Equalizers - Analog or Digital your thoughts and opinions

Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
Gentlemen and ladies, Thought I would bring up this topic after having a long discussion last night with one of my sons, Would love to get your thoughts and opinions on this subject. So I will start by giving my take on this topic and let you know where I land
.
Bought my first system in 1980 ( man that seems like ages ago). Shortly there after, hearing a cousins almost identical system began my journey into equalizers. I have had some that were ok, some that were down right terrible and one that turned out to be just the ticket. Most imparted a sound signature and usually not for the best. Seems many people analog gives a warmth to the tone and digital can sometimes seem to thin out the signal or seem just a bit to cold.

After all the different ones I have tried, I fell back on keeping and using a RadioShack dual 15 band analog EQ. Like most of you right now I would probably be saying what, a RadioShack EQ. But i'm glad I tried this one. I would say this was purchased around the mid 80's. This unit is well built, single ended and balanced connections. And has an absolutely dead quiet noise floor. Does not impart any sort of tonal characteristics to the audio signal. Which is why I have kept this thing now for almost 35 yrs.
Seems like now a days, equalizers get a bad rap. I honestly think this is because most or should I say a lot of people are just not using them correctly. They seem to want to just start boosting everything up or making that smiley face on the settings. When in reality there should only be minor adjustments and sometimes (a lot) they are attenuating adjustments.

So I am in the camp of saying they are a very useful to and almost necessary tool for 2 channel (or 2.1) music listening. I say this because I have yet to hear that perfect speaker that doesn't need just a little tweaking. OK, feel free to chime in and beat me up on my analysis of the whole eq debate. Nothing said will hurt my feelings one way or another. All comments are welcomed and appreciated.
 
everettT

everettT

Audioholic Ninja
If you are EQing there is no excuse to not get digital dsp EQs like the minidsp.
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
If you are EQing there is no excuse to not get digital dsp EQs like the minidsp.
I could see that thought process. And I have tried different digital ones, but there is just something about them I do not like. I guess it's hard explain, but they seem to alter the natural music quality. In that regard, so do many analog eq's. Which is why I have kept this particular eq now for 35 some odd years, because it does not add nor take away any of the natural sound or detail. It would be hard to pry this one away from me.
I will always be open to trying new things, and with all my kids and their systems, there is never a shortage of new gear being rolled in and out. But thanks for your input and reply.
 
WaynePflughaupt

WaynePflughaupt

Audioholic Field Marshall
I’d agree that most EQ critics either don’t know how to use them or else got their hands on a bad one.

Just curious what digital equalizers have you used? My Yamaha YDP2006 blows away the best analog equalizers I’ve ever used. Check my signature for my review.

I wish my kids had an interest in hi-fi...

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
I’d agree that most EQ critics either don’t know how to use them or else got their hands on a bad one.

Just curious what digital equalizers have you used? My Yamaha YDP2006 blows away the best analog equalizers I’ve ever used. Check my signature for my review.

I wish my kids had an interest in hi-fi...

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Wayne, first off, don't wish to soon about your kids getting into hifi (lol). As we know it's a rather expensive and time consuming hobby. As far as digital eq's I have tried or borrowed and tried, I couldn't give you a specific model. I can only say at this point for one reason or another, I have yet to try one (digital) that pleases me or surpasses my oldie but goodie 35yr old analog. Yes I have heard many analog eq's that were also very disappointing. That's why I consider myself really lucky to have stumbled on this particular eq. It simply is the cleanest sounding one I have yet to hear.
I have no doubt there is probably a better one out there, just haven't had the opportunity to hear it yet. But I would be interested in trying the Yamaha you speak of. Yamaha has always held a good place in my heart for quality components. Maybe my buddy who owns Advanced audio here in town, may have one lying around or can get his hands on one for me to try.
Eq's are probably like speakers in one way, personal preference. I've had and tried so many speakers over the last 40 yrs. I get a little depressed think of all the money and time I've waisted. Not until after building my own speakers and 5 attempts am I now truly satisfied with my speakers.
Looks like your a guitarist, wish I had the delicate talent. Unfortunately I have the ears for listening, but not the skill of playing. You play it and I'll enjoy listening to it.
 
ellisr63

ellisr63

Audioholic
I am thinking that it is better to not introduce digital if you are a purist and your sources are analog only, but if your sources are digital , then use digital. I personally like digital EQ, as it is easy to set, and I do not hear a difference between the 2.

