Fiona Apple New CD in June

afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan

You will love this one....they stole a box from my house that had ALL of my Sarah McLachlan - at least 15 discs including one that was a custom made disc from some thing on one of the albums that you sent in to get bonus unreleased tracks of your choice. They got ALL of my Tori Amos, at least 10 discs. All of my Loreena McKennit. :( Collected those over many YEARS.
Man that truly sucks, damn I hope they catch those MOFOS. I thought they only took electronics, which is hard enuff, but music collection too. I know how you feel alot of my prized Vinyl and CD's were damaged with the dang salt water. It's almost a year and I still feel the pain. I had a Sarah concert VHS tape(RUINED),which I'd like to replace. Oh wow look: http://www.amazon.com/Touch-Hybrid-SACD-Sarah-Mclachlan/dp/B00EPLVZKO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1379171219&sr=8-1&keywords=Sarah+McLachlan+sacd
 
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afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
You will fall in love with her, lol Amber Rubarth - Novacaine - YouTube
WASHING DAY - Amber Rubarth Music Video - YouTube She sounds amazing in person, she writes all her own stuff, she used to be a chainsaw art artist, lol, 5 minutes with her and you can tell she is an old soul, deeper than most women her age, something special for sure... I like the unknown artists, you can go to a concert and hang out with the artists afterwards...
Wow Sun Studios. I went there and Graceland like ten years ago and loved it. I'm huge a Presley fan.:D I like her gonna see If she is touring in my area. She reminds me a bit of Michelle Shocked/Brandi Carlile I'll look into buying some of her stuff. I like meeting the artist too. I met Tina Dico, Nina Storey, Terence Trent D'arby(I'm a huge fan and a friend got me in to meet him) and alot of others that I can't remember at the moment. I met actor Heather Graham at a Fiona Apple concert back in 2005 on the WTP tour once and what a down to earth person she was. We chatted for a while. She is one tall chick and more beautiful in person. Good times indeed. :D
 
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ImcLoud

ImcLoud

Audioholic Ninja
Wow Sun Studios. I went there and Graceland like ten years ago and loved it. I'm huge a Presley fan.:D I like her gonna see If she is touring in my area. She reminds me a bit of Michelle Shocked/Brandi Carlile I'll look into buying some of her stuff. I like meeting the artist too. I met Tina Dico, Nina Storey, Terence Trent D'arby(I'm a huge fan and a friend got me in to meet him) and alot of others that I can't remember at the moment. I met actor Heather Graham at a Fiona Apple concert back in 2005 on the WTP tour once and what a down to earth person she was. We chatted for a while. She is one tall chick and more beautiful in person. Good times indeed. :D
I have been to sun studios twice, awesome history there... I got see the original " that's all right " recording, not hear it lol, just look, no touching... I think it sold for over a $100K recently.... Tina Dico is a dol, great voice on her, I cant belive I firgot to mention her...
 
ImcLoud

ImcLoud

Audioholic Ninja
LOL, its awesome I had to buy it... best .99 I spent today...
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
:eek:New song! https://soundcloud.com/powerpower/fiona-apple-untitled-i-want from the 1st show. Looks like a new album is in the works.


Portland Setlist:

Unknown)
(New song)
The First Taste
Every Single Night
(Unknown)
Anything We Want
Curable Disease
Regret
It'll All Work Out
(Unknown)
(New song)
It's Only Make Believe
(Conway Twitty cover)
(Unknown)
(New song)
Don't Tell Our Friends About Us
Left Alone
Encore:
Waltz (Better Than Fine)
 
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j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
She will be here next week. It is on a Tues. about an hour away or I would go.
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
Looks like some balcony seats are available for the Tues. show via ticketmaster. That falls on my bday too, you're lucky. Well no surprise I'm going to the NYC show. :)



 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
;)New song:
 
