MAXIMIZING THE USEFULNESS OF A HOME THEATER WITH 2 CENTER CHANNEL SPEAKERS

Status
Not open for further replies.
D

DCS0760

Junior Audioholic
Home Theater Design Setup

To maximize the usefulness of a single av receiver connected to a 3.1, 5.1 or 7.1, etc. speaker setup (utilizing 2 speakers as a center channel, located under the television). The same equipment will allow you to configure any of the speaker configurations already mentioned, but will also allow you to utilize/configure the existing 2 speakers being used as the center channel as front left and front right for a 2.0 or 2.1 configuration. (Please note, that you will still be able to configure/use the traditional Front Left and Front Right located on the sides of the screen for a 2.0 or 2.1 configuration)

This allows a user to have all the benefits of a 3.1, 5.1, 7.1, etc setup but have the option of a quieter/more intimate/subtle experience of a "centrally" positioned 2.0 or 2.1 set up; while still enjoying/benefiting from the quality of independent speakers (when compared to most soundbars). This also provides a more balanced listening experience to those seated on the sides of the screen.

This is accomplished by changing/manipulating the speaker configuration and speaker A/B function via the av receiver menu.

Receiver and speaker set up:

1-The Center channel output from the av receiver is connected to a speaker selector switch, splitting the signal from 1 to 2 (As has been mentioned in numerous other discussions and forums).

2-Connect speaker wire to the av receivers Speaker B connectors.

3-Utilize/incorporate an Automatic A/B source selector switch.

4-Connect the 2 center channel signals from step 1 to the input B on the Automatic source selector.

5-Connect the Speaker B wire from the av receiver to the input A on the Automatic source selector.

6-Connect the output L/R from the Automatic source selector to the two center channel speakers.


This can be simplified if there was an av receiver with 2 center channel connections and the ability to assign/switch their use between center or front right and front left.
 
Last edited:
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Staff member
There is no reason to go for two center channels. All that will do is introducing all kinds of lobing and comb-filtering into the sound, and destroy the original intended sound. It might make for a cool flanging or phasing sound effect though, depending on the distance between speakers.
 
D

DCS0760

Junior Audioholic
shadyj, i described the reason for the two center channels.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Why would one want to use two centers as L/R in any of the setups you list which would already have L/R speakers?
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
There is a REASON why receivers don't have two center channel outputs. Your proposal is to fix a problem that nobody has.
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
If I want to listen in 2 channel I switch to stereo on my avr. If I'd want (and I don't) 2.0 I'd set my mains to full range and turn the sub off. If I want intimate, I turn the volume down. What you're describing sounds like a complicated mess.
 
D

DCS0760

Junior Audioholic
Pogre,

the option for a 2.0 or 2.1 setup I describe (using the 2 centers) allows for a greater number of comfortable/balanced viewing/listening positions, particularly when set up using a larger television.
Which also provides a more intimate/subtle experience for those positioned on the sides of the television.
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
Well you're gonna have to s'plain it better because that first post didn't make a lot of sense to me. Right now I can't tell if you're using 4 speakers or 2 for 2.0 listening...
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Staff member
Pogre,

the option for a 2.0 or 2.1 setup I describe (using the 2 centers) allows for a greater number of comfortable/balanced viewing/listening positions, particularly when set up using a larger television.
Which also provides a more intimate/subtle experience for those positioned on the sides of the television.
Just because you can do that doesn't mean you should. There are acoustic reasons why you do not want tow speakers playing the exact same signal, especially when they are nearby each other. The thing to do instead is use a wide dispersion speaker. A lot of center channel speakers do not have good dispersion patterns off the direct axis. Your solution will create more problems than it solves, no offense. There is a significant body of scientific research on this. Read Dr. Floyd Toole's book 'Loudspeakers and Rooms' for starters.
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
Just because you can do that doesn't mean you should. There are acoustic reasons why you do not want tow speakers playing the exact same signal, especially when they are nearby each other. The thing to do instead is use a wide dispersion speaker. A lot of center channel speakers do not have good dispersion patterns off the direct axis. Your solution will create more problems than it solves, no offense. There is a significant body of scientific research on this. Read Dr. Floyd Toole's book 'Loudspeakers and Rooms' for starters.
Oh, I don't want to do it. I just wanted to see what he'd say. :D
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Pogre,

the option for a 2.0 or 2.1 setup I describe (using the 2 centers) allows for a greater number of comfortable/balanced viewing/listening positions, particularly when set up using a larger television.
Which also provides a more intimate/subtle experience for those positioned on the sides of the television.
While you may need to do this in your particular room with perhaps too many people in bad seats....It doesn't sound remotely attractive to do. I don't seat people to the sides of a tv for viewing or listening reasons, particularly an lcd tv which generally has poor off axis viewing anyways.
 
Bizarro_Stormy

Bizarro_Stormy

Audioholics Whac-A-Mole'er™
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
This person has joined 2 other audio/video forums today, and posted the same thing...

https://www.avforums.com/threads/maximizing-the-usefulness-of-a-home-theater-with-2-center-channel-speakers.2099472/

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/91-audio-theory-setup-chat/2837185-maximizing-usefulness-home-theater-2-center-channel-speakers.html

If there were any links in the original post, I would have deleted it as spam...

There aren't, so we'll get to see where this is going...

;)
He's really liking his "discovery" it seems....
 
D

DCS0760

Junior Audioholic
I am liking it. It has too many positive advantages and options to ignore. The design has no negatives or drawbacks. The only con one can come up with against the setup/design is the lobing (not sure if that is the correct word) effect argument that is produced by having two center channels; which I don't recognize or severely discount.
 
Last edited:
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Curious, what are the details of your room as far as dimensions, seating and display/speaker placement?
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Pogre,

the option for a 2.0 or 2.1 setup I describe (using the 2 centers) allows for a greater number of comfortable/balanced viewing/listening positions, particularly when set up using a larger television.
Which also provides a more intimate/subtle experience for those positioned on the sides of the television.
If that is true, then you have an absolutely horrible speaker system.

In any mode my system will go intimate to massive in any mode from 2.0 to 7.1. Two center channels is just plain daft.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Staff member
I am liking it. It has too many positive advantages and options to ignore. The design has no negatives or drawbacks. The only con one can come up with against the setup/design is the lobing (not sure if that is the correct word) effect argument that is produced by having two center channels; which I don't recognize or severely discount.
You have figured a clever way to wire the scheme for two center channels, but you haven't considered the acoustic problems. There is a reason why we only use one speaker per channel, and this science goes way back. Read up on lobing. Lobing is already a problem with conventional center speaker designs when they orient their drivers on a horizontal plane. Your idea takes that problem and makes it twice as bad for tweeter frequencies and literally four times as bad for woofer frequencies because you are compounding the horizontal drivers. Here is an article about the acoustic problems inherent with conventional center speakers; your solution makes that problem much worse.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top