Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Well, there are T cells from prior infections with human coronaviruses that cause the common cold:

>>>T Cells From Common Colds Cross-Protect Against Infection With SARS-CoV-2

People with higher levels of T cells from common cold coronaviruses are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2.

A new study, published in Nature Communications and led by Imperial College London researchers, provides the first evidence of a protective role for these T cells. While previous studies have shown that T cells induced by other coronaviruses can recognise SARS-CoV-2, the new study examines for the first time how the presence of these T cells at the time of SARS-CoV-2 exposure influences whether someone becomes infected. . . .

Dr Rhia Kundu, first author of the study, from Imperial’s National Heart & Lung Institute, says: “Being exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus doesn’t always result in infection, and we’ve been keen to understand why. We found that high levels of pre-existing T cells, created by the body when infected with other human coronaviruses like the common cold, can protect against COVID-19 infection.<<<


There's been a widely repeated theory that 'prior exposure to other common-cold type coronaviruses may assist in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection'. I'm glad to see someone put in the effort to get real evidence to support or refute this idea. Those are nice results, and they're the result of quite a lot of difficult work.

Of possible great importance is the finding that the circulating memory T-cells they found, were directed against virus epitopes (protein features) other than the Spike protein. Will this lead to better vaccines? Stay tuned.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Well, there are T cells from prior infections with human coronaviruses that cause the common cold:

>>>T Cells From Common Colds Cross-Protect Against Infection With SARS-CoV-2

People with higher levels of T cells from common cold coronaviruses are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2.

A new study, published in Nature Communications and led by Imperial College London researchers, provides the first evidence of a protective role for these T cells. While previous studies have shown that T cells induced by other coronaviruses can recognise SARS-CoV-2, the new study examines for the first time how the presence of these T cells at the time of SARS-CoV-2 exposure influences whether someone becomes infected. . . .

Dr Rhia Kundu, first author of the study, from Imperial’s National Heart & Lung Institute, says: “Being exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus doesn’t always result in infection, and we’ve been keen to understand why. We found that high levels of pre-existing T cells, created by the body when infected with other human coronaviruses like the common cold, can protect against COVID-19 infection.<<<


There's been a widely repeated theory that 'prior exposure to other common-cold type coronaviruses may assist in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection'. I'm glad to see someone put in the effort to get real evidence to support or refute this idea. Those are nice results, and they're the result of quite a lot of difficult work.

Of possible great importance is the finding that the circulating memory T-cells they found, were directed against virus epitopes (protein features) other than the Spike protein. Will this lead to better vaccines? Stay tuned.
Well, I had a cold over the holidays and I get my booster shot today. After that, I'll be bulletproof! ;)
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
Well, I had a cold over the holidays and I get my booster shot today. After that, I'll be bulletproof! ;)
I'm assuming you know this, but there are only 4 known coronaviruses that cause the common cold, and (as far as I know) the vast majority of common colds are not caused by these 4 viruses. So, unfortunately, you are probably not bulletproof (welcome to the club).

I had a nasty virus of some sort a little over 2 years ago that lingered for weeks. In addition to the typical symptoms of a common cold, I also got pink eye and I completely lost my hearing in one ear (not at the same time; the virus took an extended siteseeing vacation in my body). I'm guessing it might have been an adenovirus, but I really don't know.

>>>Many different respiratory viruses can cause the common cold, but rhinoviruses are the most common. Rhinoviruses can also trigger asthma attacks and have been linked to sinus and ear infections. Other viruses that can cause colds include respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza viruses, adenovirus, common human coronaviruses, and human metapneumovirus.<<<

https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html

>>>Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with one or more of these viruses at some point in their lives.<<<

 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
I'm assuming you know this, but there are only 4 known coronaviruses that cause the common cold, and (as far as I know) the vast majority of common colds are not caused by these 4 viruses. So, unfortunately, you are probably not bulletproof (welcome to the club).

I had a nasty virus of some sort a little over 2 years ago that lingered for weeks. In addition to the typical symptoms of a common cold, I also got pink eye and I completely lost my hearing in one ear (not at the same time; the virus took an extended siteseeing vacation in my body). I'm guessing it might have been an adenovirus, but I really don't know.