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afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
[h=1]Update[/h] [h=2]Fiona Apple[/h] [h=3]Following a heckling incident at the opening-night show of her current tour with Blake Mills last week, the singer talks about her ongoing struggle with public scrutiny: “If anyone gets in my way, I'm going to get them out of my way.”[/h] [h=4]By <a href="http://pitchfork.com/staff/carrie-battan/"><address>Carrie Battan</address> October 7, 2013[/h]
<small>Photo by Dan Monick</small>

“She’s very raw right now,” Fiona Apple’s publicist warns me repeatedly over the phone last Friday. Some rawness is warranted—the previous evening, an audience member at the opening night of the singer's new tour had interrupted her with an unsolicited suggestion, calling attention to Apple’s weight and appearance. “Fiona, get healthy! We want to see you in 10 years,” the fan yelled. “I saw you 20 years ago and you were beautiful.” By the next morning, reports that Apple kicked the woman out of the venue and struggled to finish the show were circulating online.
“I’m great and I’m terrible and I'm great and I'm terrible,” Apple says when she gets on the line, before apologizing for her hoarse post-show voice and “sounding like a monotonous curmudgeon.” But she seems clear-headed and reasonable, and the words she’s so often pegged to—“meltdown” and “fiasco,” to name a couple—quickly fall away. For someone who once said it’s an ordeal just to get out of her house and go to the grocery store, she sounds pretty at-ease on a cross-country tour bus. Especially since this is the point in the album cycle—a little more than a year after The Idler Wheel's release—where Apple would typically recede from the limelight altogether and retreat to her home in Venice, California, free from turbulent performances and strangers telling her she’s too skinny.
This time is different. Since the death of her dog Janet, Apple has been working to keep herself occupied. “I’m just eager to be around people so I don’t miss my dog,” she says. This primarily entails heading out on the road with songwriter/guitarist Blake Mills and a band for a tour called Anything We Want, which features songs from both Apple and Mills’ catalogues along with new music they wrote together; the tour picks up in the intimate, improvisational acoustic place The Idler Wheel left off, and one new song possibly titled “I Want You to Love Me” showcases Apple’s newfound fondness for unorthodox percussion. She explains that she's using “parts of trees” she collected in Venice and “beans that rattle” on stage. The performance is still a work-in-progress, but Apple is learning to embrace the disorder.
“Do they think I’m on drugs? That I have a life-threatening illness? That I’m anorexic? Emotionally, it doesn’t get easier to hear those criticisms—but it gets easier to be resolute about my reaction to it.”
Pitchfork: You’ve talked in the past about how you like doing absolutely nothing in between records. How has your frame of mind changed this time?
Fiona Apple: I’ve been trying to not be the same. I didn't want to go into hiding. I wanted to make some progress and have more fun and embrace the business part of this thing. It’s always been: I'll just be in the dark of my room and write these things and then I'll endure the rest of it. But I wanted to start to enjoy it. Not like, “You have to go on the road to support this thing,” but more like, “Let's take this show on the road!”
Pitchfork: What does enjoying it entail for you?
FA: I'm finding that out. I'm just going to try to keep my eyes focused on the people in the band and concentrate on the relationship that we have because I truly love them all. Life is all about the friendship and the love and the music. It sounds silly, but it is. I want to have that experience as much as I can as an adult, not as a kid doing something that people are telling her she has to do. If anyone gets in my way, I'm going to get them out of my way.
Pitchfork: The audience member in Portland who yelled out, “Get healthy, we want to see you in 10 years!”—is that someone who got in your way?
FA: Yeah, it was. She hurt my feelings. I don’t think what I look like is relevant. And by the way, this whole “unhealthy” thing has me baffled. It’s really confusing to me why anyone would have an opinion about that. And [the heckling] just takes you out of [the live performance]. People around me try to tell me that’s not going to happen, but it always happens. It’s really disappointing. I can’t laugh—I’m an emotional person. And I’m just very sensitive about that. Many people are, not just women. The heckler said, “I saw you 20 years ago, and you were pretty.” That’s just rude, and I don’t want her there anymore because it’s my stage, you know? I got very angry. But I’m going to try and be more prepared for that. I'm assuming that people are going to start to say those kinds of things just to egg me on now. Those people are going to have to leave if they interrupt me. I need to be able to do my job.
