Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
So exactly a year to the day after Ole Biden stated that if you were fully vaxed and boosted you wouldn't get COVID, he has gotten the WuFlu..........
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
So exactly a year to the day after Ole Biden stated that if you were fully vaxed and boosted you wouldn't get COVID, he has gotten the WuFlu..........
Yet again you post falsehood in this thread and are straight out lying.

Bidens comments on vaccination have been consistent, and here is one a little over a year ago. The other I saw are similar.


>>>...But the good news is that our vaccinations are highly effective. Fully vaccinated Americans have a high degree of protection, including against this Delta variant. ...<<<
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
and yet again you are full of poop !!


Thanks for the 'dumb' marker, coming from you that means so much ........ :p
When I think of hateful bigoted Republican men you comes to mind as an example.

Here are some other Biden remarks saying that vaccines are effective, and this is the position Biden and his administration has:



 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
When I think of hateful bigoted Republican men you comes to mind as an example.

Here are some other Biden remarks saying that vaccines are effective, and this is the position Biden and his administration has:



Numbnuts, I picked up but 'one' little bit of factual trivia that just happened to have a date stamp associated with it, nothing more, and you feel compelled to come back with your mountain of horsecrap. I wasn't referring to that, understood ?? !! You were so quick to pounce on my first post how come you're not dwelling on it now ??
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Overlord
Follow up: Today is day 3 since her "exposure" and she tested negative today. I know it's a little soon to declare victory. She has another test that I'm expecting her to do on Saturday night or Sunday sometime.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Samurai
Getting Moderna as the second booster. I'd thought I'd been slagging but turned out my six months since the last just passed.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
My wife and I were traveling this weekend, and she just tested positive on a home test. Even though I tested negative on a home test, I strongly suspect I have it because we have almost identical symptoms (chills, sore throat, body aches). Her symptoms started this morning whereas mine started a few hours ago later in the day.

It's a little like being on a new rollercoaster just as it's starting at the top of the run. You don't really lknow what to expect. We're both vaxed and boosted, no significant health problems, etc., but who knows?
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
My wife and I were traveling this weekend, and she just tested positive on a home test. Even though I tested negative on a home test, I strongly suspect I have it because we have almost identical symptoms (chills, sore throat, body aches). Her symptoms started this morning whereas mine started a few hours ago later in the day.

It's a little like being on a new rollercoaster just as it's starting at the top of the run. You don't really lknow what to expect. We're both vaxed and boosted, no significant health problems, etc., but who knows?
I've been hearing that with the latest variants, people may not get a positive on a rapid test until after 2-3 days of symptoms. As you indicated, one never knows for certain how it will turn out. But, if you are both healthy and vaccinated & boosted, the odds are strongly in your favour.

Until December of last year, I didn't know a single person who had contracted COVID. Since then - plenty. None have been severely affected. My parents and in-laws (late 70's to mid-80's) have recently had it and all recovered none the worse for wear.

My daughter was ill recently and we isolated her as the household leper, despite testing negative for several days. She finally went to a clinic and it turned out that she had strep throat.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
I've been hearing that with the latest variants, people may not get a positive on a rapid test until after 2-3 days of symptoms. As you indicated, one never knows for certain how it will turn out. But, if you are both healthy and vaccinated & boosted, the odds are strongly in your favour.

Until December of last year, I didn't know a single person who had contracted COVID. Since then - plenty. None have been severely affected. My parents and in-laws (late 70's to mid-80's) have recently had it and all recovered none the worse for wear.

My daughter was ill recently and we isolated her as the household leper, despite testing negative for several days. She finally went to a clinic and it turned out that she had strep throat.
I tested positive today so I called my doctor and he said he'd send the pharmacy a prescription for Paxlovid. My wife already has a prescription for Paxlovid so she started on it already.

A person I know who had a severe case of COVID suggested Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and possibly Pepsid in the morning. Based on brief online search I didn't see any reported drug interactions between either of these and Paxlovid, but I'm a little wary of following advice from people who are not medical professionals (basically, I'm paging @Swerd and @TLSGuy to see if they are willing to comment).
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
I tested positive today so I called my doctor and he said he'd send the pharmacy a prescription for Paxlovid. My wife already has a prescription for Paxlovid so she started on it already.

A person I know who had a severe case of COVID suggested Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and possibly Pepsid in the morning. Based on brief online search I didn't see any reported drug interactions between either of these and Paxlovid, but I'm a little wary of following advice from people who are not medical professionals (basically, I'm paging @Swerd and @TLSGuy to see if they are willing to comment).
If you want to reach TLS Guy fast, I suggest that you edit your post to show a space between TLS and Guy. :)
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
I tested positive today so I called my doctor and he said he'd send the pharmacy a prescription for Paxlovid. My wife already has a prescription for Paxlovid so she started on it already.

