew into quite the stimulus junkie...always wanting to go bigger, better, more more more, heh heh

I guess I'm just a natural born prankster. Aand ya, drinking got old for me, by the time I was 18, 'cause my folks allowed my sis & I to serve ourselves at home within reason, around the same age I started getting into herb & psychs

The thing about gratuitously engaging with psychedelics is, it tends to make us hyper sensitive to all the things we do that aren't great for us. Soo often high frequency trippers quit tobacco, alcohol, meat & other energy stifling & health diminishing substances

But I hear you with that too, sometimes we can't have it all our way, & hafta make the best of what we've got in hand, aand I agree about the psychs only being able to get us so far before it's up to us to see what comes after, once they've done their job, pick up the ball, & keep runnin' with it

Starting off at 14, a simple mountain bike ride around town on a lonely night at chrismas time to be dazzled by all the lights was a treat
...even without a walkman for tunes, but everything's usually better with a soundtrack

Or just hangin' with 1 friend listening ta tunes at home, or while cruising around...even just meandering around town, we could turn into a blast of a time, dive bombing leaf piles, snowbanks...or hitting the lake for night swims

I was mostly a suburb/country/farm/lake area kid back then, so there were lots of simple things to do, that were more than enough

Driving age, a bunch of us, a car with a full tank, a rotation of 2 tape/cd albums of dead, live orb, future sound of london each...aand an Allman brothers, with a l'il local grown herb to puff, and late night, spun out, group therapy/philosophy sessions around a campfire kept us perpetually entertained, with souls cleansed & inner lights shining

Then I got dragged to my 1st dead show at 18 in '93, aand the specifically psychedelic focused live music experience was surely the missing ingredient. Having tapes, cd's was great, but the live show environment truly made a complete package

I dunno if you ever went to any live shows and partook...but it's a match made in heaven, especially when it's a band whose entire purpose is to cater to the psychedelicized mind, like dead/santana/orb, etc

That's not just enhanced music, done right...it should be on par with a profound religious experience every time...no matter how many times/often you do it. Course getting spun, taken by the music
...aand boogie'ing yer ass off all night completes it

And that's what it turned into for me. I only saw the 1 show in 93, but when the next spring rolled around, friends and I committed to catching as many shows as possible, aand we did fairly well, ...at least I did

People rotated in and out, but being the youngin' that I was, with nothing better to do
...I pretty much made a career out of being at big shows once I learned there were others who made them their home
...in the short period 'til the end in '95, I made it to around 100 of 'em

The thing about that life is, at times, ya need an artificial energy source, aand since psych heads aren't usually into coke, speed, etc...L becomes yer go to.

After all, ya don't wanna sleep through the greatest show on earth every night, 'cause yer too tired from the day's work

Then it was written that when dead came to an end, phish would take over...at least temporarily, so I kept it goin' with those

They weren't an instant favorite, and it was different, but we were there together & made it work...then the boys got their act back together to do Further & The Other Ones...& I did a few more years worth of that

There's a quote..."there comes a time when our minds and our bodies will no longer respond to moderate stimulation"

To engage in experiences like that occasionally & balance it out with a reasonable amount of "normal living" is one thing
...but to live a literal entire full & robust lifestyle of such gradiosity puts us in an unusual position & mindset/state. I'd say ya kinda hafta ween off of it

My touring days did eventually grind to a halt after a solid 6 or 7 yrs of it...but I don't regret a second if it

That did, however, create the immediate need for the ability to as closely replicate that experience in my living room

...which began my journey into the world of personal/home sound production in '98, aand I didn't do too shabby (haven't set any records either) but that's another story
We did all our concerts later '70s-mid '80s. Got to see Tom Petty, Allman bros, original Skynrd, Ozzy (with Randy Rhoads) Pink Floyd, ELO, Boston, Judas Priest, Eagles, Jefferson Starship, Guess Who, SRV, etc.

Got to be more of a hassle that it was worth after awhile and when it came right down to it, I prefer studio music, having been disappointed numerous occasions with some favorite bands live performances, SQ wise, comparatively. Molly Hatchet was one, where the lead singer was drunk off his ass and couldn't sing WAF and basically just slobber-yelled at us. Then having to wear ear plugs and such at say, AC/DC or Ted Nugent, kind of defeated the purpose for seeing them live, which is odd to hear me say because I listen to loud music. Best concert for me was ZZ Top or Priest, while the most boring had to be Aerosmith on one of their earliest, if not debut tour.

I'm not a groupie or a devout fan of any one band or into any type of cult following. Very few bands evolved well for me beyond their first, or hit albums.