>>>Many different respiratory viruses can cause the common cold, but rhinoviruses are the most common. Rhinoviruses can also trigger asthma attacks and have been linked to sinus and ear infections. Other viruses that can cause colds include respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza viruses, adenovirus, common human coronaviruses, and human metapneumovirus.<<<

https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html

>>>Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with one or more of these viruses at some point in their lives.<<<

You just made an ass(of)u(and)me. I did not know that. Thanks for nuthin'. :D
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
There's been a widely repeated theory that 'prior exposure to other common-cold type coronaviruses may assist in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection'. I'm glad to see someone put in the effort to get real evidence to support or refute this idea. Those are nice results, and they're the result of quite a lot of difficult work.

Of possible great importance is the finding that the circulating memory T-cells they found, were directed against virus epitopes (protein features) other than the Spike protein. Will this lead to better vaccines? Stay tuned.
When I first saw the new study I wondered if it might explain the results of the study in Singapore (post #4741) showing that an early surge of T cells was associated with mild COVID. However, I went back and re-read the paper and it looks like the authors already considered this possibility and concluded it is unlikely to be a factor in the ORF7/8- specific T-Cells they detected:

>>>Given that this viral variant was associated with a milder disease (Young et al., 2020), the early induction of ORF7/8 immunity is worthy of further investigation. It remains difficult to explain why ORF7/8-specific T cells were preferentially detected during the acute phase of infection. Findings show a corresponding increase in ORF8-specific antibodies during the early phases of SARS-CoV-2 infection (Hachim et al., 2020). However, there is no experimental evidence of preferential early expression of ORF7/8 proteins in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells that might contribute to increased immunogenicity of these accessory proteins in the early phases of SARS-CoV-2 infection. An alternative hypothesis is that pre-existing immunological memory to ORF7 or ORF8 might have caused selective accelerated expansion of ORF7/8 T cells, because ORF7/8-specific T cells can be detected occasionally in archived PBMC samples collected from healthy individuals before 2019 (Mateus et al., 2020). However, ORF7/8 is only expressed by SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 with little homology to other seasonal coronaviruses. Hence, the role of such peptide cross-reactive cells is puzzling and calls for a more detailed analysis of the effect of pre-existing immunity in the control or pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and of the role of T cells specific for different antigens in SARS-CoV-2 protection.<<<

 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
This study seems to show that omicron is less severe in almost every way. Hopefully this is correct.

>>>Patients at a large health system in Southern California who had the Covid omicron variant were much less likely to need hospitalization, intensive care or die than people infected with the delta strain, a study found this week.

Infectious disease experts found omicron patients at Kaiser Permanente Southern California were 74% less likely to end up in ICUs and 91% less likely to die than delta patients. None of the patients with omicron required mechanical ventilation, according to the study.

What’s more, the risk of hospitalization was 52% lower in omicron patients than delta sufferers, according to the study, which has not been peer reviewed. Researchers are publishing studies before they are reviewed by other experts due to the urgency of the pandemic.

Hospital stays for patients with omicron were also about three days shorter than their delta counterparts. Unvaccinated patients were also less likely to develop severe disease, according to the data.

“Reductions in disease severity associated with omicron variant infections were evident among both vaccinated and unvaccinated patients, and among those with or without documented prior SARS-CoV-2 infection,” the team of researchers found.<<<


 
cpp

cpp

Audioholic Samurai
I did finally get the Pfizer booster (along with the flu shot) this last weekend. Sore shoulder again from the poke but a lot of fatigue. I think the shot combined with the overnight shifts put me out for two days. Anyone else experience fatigue on a normal sleeping schedule?
Got my booster last Sept 9 and the flu shot 14 days later. Felt fine, actually played golf both days.
 