A person I know who had a severe case of COVID suggested Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and possibly Pepsid in the morning. Based on brief online search I didn't see any reported drug interactions between either of these and Paxlovid, but I'm a little wary of following advice from people who are not medical professionals (basically, I'm paging @Swerd and @TLSGuy to see if they are willing to comment).
You could ask your pharmacist about any possible interactions.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
If you want to reach TLS Guy fast, I suggest that you edit your post to show a space between TLS and Guy. :)
Good point! Paging @TLS Guy: Any comments you may have concerning taking Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and Pepsid in the morning whilst taking Paxlovid would be appreciated (yes, I'm shamelessly attempting to curry favor with TLS Guy by using "whilst").
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Good point! Paging @TLS Guy: Any comments you may have concerning taking Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and Pepsid in the morning whilst taking Paxlovid would be appreciated (yes, I'm shamelessly attempting to curry favor with TLS Guy by using "whilst").
did you run this by your 'GP' ? I'd think that is where your first trust would lie ?

Good luck to you and your wife in getting over this !!
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
did you run this by your 'GP' ? I'd think that is where your first trust would lie ?
I will ask my GP about it, but he tends to be somewhat unresponsive at times so I'm not sure I'll get an answer any time soon.

"Good luck to you and your wife in getting over this !!" Thanks. We're both vaxxed and neither of us have any significant risk factors (other than possibly age for me, I'm in my late 50s)(my wife is about 10 years younger than me). So, I'm optimistic we'll pull through it without too much difficulty.

Having said that, I know a guy who is in his mid 40s who had a lot of long term neurological problems due to COVID. As far as I know, he didn't have any significant health problems before getting COVID. He was in and out of ER for quite a long time, and it's taken him almost a year to get back to being somewhat normal. He had seen numerous specialists, including a neurologist, but they were never able to to figure out what was causing all the problems. My take on it is that there's a lot we still don't know about COVID.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Based on some google research, it' not clear to me that Paxlovid provides significant benefits for those who are vaxxed and "standard risk."

>>>And questions have grown about whether Paxlovid helps those who aren’t at high risk of serious disease—Pfizer earlier this month halted a large trial of the drug in standard risk COVID-19 patients because it was failing to show statistically significant protection against death or hospitalization.<<<

https://www.science.org/content/article/bad-news-paxlovid-coronavirus-can-find-multiple-ways-evade-covid-19-drug

Here's a snip from the Phizer press release:

>>>In the EPIC-SR study of PAXLOVID™(nirmatrelvir [PF-07321332] tablets and ritonavir tablets), the novel primary endpoint of self-reported, sustained alleviation of all symptoms for four consecutive days was not met, as previously reported<<<

Off hand, this surprises me somewhat. If Paxlovid stops reproduction of the virus, I would have expected it to reduce symptoms as well.

I'm going to keep taking Paxlovid as "insurance" against severe COVID, but it sounds like I can't expect it to significantly reduce symptoms.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Based on some google research, it' not clear to me that Paxlovid provides significant benefits for those who are vaxxed and "standard risk."

>>>And questions have grown about whether Paxlovid helps those who aren’t at high risk of serious disease—Pfizer earlier this month halted a large trial of the drug in standard risk COVID-19 patients because it was failing to show statistically significant protection against death or hospitalization.<<<

https://www.science.org/content/article/bad-news-paxlovid-coronavirus-can-find-multiple-ways-evade-covid-19-drug

Here's a snip from the Phizer press release:

>>>In the EPIC-SR study of PAXLOVID™(nirmatrelvir [PF-07321332] tablets and ritonavir tablets), the novel primary endpoint of self-reported, sustained alleviation of all symptoms for four consecutive days was not met, as previously reported<<<

Off hand, this surprises me somewhat. If Paxlovid stops reproduction of the virus, I would have expected it to reduce symptoms as well.

I'm going to keep taking Paxlovid as "insurance" against severe COVID, but it sounds like I can't expect it to significantly reduce symptoms.
Maybe in a healthy, fully vaxxed & boosted person, the body's own immune response reduces/eliminates the virus at a rate that renders the boost offered by Paxlovid redundant.

Coincidentally, I just read this article this morning: COVID-19 medication Paxlovid available in N.S., but you have to know where to look | CBC News

Dr. Lisa Barrett*, infectious diseases doctor and researcher, is one of two people leading the therapy recommendation group and prioritization group for high-risk COVID-19 patients in the province.

"The first principle of any treatment is that you want to give it to the people who get the most benefit and the least amount of harm," Barrett said Thursday. "And that's the way we determined who would be getting these medications."

Barrett said patients eligible for Paxlovid are usually older, have underlying problems with their immune system, have multiple health conditions and may not be fully vaccinated.