I came from a small town as well and we lived outdoors and partied in the woods pretty seriously. All we had to do was cruise the beaches, or find where everyone was at, and game rooms were a huge part of it, as well. We all had dirt bikes (or boats) that we could get around on without alarming the cops too much. We could take trails and reach all points of our town, and well into the surrounding ones only having to cross pavement a few times. And it was a relatively unknown port town on the Gulf, so experimental substances or herb was never in short supply.

Unfortunately, those who stayed in it too long, battle with it to this day, and I have lost most of my friends either due to them dying, or because they are a total mess by now, having moved on to hard/prescription drugs or alcoholism. I simply have no tolerance for their dysfunction, or even the people they know in that sort of a circle.

Truth be told, we exiled the problem ppl with no sense of moderation, even back then, just for not being able to afford the legal attention their antics could bring. Now it's all about trying for better health and peace, and having found hi-fi music to be one of the most life-enriching things I could have chosen as a passion.

I started hanging drywall at 15 yrs of age and went for 20 years, all 148# of me back then. I worked mostly with Nam vets/bikers and good o'l boys and the party was huge, never ending and quite extreme. I got to see it all, really, but it was known among my peers that I was an exception to their ways, and they didn't try to disrupt it. And if anyone tried to push me in other directions, they would step in and tell them to lay off. I think some even envied my party style of low maintenance/excitement, because I wasn't always broke and out by Monday. They were satisfied with helping to create a work monster instead, who could carry 2 sheets of 12' 5/8" drywall by himself, and keep up with feeding boards to two seasoned hangers slapping up stand-up sheets on commercial jobs, as fast as they could tack them up.

My music and creative ventures carried me thru with very little else. That and fishing. I have been a fishing addict all my life. I'm thinking now that a lot of my counterparts are wishing they had done that instead.
 
Bobby Bass

Bobby Bass

Senior Audioholic
Have always loved talking heads. Did ya see they resurrected the stop making sense movie this year for its 40th anniversary?
They put out a new version of the soundtrack which is excellent. A great sounding live band and David Byrne is a great showman.
 
Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
We did all our concerts later '70s-mid '80s. Got to see Tom Petty, Allman bros, original Skynrd, Ozzy (with Randy Rhoads) Pink Floyd, ELO, Boston, Judas Priest, Eagles, Jefferson Starship, Guess Who, SRV, etc.

Got to be more of a hassle that it was worth after awhile and when it came right down to it, I prefer studio music, having been disappointed numerous occasions with some favorite bands live performances, SQ wise, comparatively. Molly Hatchet was one, where the lead singer was drunk off his ass and couldn't sing WAF and basically just slobber-yelled at us. Then having to wear ear plugs and such at say, AC/DC or Ted Nugent, kind of defeated the purpose for seeing them live, which is odd to hear me say because I listen to loud music. Best concert for me was ZZ Top or Priest, while the most boring had to be Aerosmith on one of their earliest, if not debut tour.

I'm not a groupie or a devout fan of any one band or into any type of cult following. Very few bands evolved well for me beyond their first, or hit albums.

I came from a small town as well and we lived outdoors and partied in the woods pretty seriously. All we had to do was cruise the beaches, or find where everyone was at, and game rooms were a huge part of it, as well. We all had dirt bikes (or boats) that we could get around on without alarming the cops too much. We could take trails and reach all points of our town, and well into the surrounding ones only having to cross pavement a few times. And it was a relatively unknown port town on the Gulf, so experimental substances or herb was never in short supply.

Unfortunately, those who stayed in it too long, battle with it to this day, and I have lost most of my friends either due to them dying, or because they are a total mess by now, having moved on to hard/prescription drugs or alcoholism. I simply have no tolerance for their dysfunction, or even the people they know in that sort of a circle.

Truth be told, we exiled the problem ppl with no sense of moderation, even back then, just for not being able to afford the legal attention their antics could bring. Now it's all about trying for better health and peace, and having found hi-fi music to be one of the most life-enriching things I could have chosen as a passion.

I started hanging drywall at 15 yrs of age and went for 20 years, all 148# of me back then. I worked mostly with Nam vets/bikers and good o'l boys and the party was huge, never ending and quite extreme. I got to see it all, really, but it was known among my peers that I was an exception to their ways, and they didn't try to disrupt it. And if anyone tried to push me in other directions, they would step in and tell them to lay off. I think some even envied my party style of low maintenance/excitement, because I wasn't always broke and out by Monday. They were satisfied with helping to create a work monster instead, who could carry 2 sheets of 12' 5/8" drywall by himself, and keep up with feeding boards to two seasoned hangers slapping up stand-up sheets on commercial jobs, as fast as they could tack them up.