SithZedi

SithZedi

Audioholic
Coffee! Bloomberg did not let me post it correctly. Apologies to the staff.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
US deaths up a bit yesterday but nowhere near last winter's numbers. Maybe we are getting a little closer.
If you look at the Wisconsin cases vs deaths in the link, cases total 1.219M and deaths total 11,475 which is less than 1%, in total. A month ago, deaths were in the 1.05% area and if the pre-Omicron variants have become less common AND if they remain the minority of cases, my main question is "What's next?".

 
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highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I'm assuming you know this, but there are only 4 known coronaviruses that cause the common cold, and (as far as I know) the vast majority of common colds are not caused by these 4 viruses. So, unfortunately, you are probably not bulletproof (welcome to the club).

I had a nasty virus of some sort a little over 2 years ago that lingered for weeks. In addition to the typical symptoms of a common cold, I also got pink eye and I completely lost my hearing in one ear (not at the same time; the virus took an extended siteseeing vacation in my body). I'm guessing it might have been an adenovirus, but I really don't know.

>>>Many different respiratory viruses can cause the common cold, but rhinoviruses are the most common. Rhinoviruses can also trigger asthma attacks and have been linked to sinus and ear infections. Other viruses that can cause colds include respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza viruses, adenovirus, common human coronaviruses, and human metapneumovirus.<<<

https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html

>>>Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with one or more of these viruses at some point in their lives.<<<

How similar are those to SARS-Cov2 and would it be possible to be infected with one of them when a test for the latter is positive?
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Do you know it was a cold because you were tested?
Well, I had several negative rapid tests, a negative PCR test and I don't have any allergies. I had a sore throat and nasal congestion. I can only assume it was a cold.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
How similar are those to SARS-Cov2 and would it be possible to be infected with one of them when a test for the latter is positive?
@Swerd could probably provide a better answer, but my understanding is that an antibody test for past infection could be positive if a person had been infected in the past with any of the viruses, but the tests (PCR and rapid) used to detect an active infection would not result in a positive result if a person is infected with one of the common cold coronaviruses.

>>>We experienced a 72-year-old man who developed laboratory-confirmed human coronavirus HKU1 [common cold] pneumonia. PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 from a nasopharyngeal specimen was negative twice, and rapid immunochromatographic antibody test (RIAT) using a commercially available kit for IgM and IgG against SARS-CoV-2 showed him turning positive for IgG against SARS-CoV-2. We then performed RIAT in stored serum samples from other patients who suffered laboratory-confirmed human common cold coronaviruses (n = 6) and viruses other than coronavirus (influenza virus, n = 3; rhinovirus, n = 3; metapneumovirus, n = 1; adenovirus, n = 1) admitted until January 2019. Including the present case, four of 7 (57%) showed false-positive RIAT results due to human common cold coronaviruses infection. Two of the 4 patients showed initial negative to subsequent positive RIAT results, indicating seroconversion. RIAT was positive for IgG and IgM in viruses other than coronavirus in 2 (25.0%) and 1 (12.5%) patient. Because of high incidence of false positive RIAT results, cross antigenicity between human common cold coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2 can be considered. Results of RIAT should be interpreted in light of epidemics of human common cold coronaviruses infection. Prevalence of past SARS-CoV-2 infection may be overestimated due to high incidence of false-positive RIAT results.<<<

 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Well, I had several negative rapid tests, a negative PCR test and I don't have any allergies. I had a sore throat and nasal congestion. I can only assume it was a cold.
That's what I assumed and TLS wrote that I had COVID until I tested otherwise. He was right.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
That's what I assumed and TLS wrote that I had COVID until I tested otherwise. He was right.
That's the thing - I made no assumptions and got a PCR test after I developed symptoms. My daughter and her boyfriend both had colds just prior to me (both had negative rapid and PCR tests) and I was leaning towards that diagnosis for myself. But, not wanting to assume, I got the PCR test. I was isolating regardless.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
That's the thing - I made no assumptions and got a PCR test after I developed symptoms. My daughter and her boyfriend both had colds just prior to me (both had negative rapid and PCR tests) and I was leaning towards that diagnosis for myself. But, not wanting to assume, I got the PCR test. I was isolating regardless.
I was responding to your "I can only assume it was a cold" comment.

Were the stuffy head and sore throat the extent of your symptoms?
 
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