"Those who are at highest risk for becoming hospitalized or dying are the people for whom the benefit of Paxlovid is greater than the risk of the drug itself," she said. "And it's not a medication without some significant challenges in that there are many, many drug interactions with other medications that people commonly take."
*She did some of her research training under Dr. Fauci at the NIH. She has some credibility.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I tested positive today so I called my doctor and he said he'd send the pharmacy a prescription for Paxlovid. My wife already has a prescription for Paxlovid so she started on it already.

A person I know who had a severe case of COVID suggested Benadryl at night to slow down the histamine response, and possibly Pepsid in the morning. Based on brief online search I didn't see any reported drug interactions between either of these and Paxlovid, but I'm a little wary of following advice from people who are not medical professionals (basically, I'm paging @Swerd and @TLSGuy to see if they are willing to comment).
Sorry to hear you've got Covid-19. If you haven't already started taking Paxlovid, get started on it asap. Before prescribing Paxlovid, my doc asked me to name every prescription drug I took, to see what adverse interaction might happen. Later, when I picked up the drug, the pharmacist asked the same questions. If you have any questions about other drugs that might interact with Paxlovid, the pharmacist should know answers.

I have no idea what adverse reactions might occur with Paxlovid and Benadryl or Pepsid. I also don't see how either of those might benefit you. Benadryl will help dry up nasal secretions as well as most other secretions. It can also help you sleep. I avoid it because it makes me feel drowsy and drugged for a long time the next day. I don't see how Pepsid has any affect on Covid-19.

When I had Covid-19 last May, I took ibuprofen for aches & fever, and Mucinex DM to suppress coughing. It helped me sleep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nirmatrelvir/ritonavir#Interactions_and_side_effects
Co-administration with certain drugs may have serious effects and may sometimes be fatal. The drug is contraindicated in those with hypersensitivity to the two main components, with severely reduced kidney or liver function, co-administered with certain drugs, such as those dependent on CYP3A for removal for which a raised concentration results in serious reactions, or those with potent CYP3A inducers for which reduced blood concentration of the two main components may result in loss of effect against the virus and possible resistance, among others. Co-administration also affects the concentration of several drugs, sometimes requiring changing the dose or careful monitoring. Many of these drugs are widely prescribed to people at high risk from COVID-19.
Ritonavir exhibits hepatic activity. Ritonavir induces CYP1A2 and inhibits the major P450 isoforms 3A4 and 2D6. Concomitant therapy of ritonavir with a variety of medications may result in serious and sometimes fatal drug interactions. Due to it being a strong inhibitor (that causes at least a five-fold increase in the plasma AUC values [AUC = area under the curve], or more than 80% decrease in clearance) [increased AUC and decreased clearance lead to increased total exposure to a drug] of both Cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, ritonavir can severely potentiate and prolong the serious and life-threatening side-effects of the opioid painkiller Oxycodone.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Sorry to hear you've got Covid-19. If you haven't already started taking Paxlovid, get started on it asap. Before prescribing Paxlovid, my doc asked me to name every prescription drug I took, to see what adverse interaction might happen. Later, when I picked up the drug, the pharmacist asked the same questions. If you have any questions about other drugs that might interact with Paxlovid, the pharmacist should know answers.

I have no idea what adverse reactions might occur with Paxlovid and Benadryl or Pepsid. I also don't see how either of those might benefit you. Benadryl will help dry up nasal secretions as well as most other secretions. It can also help you sleep. I avoid it because it makes me feel drowsy and drugged for a long time the next day. I don't see how Pepsid has any affect on Covid-19.

When I had Covid-19 last May, I took ibuprofen for aches & fever, and Mucinex DM to suppress coughing. It helped me sleep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nirmatrelvir/ritonavir#Interactions_and_side_effects




Thanks. I took Benadryl the first day I had symptoms, but I didn't notice much of an effect so I stopped taking it. I didn't try Pepsid.

I started Paxlovid the day after I first developed symptoms. I first noticed symptoms Tuesday night but I tested negative on Tuesday. I tested positive on Wednesday and started Paxlovid on Wednesday.

I was almost positive I had it on Tuesday despite the negative test because my wife had already tested positive. I could see how a negative test could lead someone to incorrectly conclude that they don't have it and miss the 5 day window to start Paxlovid.

The Paxlovid does seem to cause a bad taste in my mouth. For lack of a better term, I'd describe is as "metallic." It's not too bad though.

The headaches and fatigue have mostly subsided, but the chills/sweating at night have persisted. I'm trying to get plenty of sleep, but the chills/sweating make it difficult.

The first day my temperature was up to 102, but it dropped to around 100 the next day and it's close to normal now. My resting heart rate the second day was around 70-75 bpm. It's down to about 55 bpm now, but that's still a little above normal (45-50 bpm).
 
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