My music and creative ventures carried me thru with very little else. That and fishing. I have been a fishing addict all my life. I'm thinking now that a lot of my counterparts are wishing they had done that instead.
Mmmhmmm, that's a pretty nice collection of live shows, but ya
...some are at their best in the studio

I haven't kept track of all, or the # of bands I've seen, but I know I've attended over 1000 live music events, more than ¾ of them stadium/arena, and a year or 2 of weekend music festivals that run 40+ acts through 'em

Haha, you reminded me, aside from my folks bringing me to a Peter, Paul, & Mary show when I was like 4...Metallica was my 1st concert, aand it was definitely loud, with sound bigger than life & played for 4 hrs, no opening act...stoked

Being younger, I missed the dead's Wall of Sound (if any of y'all have heard of that)
but the audio at their shows never left me wanting, aand the bass was 2nd only to tHe orB's

Man you get PUMMELED by even infrasonic bass at orb shows. I've been standing there at outdoor shows, hearing nuthin', but with pant legs waving

Idk if I could ever properly explain myself, as far as my relationship with music, and near undying need for it to be max heaviness of jam/rocking & sophistication/intricacy, as well as the ever increasing/pushing the envelope factor

Actually, I'd say it's the Prankster experience. What was Ken Kesey's motto...Further, always further. Like a tree in the sun...always reaching for greater heights, never ceasing growth, always working toward getting better & stronger

Experiencing these situations where listening to music, surprisingly became more than just listening to music felt beneficial...like growth, or work being accomplished, maybe even the equivalent of weight lifting for the mind & soul...where we're becoming greater because of it

There's lots of "regular music" that no amount of listening to, in any manner or state, would be anything more than just hearing whatever tunes

These bands who get so much stuff going all at once, that the interactions of different parts with each other create or outline additional stuff in the empty spaces between them (perhaps?)

...that 3D+ fractal sound that coalesces at certain times, gives it like a treasure hunt, or discovery type element, like witnessing the northern lights, or a sailor discovering new lands

Even back in the days of stereo sound, Alex had some magical ability to make multidimensional music...fans joke about times where they've gotten up to look out a window, or walk into another room to figure what just made that sound

...that could've only come out of the 2 speakers directly in front of us. Listening in marantz all channel stereo 5.1.2 with front heights increases that exponentially (still gotta get my rear heights/ elevations) It's like yer flying or being beamed up through a wavy, pulsating tube of bio mechanical, paisley sound

I may eventually get around to seeing if I can tweak the neural x or any of those other weird ones to where it's better than all channel, but I suspect it would take a long time just to find out it's not possible

Even if engaging in such a musical experience doesn't really do anything that improves us in any way, I'd say what it does achieve is getting us 100% in the moment, aand that's perfect meditation...that's a high all on its own

Well...aand I suppose for musicians to always be striving to do something new/better & blow their audience's minds, is just natural. It doesn't make sense to set out to be mediocre as an artist, so I guess there's no need for me to feel guilty for being attracted to those who do that best from my pov & go sbove & beyond

Something you said last time,
"I don't discover music by working at, or altering my state of mind...etc"

I just realized that's not quite the angle I was coming from, and without ever experiencing it 1st hand, I don't see how anyone could even fathom what I mean (no judgement) but I don't believe that any & all music can create this effect, and it's just a matter of state of mind

...but music being done in such a manner, where any brain in its typical state, isn't able to process it fully...aand the changes the substances make to our minds, is REQUIRED as an aid for them to gain that ability

I've always openly admitted that, even knowing every single nook & cranny of every single OrB tune
...unless I'm in that psychedelic state...I'm not really "hearing" it. It's still great to listen to, but it becomes so much more with the adjustment

Aand they're not the only ones, but in my vast experience, they are the best. I don't see this ever happening to any musician(s) who aren't psychedelic freaks & doing it with intention & even many who are & do, can fall short
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
CSNY on my Wiim pro plus streamer. Marrakesh Express and Suite Judy Blue Eyes two of my all time favorites.
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
I have these on frequent play. Their newest EP is also very good, but I keep coming back to this one.

I listen to this album during the day at work. Great background while working
 
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Meticulous G

Meticulous G

Audioholic Intern
Aha...I went looking for a l'il more info on that Metallic Spheres album & noticed it came with a bonus disk mixed in "3D60" (which i haven't heard yet) and found an interview with one of the long orbiting members of the orb, (Youth) which happened in response to the release of a sort of updated version of the album ('cause they actually held back on the 1st one, sticking to pre-set paramaters) Metallic Spheres in Colour (which I've known about and have heard) which is also available in atmos through streaming (I heard it on Tidal, though admittedly, I didn't have my front heights in a the time, so not a proper listen iirc)

Anyway...he also goes into some detail about some of the unique & unconventional methods they've used since the beginning to make their recordings behave differently from what everyone else normally does, as far as engineering/production

 
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