Integration of amps w/AVR

Old Onkyo

Old Onkyo

Full Audioholic
So does this make sense?
Sometimes when listening to music I want it to “hit harder” not play louder.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
So does this make sense?
Sometimes when listening to music I want it to “hit harder” not play louder.
Maybe you need more dynamic speakers? Maybe just would prefer a different eq?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
Eq? Are you talking about a graphic equalizer?
No, not particularly a graphic eq....that's older tech than current eq tech. Just meant maybe you'd like certain parts of the spectrum emphasized; this isn't unusual at all especially at lower volume levels, reason why loudness contours have been around....does your avr have such and do you use it?
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Spartan
So does this make sense?
Sometimes when listening to music I want it to “hit harder” not play louder.
I have that same experience with B&W speakers. They always seem to be lacking just a little... something.
 
SPLaddict90

SPLaddict90

Audioholic Intern
in the past I have gotten speakers to "hit Harder" by adjusting the slope on the crossover points, and eq, messing around in the 200-500hz area on eq . this is where your mid bass will be affected. this was from my personal experience though.
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Spartan
in the past I have gotten speakers to "hit Harder" by adjusting the slope on the crossover points, and eq, messing around in the 200-500hz area on eq . this is where your mid bass will be affected. this was from my personal experience though.
I think the infamous "BBC dip" in the 1k to 5k frequency range is baked into some of B&W's speakers. Their top tier stuff is pretty amazing and have knocked my socks off but their entry to mid level offerings I've heard lack some impact in that range. I know when I replaced my older B&W DM 560s ('96-'98) it was like getting glasses for my ears.
 
Old Onkyo

Old Onkyo

Full Audioholic
in the past I have gotten speakers to "hit Harder" by adjusting the slope on the crossover points, and eq, messing around in the 200-500hz area on eq . this is where your mid bass will be affected. this was from my personal experience though.
How do I do this?
 
SPLaddict90

SPLaddict90

Audioholic Intern
In the manual it's probably listed under 'How to Blow Up Your Rec'r'. :D
why would adjusting this damage the receivers? do the receivers not have adjustable crossover slopes? real question as I currently do not have one
my current home audio set up is a 100w 2 channel fosi amp and a powered subwoofer running through a Dayton audio dsp so I have full control over crossover slopes and eq for every frequency band. so its great for music but as im going to surround sound is why I joined recently! so im learning too.
 
Alex2507

Alex2507

Audioholic Slumlord
why would adjusting this damage the receivers? do the receivers not have adjustable crossover slopes? real question as I currently do not have one
my current home audio set up is a 100w 2 channel fosi amp and a powered subwoofer running through a Dayton audio dsp so I have full control over crossover slopes and eq for every frequency band. so its great for music but as im going to surround sound is why I joined recently! so im learning too.
No adjustable slopes.

If you bump up the bass/mid bass on a speaker that is already dipping low in impedance with maybe not so great a phase angle, you suck up a lot of watts fast. Getting a speaker to 'hit harder' really just means turning it up louder. When you hone in on that 200-500 Hz range, there's already a lot going on and turning that up in particular uses more juice than turning up a frequency range that has less going on.

... AND ... using an EQ for 'gains' is generally viewed as a no-no.
 
SPLaddict90

SPLaddict90

Audioholic Intern
No adjustable slopes.

If you bump up the bass/mid bass on a speaker that is already dipping low in impedance with maybe not so great a phase angle, you suck up a lot of watts fast. Getting a speaker to 'hit harder' really just means turning it up louder. When you hone in on that 200-500 Hz range, there's already a lot going on and turning that up in particular uses more juice than turning up a frequency range that has less going on.

... AND ... using an EQ for 'gains' is generally viewed as a no-no.
ahhh. Gotcha so no adjustable slopes gotcha as far as eq I personally cut not Boost, I’m also running everything through amplifiers so I have my gain overlap set on the amp so even with a 3db boost i would never clip a speaker
 

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