Pitchfork: Your weight and appearance have been discussed throughout your career. Has it gotten easier to deal with?
FA: No. It’s a sensitive subject because it’s not something that should be talked about, because there is nothing wrong with me. I’m healthy and I shouldn’t even have to say any of that. What makes me unhealthy and puts me in danger is that kind of scrutiny itself. It’s the same as being bullied at school, and just because you’re getting older, it doesn’t mean that you aren’t hurt by it. You could make anybody cry if you told them that they’re ugly.
I don’t even know what I’m being accused of. Do they think I’m on drugs? That I have a life-threatening illness? Do they think that I’m anorexic? At this point, emotionally, it doesn’t get easier to hear those criticisms—but it gets easier to be resolute about my reaction to it. Which is just: “Go ahead and call me ugly, call me skinny, call me crazy and speculate as much as you want, but not at a show.” I don’t think that there’s anything meltdown-y about that. I don’t have any problem getting angry at someone who insults me in the middle of a show.
Pitchfork: When something like that happens—or with something like the recent fashion party in Tokyo—do you worry about the fact that it’ll probably be news on the internet almost immediately?
FA: I’m not the Queen. I’m not a huge superstar, I don’t get paparazzi around me. So it doesn’t occur to me that they’re going to be talking about it the next day. But I do know that whatever it is won’t make me happy, so I don’t have my computer with me and I don’t look at that stuff. I anticipate the word “meltdown” and the predictable catch phrases that have been used my whole career, but it just makes me roll my eyes. But it’s another opportunity for me to grow and learn how to deal with stuff, which is probably what this whole career has been about for me—dealing with bullies at school. And I’m still not quite reflecting their power; I’m still affected by it.
As a person who performs on stage, it’s good to be emotionally open. If you mess with someone when they are in that state, it’s like you’re messing with an animal when it’s eating. What do they expect me to do? What am I supposed to do? Am I supposed to stop in the middle of my show and have a conversation with you about what I look like? What is the next line in this conversation that you have written in your head, lady? I feel bad for calling her a *****, and I always apologize for anything that I feel bad about, which is usually just reactionary cursing. But otherwise, I have nothing that I feel at all apologetic about from last night. Everything that happens with me gets made out to be a fiasco, but I have every right to do everything I’ve ever done. I stand by everything I’ve ever said, apologies included.
Pitchfork: You told me before that playing with a band at the L.A. venue Largo is a comfortable thing for you. Is this tour an attempt to recreate that safe space?
FA: Yeah, that’s kind of the idea. My career has been: first you have to prove yourself, then there’s the sophomore record, then there’s this thing and that thing, and you always want to be understood. Now it's just about fun and trying to step out of my own boundaries—trying to have fun and be part of a band, because that's really where joy is.
I didn’t want to be precious about things. Of course, the idea is to make great music, but if you have great musicians up there, it gives me some leeway to play around a little bit. I don't mind making a fool of myself. I felt like people would be accepting of that because, to me, that seems like an interesting way to do a show. I've always thought that it's interesting to watch people work things out on stage.
Pitchfork: You recently covered "Pure Imagination" from Willy Wonka for a Chipotle commercial, which seems out of character. How did that happen?
FA: Chipotle was in a big rush and they initially wanted Frank Ocean, but he screwed up his voice. And they wanted to use “Pure Imagination”, a song I wanted to do in a show when I was 18 but was too afraid to. I didn’t want Gene Wilder to be upset about that song being sung by some idiot. I thought that I had the best chance of doing it well. This is the absolute truth: The only person that I care what they think of the Chipotle commercial is Gene Wilder.
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
I'm guessing you didn't go JG? From LA show:


 
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afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
Went last night. Show started late 8:55 PM. Right before the show started I saw Quest Love(The Roots) and Zoey Kravitz(Actor/Singer) leave backstage. I was right by the backstage area 10th row. The show was almost 2 hours long. Not my fav. of her shows, but it was cool to hear new material. Fiona was quite happy through the show, but the weirdest I've seen her. Alot of banter and corney jokes from Fiona. At the end of the show she bought a fan on stage, which I thought was going to be an extra song, but no. They left together backstage. Then Fiona reemerged on the dark stage to get the same girls attention, then she was taken backstage again. Weird. Wonder who she was?
Blake's guitar playing was flawless, just not a fan of his voice.


Here are some pics I took. I was in the tenth row so I was pretty close with my Canon 30D:












 
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afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan


Posted in music on October 23, 2013

Fiona Apple played Beacon Theatre w/ Blake Mills and Questlove (night 2 review & setlist)

by Doug Moore
photo via Iva Boguslawska

Fiona Apple and Blake Mills brought their "Anything We Want" tour to NYC for two nights at Beacon Theatre this week -- Monday (10/21) and again last night (10/22). We caught night 2.
Apple's 2012 tour stopped in Terminal 5, which struck me at the time as an odd fit. That venue's sound system and acoustics are geared towards loud, pounding rhythms, which meant that Apple's more spare material was often overpowered by even relatively sparse percussion work. The Beacon, with its gentler acoustics and lighter touch on the mixing board, did her music a service.
Though Mills also opened and performed as a side musician for Apple on that tour, this jaunt changed the format -- instead of opening, Mills and Apple took the stage together and traded off songs throughout the set. I'm not wild about Mills's singing, but he's an excellent guitarist. The spiky rake rhythms and legato-heavy leads he added to Apple's tunes worked remarkably well, given the jazzy nature of the material, and he took a few borderline rock-god solo turns during his own songs. He also served as an emcee of sorts for the night -- whenever Apple's stage banter started to wander, he'd step in and move the set along.
Apple, for her part, seemed in good spirits and performed beautifully. (All this despite dressing like an old-school Charlotte Hornets fan out for a jog.) Her body language is often a little childlike, but it was especially so at this show; she'd shimmy her feet in place or hop up and down, like she was impatient for the next chord change. Her set drew from the breadth of her career, though her 2012 effort The Idler Wheel... received better representation than any of her other albums. Apple's band was also briefly joined by ?uestlove on drums for a blazing rendition of "Not About Love" from Extraordinary Machine, which established the set's emotional and aural high water mark.
We also covered this tour over at BV Chicago. In case you missed them, check out streams of new songs "I Want You To Love Me" and "Tipple" (both of which they performed last night),along with the setlist and a pic of Fiona and Questlove, below...

With Drummer Questlove.
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
Valentine's Day is just about two months down the road: On February 4, Hear Music/Concord Music Group will release the compilation Sweetheart 2014, featuring a bunch of big names covering older songs that tend toward the romantic. Highlights include Vampire Weekend doing Andrea Bocelli, Fiona Apple and her sister Maude Maggart doing Anton Karas, Phosphorescent doing Bob Dylan, Beck doing John Lennon, and a bunch more.

:DRead more: Listen: Fiona Apple, Vampire Weekend, Beck, Jim James, More on Starbucks Love Songs Covers Comp | News | Pitchfork
 
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j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
WTH? Figured if I was gonna see Fiona in TV/Movie, it would be a Tarantino movie.
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
WTH? Figured if I was gonna see Fiona in TV/Movie, it would be a Tarantino movie.
From what I read last night I guess she did the director a favor after he directed her music video for Every Single Night in France. I always thought she should have acted in movies or at least written one. I think she's been offered, but has turned it down.:(
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
New to my eyes. Nice interview:
 
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afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
Fiona's episode is out.
 
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