Is there a better sub than the JL Gotham V2?

JerryLove

JerryLove

Audioholic Samurai
Now you just gettin silly. :p

IIRC, that requires a whole room just for it to work, right? So one room of your home becomes the Subwoofer cabinet. Yes... Yes indeed. :D
He did say price was no object. Just factor in the home extension.

 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Now you just gettin silly. :p

IIRC, that requires a whole room just for it to work, right? So one room of your home becomes the Subwoofer cabinet. Yes... Yes indeed. :D
You could just go infinite baffle instead....save some bucks if you have the spare room but not the $25k for the rotary job. :)
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Capable of frequencies below 1Hz, I give you: the rotary subwoofer :
I want to review one of those, but one problem is that my microphone does not dig deep enough to verify the manufacturers' claims. My mic is only good down to 9 Hz. The microphones needed to properly measure that thing would be pretty expensive.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
He did say price was no object. Just factor in the home extension.

You could just go infinite baffle instead....save some bucks if you have the spare room but not the $25k for the rotary job. :)
If you guys really wanted to go nuts, create a double bass array. That is where you cover one wall with drivers and also cover the opposite wall with drivers, but have one wall be in a delayed phase versus the other (depending on distance), so that one wall soaks up all of the output of the other like a perfect bass trap. What this does is creates a plane wave of pressure waves instead of having the subs be point source or even line source emitters. This pretty much gets rid of conventional room acoustics, so no standing waves or anything like that. Just the response of the transducers throughout the room. A club in Austria tried this and supposedly the results were very good, flat response, 7 Hz extension, with 140dB dynamic range.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Ninja
If you guys really wanted to go nuts, create a double bass array. That is where you cover one wall with drivers and also cover the opposite wall with drivers, but have one wall be in a delayed phase versus the other (depending on distance), so that one wall soaks up all of the output of the other like a perfect bass trap. What this does is creates a plane wave of pressure waves instead of having the subs be point source or even line source emitters. This pretty much gets rid of conventional room acoustics, so no standing waves or anything like that. Just the response of the transducers throughout the room. A club in Austria tried this and supposedly the results were very good, flat response, 7 Hz extension, with 140dB dynamic range.
Want.

;)
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
If you guys really wanted to go nuts, create a double bass array. That is where you cover one wall with drivers and also cover the opposite wall with drivers, but have one wall be in a delayed phase versus the other (depending on distance), so that one wall soaks up all of the output of the other like a perfect bass trap. What this does is creates a plane wave of pressure waves instead of having the subs be point source or even line source emitters. This pretty much gets rid of conventional room acoustics, so no standing waves or anything like that. Just the response of the transducers throughout the room. A club in Austria tried this and supposedly the results were very good, flat response, 7 Hz extension, with 140dB dynamic range.
Holy balls!!! 140db at 7hz? I’d think people would be getting sick!!!
 
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lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
If you guys really wanted to go nuts, create a double bass array. That is where you cover one wall with drivers and also cover the opposite wall with drivers, but have one wall be in a delayed phase versus the other (depending on distance), so that one wall soaks up all of the output of the other like a perfect bass trap. What this does is creates a plane wave of pressure waves instead of having the subs be point source or even line source emitters. This pretty much gets rid of conventional room acoustics, so no standing waves or anything like that. Just the response of the transducers throughout the room. A club in Austria tried this and supposedly the results were very good, flat response, 7 Hz extension, with 140dB dynamic range.
Kinda sounds like what Popalock did with his 18 SI HT18 drivers....before expanding :)
 