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
That's a pretty broad brush to paint all digital eq the same especially when you can't even come up with one you used....
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
That's a pretty broad brush to paint all digital eq the same especially when you can't even come up with one you used....
Not sure what broad brush I was painting except for my personal preference. And I take no offense nor do I think you meant any offense. You are right about not naming any digital ones, I also didn't name any analog ones. Except the one that has been left in my systems for a long time. If I use something and I don't like or keep it. It shortly is erased from my memory. I couldn't even tell you the model number of the one I still have without pulling it out and looking at the back. I just don't feel the need to do so, because im happy with it. Until it gives me a problem or I run across something better, it stays where it lays.
But in case I somehow made it unclear. I am in no way saying that there are not better digital ones out there. In fact I hope there is because this one can not last much longer. 35 yrs is a long time for a piece of audio equipment. So im not fooling myself in any way, I know the day is coming when I go to turn it on and it's going to fail. So if I did come off as trying to paint a broad brush against digital, well my apologies, that was not my intent.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
I'm saying that there's simply not much to talk about aside from your preference for the unit you're using, let alone your impression of whatever digital eq you used or how you used it. Glad you enjoy your old eq unit still, that's a pretty long time for one. Don't miss my old Audio Control analog eq. Do use some digital eq, tho. Do you just judge use by ear alone or did you use measurement mics somewhere among them?
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
I'm saying that there's simply not much to talk about aside from your preference for the unit you're using, let alone your impression of whatever digital eq you used or how you used it. Glad you enjoy your old eq unit still, that's a pretty long time for one. Don't miss my old Audio Control analog eq. Do use some digital eq, tho. Do you just judge use by ear alone or did you use measurement mics somewhere among them?
Yes, it's a very long time for one to last and never have an issue. No, I don't use any sort of measurement tools, just my ears, since I believe that what we hear is the final and best judgement anyway. That's why I take a lot of companies advertised spec's with a grain of salt. We all know how they like to exaggerate and fudge those numbers to look good on paper. I'm pretty lucky to still have great hearing. In fact my last hearing test a few months back to forever because this new ear-nose-throat doctor couldn't believe my hearing was so good. I've just really judged past eq's by, being able to hear any sort of artifacts, changes in tone, or any sort of minor hiss etc. I guess im pretty lucky this old unit is the quietest, dead black noise floor and great separation stereo image of any that I have ever heard or tried. Hope im lucky and this thing holds out for a few more years.
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
Gentlemen and ladies, Thought I would bring up this topic after having a long discussion last night with one of my sons, Would love to get your thoughts and opinions on this subject. So I will start by giving my take on this topic and let you know where I land
.
Bought my first system in 1980 ( man that seems like ages ago). Shortly there after, hearing a cousins almost identical system began my journey into equalizers. I have had some that were ok, some that were down right terrible and one that turned out to be just the ticket. Most imparted a sound signature and usually not for the best. Seems many people analog gives a warmth to the tone and digital can sometimes seem to thin out the signal or seem just a bit to cold.

After all the different ones I have tried, I fell back on keeping and using a RadioShack dual 15 band analog EQ. Like most of you right now I would probably be saying what, a RadioShack EQ. But i'm glad I tried this one. I would say this was purchased around the mid 80's. This unit is well built, single ended and balanced connections. And has an absolutely dead quiet noise floor. Does not impart any sort of tonal characteristics to the audio signal. Which is why I have kept this thing now for almost 35 yrs.
Seems like now a days, equalizers get a bad rap. I honestly think this is because most or should I say a lot of people are just not using them correctly. They seem to want to just start boosting everything up or making that smiley face on the settings. When in reality there should only be minor adjustments and sometimes (a lot) they are attenuating adjustments.

