Denon AVR-X4400H & AVR-X6400H AV Receivers Add Alexa Integration

gene

gene

Audioholics Master Chief
Administrator
The Denon AVR-X4400H and AVR-X6400H, boast the highest quality build, components and power output within their new series of AV receivers. These new models integrate HEOS whole-house music playback and are some of the first AVRs on the market enabled to support Amazon Alexa’s Smart Home Skill for Entertainment Devices. Ultra HD 4K Video? Immersive Audio? Yea they've got that. In fact, both models support 11.2 channels of processing so the end user can utilize a full 7.2.4 speaker configuration. Denon leaves very little to be desired with their latest AV receivers.

denon-6400-top.jpg


Read: Denon AVR-X4400H & AVR-X6400H AV Receivers Add Alexa Integration
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
I think many of us would like to see you bench test the AVR-X4300H or AVR-X4400H to find out if their preamp sections are a little better better than the AVR-X3300W's and comparable to that of equivalent Yamaha, Marantz and Anthem models. I mean in terms of preout voltage level vs THD, SNR, slew rate, cross talk, etc.
 
Last edited:
C

Chili

Audiophyte
I'm with Peng- A lot of us would sincerely appreciate seeing the results / comparisons of the AVR-X4300H or AVR-X4400H and how they compare with AVR-X3300W and to Yamaha, Marantz and Anthem models. I'm really stuck between choosing Marantz and Denon. Thanks in advance if the tests are done.
 
agarwalro

agarwalro

Audioholic Ninja
I think this is a great idea.

IMO, go even further, for any AVR with pre-outs, bench test the pre-amp like you would a dedicated pre-pro.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
I think this is a great idea.

IMO, go even further, for any AVR with pre-outs, bench test the pre-amp like you would a dedicated pre-pro.
That would be nice to know. I've got a 4300h so this is of particular interest to me.
 
A

ArJuna

Audiophyte
Hi Peng. I've had many Denon AVR's including the AVR-X3300W and the AVR-X4300H. The X4300H was an upgrade on the same 7.2.2 Klipsch Reference Premiere speaker arrangement. I will state that the sound quality of either AVR was spectacular and that I did not notice any difference except for the slight gain in power from 105w to 125w. I ran this setup both with and without the use of a Russound external amp to power the mains. You cannot go wrong with either AVR.
 
mattlach

mattlach

Junior Audioholic
Ugh. DO NOT WANT.

I'll keep that digital assistant smart speaker nonsense off my network at any cost, even if it means never buying another Denon receiver.
 
KenM10759

KenM10759

Audioholic Samurai
Ugh. DO NOT WANT.

I'll keep that digital assistant smart speaker nonsense off my network at any cost, even if it means never buying another Denon receiver.
I would view not buying another Denon receiver because of that to be a good thing. :D

There is enough oversight in my life right now. I do not want my own network listening to me.
 
S

snakeeyes

Audioholic Ninja
I would view not buying another Denon receiver because of that to be a good thing. :D

There is enough oversight in my life right now. I do not want my own network listening to me.
I don’t mind the audio system listening to me. As long as it sounds good! :)
 
KenM10759

KenM10759

Audioholic Samurai
Too many stories of Alexa giving away too much info. I'm not into that. You go ahead.
 
mattlach

mattlach

Junior Audioholic
Too many stories of Alexa giving away too much info. I'm not into that. You go ahead.

Yep. There's one way to guarantee a product, any product is going nowhere near my home. If it says "Alexa" on the box.
 
G

grimlock212

Audiophyte
You guys seem to misunderstand the Denon side of this. Your Denon doesn’t listen to you at all, you need to buy a separate Alexa device to do this (like an Alexa Dot). Then with the proper skill (app) installed on your Alexa device, you can make some vocal commands that the Alexa device will use to control your AVR. Don’t want Alexa listening to you? Don’t buy the Alexa device. The Denon doesn’t listen at all by itself.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
KenM10759

KenM10759

Audioholic Samurai
Still zero interest in Denon receivers at this point. The whole AVR race to get as many labels/logos as possible on the front sticker array is a big turnoff for me. What is the cost of that versus giving me the choice of what I want and need?
 