JerryLove

JerryLove

Audioholic Samurai
If you guys really wanted to go nuts, create a double bass array. That is where you cover one wall with drivers and also cover the opposite wall with drivers, but have one wall be in a delayed phase versus the other (depending on distance), so that one wall soaks up all of the output of the other like a perfect bass trap. What this does is creates a plane wave of pressure waves instead of having the subs be point source or even line source emitters. This pretty much gets rid of conventional room acoustics, so no standing waves or anything like that. Just the response of the transducers throughout the room. A club in Austria tried this and supposedly the results were very good, flat response, 7 Hz extension, with 140dB dynamic range.
I like this plan!
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Holy balls!!! 140db at 7hz? I’d think people would be getting sick!!!
I don't think they hit 7 Hz at 140 dB, I just think they had good extension down to 7 dB with a maximum dynamic range somewhere in the response of 140 dB. The cool thing about a system like that is that it negates room acoustics. It's almost like an anechoic chamber for bass (but only for the bass being emitted by one of the transducer walls). Traditional anechoic chambers are not truly anechoic down to low frequencies, since things like bass traps and absorbers can only neutralize pressure waves of something like a quarter wavelength of their depth.

Another advantage of a system like this is that there would be very little losses due to distance from source emission. Normal sound systems lose 6 dB of output for every doubling of distance that you get from them. Line source sound emitters lose 3 dB for every doubling of distance. I am guessing that a plane source would lose even less than that, if there are any losses at all. So the SPL, as well as the response, should be nearly the same where ever you are in the room.

You could probably make a double bass array that does do extremely low frequencies though, you would just need to use drivers with a very low resonant frequency. I bet you a wall of Stereo Integrity 24"s would create some very high levels of infrasonic frequencies. The cool thing about high amplitude extreme infrasonic sound pressure is it can respirate for you. That is awesome if you are really lazy and do not want to use your diaphragm muscles to in inhale and exhale. It's just so tiresome to breath on your own, you know what I mean? It has been shown that very high amplitude pressure waves of around 3 to 4 Hz can inject enough fresh air into your lungs that you do not have to deal with the tedium of breathing under your own power.
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
I don't think they hit 7 Hz at 140 dB, I just think they had good extension down to 7 dB with a maximum dynamic range somewhere in the response of 140 dB. The cool thing about a system like that is that it negates room acoustics. It's almost like an anechoic chamber for bass (but only for the bass being emitted by one of the transducer walls). Traditional anechoic chambers are not truly anechoic down to low frequencies, since things like bass traps and absorbers can only neutralize pressure waves of something like a quarter wavelength of their depth.

Another advantage of a system like this is that there would be very little losses due to distance from source emission. Normal sound systems lose 6 dB of output for every doubling of distance that you get from them. Line source sound emitters lose 3 dB for every doubling of distance. I am guessing that a plane source would lose even less than that, if there are any losses at all. So the SPL, as well as the response, should be nearly the same where ever you are in the room.

You could probably make a double bass array that does do extremely low frequencies though, you would just need to use drivers with a very low resonant frequency. I bet you a wall of Stereo Integrity 24"s would create some very high levels of infrasonic frequencies. The cool thing about high amplitude extreme infrasonic sound pressure is it can respirate for you. That is awesome if you are really lazy and do not want to use your diaphragm muscles to in inhale and exhale. It's just so tiresome to breath on your own, you know what I mean? It has been shown that very high amplitude pressure waves of around 3 to 4 Hz can inject enough fresh air into your lungs that you do not have to deal with the tedium of breathing under your own power.
This reminded me of a funny story. I have a lifelong friend here that owns a couple car audio shops and he demoed his comp truck(25 years ago) for my wife and I. It was a ford ranger with a topper sealed to the cab and the baffle holding six 15’s was about 4” behind the front seats. My wife drops into the passenger seat, and being summer time she had a tank top on. I don’t remember the track, but when it hit, her top wasn’t enough to hold her “girls” in. Lmao. She did barely catch them before anyone got a show but man, bass n boobs... good times!
 
T

TankTop5

Senior Audioholic
I experienced a pair of Focal Kanta’s with a single Rel T/9i, it was the most absurd thing I ever heard. It wasn’t until after I realized they had some type of bass shaker coupled to the chair. That’s a lot of bang for very little bucks.


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