So I am in the camp of saying they are a very useful to and almost necessary tool for 2 channel (or 2.1) music listening. I say this because I have yet to hear that perfect speaker that doesn't need just a little tweaking. OK, feel free to chime in and beat me up on my analysis of the whole eq debate. Nothing said will hurt my feelings one way or another. All comments are welcomed and appreciated.
I sometimes indulge the iTunes equalizer for all day playlists in a particular genre. This gets the dynamics to where listener fatigue does not set in. This is particularly attractive when I am listening to Bach Cello and Violin performances.
 
B

baronvonellis

Audioholic
Have you ever changed the caps out on that 35 year old EQ? If it's that old all the caps are probably bad and out of spec by now. I'd recommend a parametric eq if you are EQing, it's much more flexible than a graphic eq. You can dial in the exact frequencies you want to adjust, and the bandwidth of frequencies that you want it to affect. Doing it by ear is fine, almost every record was mixed and EQed by ear after all.
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
Have you ever changed the caps out on that 35 year old EQ? If it's that old all the caps are probably bad and out of spec by now. I'd recommend a parametric eq if you are EQing, it's much more flexible than a graphic eq. You can dial in the exact frequencies you want to adjust, and the bandwidth of frequencies that you want it to affect. Doing it by ear is fine, almost every record was mixed and EQed by ear after all.
No, I have not. For that matter I have never even removed the cover. Never felt the need since it has never given me any issues. Is it out of spec? Good possibility it is due to it's age. However since it still sounds great, I wont worry about it until I have an issue. Then I will mostly likely replace it, but there is always a chance I might just have it repaired. I know a new one would probably be cheaper than any repairs that might be needed. So I will face that issue when the time comes. Appreciate the feedback.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
I’d agree that most EQ critics either don’t know how to use them or else got their hands on a bad one.

Just curious what digital equalizers have you used? My Yamaha YDP2006 blows away the best analog equalizers I’ve ever used. Check my signature for my review.

I wish my kids had an interest in hi-fi...

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
The YDP2006 EQ is probably similar to the Parametric EQ (PEQ) found in all the Yamaha AVRs and Pre-pros.

I use and enjoy the Yamaha PEQ also, but only for the bass region 15Hz - 80Hz.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
Analog EQ is not necessary but it is nice to have. I am 'not' the guy who arranged it to the smiley configuration. I hover around flat. and fine tune from there. Usually, it's genre, and even more specifically artist tuning. I am usually running bass settings flat, but will EQ bass out, rather than add more to it so the 3-4 bands in the bass region rarely get touched. On electric guitar heavy selections, I usually end up sweetening the mid range a bit and that ends up being the most I use the EQ for. Also, a nudge south of flat on the upper frequencies, will remedy almost any "bright" speaker I have ever come across, and without sacrifice.
 
Truthslayer

Truthslayer

Junior Audioholic
Analog EQ is not necessary but it is nice to have. I am 'not' the guy who arranged it to the smiley configuration. I hover around flat. and fine tune from there. Usually, it's genre, and even more specifically artist tuning. I am usually running bass settings flat, but will EQ bass out, rather than add more to it so the 3-4 bands in the bass region rarely get touched. On electric guitar heavy selections, I usually end up sweetening the mid range a bit and that ends up being the most I use the EQ for. Also, a nudge south of flat on the upper frequencies, will remedy almost any "bright" speaker I have ever come across, and without sacrifice.
Ya, I only use the eq now a days to remove the bass from 50hz and under from the main speakers, and let the sub do the job it's supposed to do.
 

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