G

grimlock212

Audiophyte
Still zero interest in Denon receivers at this point. The whole AVR race to get as many labels/logos as possible on the front sticker array is a big turnoff for me. What is the cost of that versus giving me the choice of what I want and need?
If you don’t want the features, just get an entry level unit. I don’t see anything different today than when I bought my first Denon 25 years ago. Back then you wanted the cutting edge Dolby AC-3, and you had to pay big money back then if you wanted THX from Denon. I settled for the AVR-3600 and AC-3.

Or buy an older used unit. I still have that 3600 that I could sell, and a couple of other AVRs sitting around.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
KenM10759

KenM10759

Audioholic Samurai
Or, buy one that can be upgraded for at least five years. That's what I did.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
The whole AVR race to get as many labels/logos as possible on the front sticker array is a big turnoff for me. What is the cost of that versus giving me the choice of what I want and need?
I agree with you in theory. Reality is, the cost of "that" is actually lower, may be significantly lower, than that to give yo the choice of what you want and need. Just look at Marantz receivers versus their own prepro, I know very well because I owned two of their prepros, never again!! Also look at how much Denon/Marantz charge for even a single feature upgrade via firmware, or hardware, vs wait a year to get the next year model. You can go the NAD route (only seem to work recently), but you would have paid more for the initial purchase, and get less. Getting less is fine if you don't need those stuff and could actually be a good thing, but paying more is not something everyone would want to do.
 
M Code

M Code

Audioholic General
A possible solution for all the various, audio, video, connectivity, room EQ SW protocols can easily be addressed by the major brands...:oops:
Make each 1 a download option, include the subject royalty in the download so then the user can select what he wants depending upon his requirements. If he wants Dolby Digital and Dolby HD Audio but not Atmos, why pay for 1 that he doesn't want. So now the user can customize his AVR to address his own preferences..

Just my $0.02... ;)
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
A possible solution for all the various, audio, video, connectivity, room EQ SW protocols can easily be addressed by the major brands...:oops:
Make each 1 a download option, include the subject royalty in the download so then the user can select what he wants depending upon his requirements. If he wants Dolby Digital and Dolby HD Audio but not Atmos, why pay for 1 that he doesn't want. So now the user can customize his AVR to address his own preferences..

Just my $0.02... ;)
Great idea! That could be cost effective though there would still be some cost involved by the brands in order to make the product ready for such upgrades via FW. Other than that, aside from things like HDMI, and maybe a few other things that require new hardware, it could be a win win for the brands and consumers. They, or at least D&M, are actually doing it now (e.g. Auro-3D, eARC) but to an extremely limited extent.
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
A possible solution for all the various, audio, video, connectivity, room EQ SW protocols can easily be addressed by the major brands...:oops:
Make each 1 a download option, include the subject royalty in the download so then the user can select what he wants depending upon his requirements. If he wants Dolby Digital and Dolby HD Audio but not Atmos, why pay for 1 that he doesn't want. So now the user can customize his AVR to address his own preferences..

Just my $0.02... ;)
I like the idea, but wonder how viable or significant it would be:
Do you have any sense of how much of the cost of an AVR goes to the royalties for these options?
I've always assumed it was pretty low because the inexpensive AVR's seem to have about the same ones as the top end AVRs (aside from Audyssey versions).
Do the AVR manufacturers broker lower prices (quanitity doscounts) for the royalties since they will go in every AVR.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
I like the idea, but wonder how viable or significant it would be:
Do you have any sense of how much of the cost of an AVR goes to the royalties for these options?
I've always assumed it was pretty low because the inexpensive AVR's seem to have about the same ones as the top end AVRs (aside from Audyssey versions).
Do the AVR manufacturers broker lower prices (quanitity doscounts) for the royalties since they will go in every AVR.
Regardless, for such scheme to work, manufacturers would have to make the upgrade price affordable. As it is now, D&M charges $199 for the Auro-upgrade for the 2016 model just as an example. So for those who need that feature, that's the additional cost for not waiting for the 2017 models.
 
newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top