Can we have a rational discussion about guns and why the typical arguments for gun control and its implementation won't work?

highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
It's a term for both the number of female teachers outweighing males in the profession by a large margin as well as the pro girl / anti male agenda pushed on the boys. Easy to look it up. The teaching profession in my family is well represented going back many generations. My wife and one of my kids teach in elementary school. Personally, have taught both university undergrad and classes in the corporate world. Also mentored young post college grads coming into the workforce as well as young executives into their late 30s..

Thankfully, I don't have personal experience with "semenizing" priests but have heard plenty of stories from friends. And Rome wonders why the church has no credibility...
How can you use 'outweighing'??????????????? That's very hurtful- you should use 'gravitationally gifted'. :)
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
It's difficult for me to picture what it's like for boys in school now, being taught predominantly by women. I didn't have any female teachers after Grade 3. Not one. And, my teachers were all typical men from where I grew up - they generally hunted, fished and built their own houses. The profession certainly wasn't viewed as being "for women".
You're in Canada- completely different from the US WRT teachers and how teaching is done. Maybe not as much difference now, but in the past, teachers who were women didn't coddle the kids. Most of the male teachers in middle & high school were manly men, ex-military and the curricula they taught was varied. We had a few weenies, but most weren't going to allow us to act like pussies. That may have been due to growing up in a suburb, but I don't remember many hard-core conservatives pushing their agenda partially because they hadn't gone so far off the rails. We did have a few teachers who were wildly Liberal and for our entertainment, one history teacher and a Conservative student who is now a contributor for MSNBC (having switched from Conservative talk radio) would get into it on a regular basis, shouting at each other with little changing between them. We had good science & Math teachers who happened to be women, too- this was at a time when girls really weren't encouraged to go into these areas although several of the female students from high school did go into fields like Architecture, Medicine, Science and engineering.
 
SithZedi

SithZedi

Audioholic General
Classrooms have certainly changed in the last 20 years. Current politics was never a topic in class even in high school. That usually happened in college. Campaign stickers and posters were never allowed in classrooms prior to 2004 in our local school system. Teachers would never share their personal lives or views in class. You would not even know if they were married with children in many cases.
In the 70s, we had a gun club in high school and kids would bring loaded guns in the trunks of their cars to school. The student population was very diversified demographically and there were few incidents of violence outside of gangs. Smart phones were confiscated before school as late as 2016. Now all the kids have them in elementary school and the teachers can only do so much.
It's difficult to focus on learning in that environment.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Warlord
IMHO, think it's an important issue most especially for boys who might not have a father figure at home. The system has to find away to recruit more talent in whether financially or remove some of cultural barriers. Have suggested over the years to our school board to recruit from the recently retired pool of men with private sector experience but it is ignored.

I'd agree with that. If a child doesn't have a father figure in their life then a male teacher really can make a HUGE difference. I've seen the anger that adults can hold onto when they grow up without a father. Even if they have a few really good dudes in their life. Sometimes it just doesn't' matter.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
You're in Canada- completely different from the US WRT teachers and how teaching is done. Maybe not as much difference now, but in the past, teachers who were women didn't coddle the kids. Most of the male teachers in middle & high school were manly men, ex-military and the curricula they taught was varied. We had a few weenies, but most weren't going to allow us to act like pussies. That may have been due to growing up in a suburb, but I don't remember many hard-core conservatives pushing their agenda partially because they hadn't gone so far off the rails. We did have a few teachers who were wildly Liberal and for our entertainment, one history teacher and a Conservative student who is now a contributor for MSNBC (having switched from Conservative talk radio) would get into it on a regular basis, shouting at each other with little changing between them. We had good science & Math teachers who happened to be women, too- this was at a time when girls really weren't encouraged to go into these areas although several of the female students from high school did go into fields like Architecture, Medicine, Science and engineering.
How much different do you think it was/is? I have no idea, so I'm interested in knowing how you know.

I graduated in 1981. I don't know if the teaching staff ratio vis a vis men/women was typical, or just an anomaly. I expect that the concentration of women in the teaching profession is much higher now.

I don't remember any heated political discussions. People didn't wear their political opinions on their sleeves - even during social studies classes. I couldn't even guess how any of my teachers would have voted. One of my criticisms of the US electoral system is having voters register as party supporters/independents. As far as I'm concerned, only dues-paying, card-carrying party members should be involved in picking election candidates. Because, right now, it seems that Americans view each other as Republicans or Democrats first and as individuals a far distant second.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Classrooms have certainly changed in the last 20 years. Current politics was never a topic in class even in high school. That usually happened in college. Campaign stickers and posters were never allowed in classrooms prior to 2004 in our local school system. Teachers would never share their personal lives or views in class. You would not even know if they were married with children in many cases.
In the 70s, we had a gun club in high school and kids would bring loaded guns in the trunks of their cars to school. The student population was very diversified demographically and there were few incidents of violence outside of gangs. Smart phones were confiscated before school as late as 2016. Now all the kids have them in elementary school and the teachers can only do so much.
It's difficult to focus on learning in that environment.
I don't know if you're replying to me, but 20 years ago, I was done with high school for 27 years. However, being a suburban school, guns weren't part of it. We didn't have the same gangs, we had Greasers and there was no such thing as a smart phone, personal computer or digital stuff.
 
SithZedi

SithZedi

Audioholic General
I don't know if you're replying to me, but 20 years ago, I was done with high school for 27 years. However, being a suburban school, guns weren't part of it. We didn't have the same gangs, we had Greasers and there was no such thing as a smart phone, personal computer or digital stuff.
Was just giving some personal perspective on then and now. We had Greasers too. I guess it was part of that 1950s nostalgia in the 1970s that came out of movies like "American Graffiti, Happy Days, and Grease.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Classrooms have certainly changed in the last 20 years. Current politics was never a topic in class even in high school. That usually happened in college. Campaign stickers and posters were never allowed in classrooms prior to 2004 in our local school system. Teachers would never share their personal lives or views in class. You would not even know if they were married with children in many cases.
In the 70s, we had a gun club in high school and kids would bring loaded guns in the trunks of their cars to school. The student population was very diversified demographically and there were few incidents of violence outside of gangs. Smart phones were confiscated before school as late as 2016. Now all the kids have them in elementary school and the teachers can only do so much.
It's difficult to focus on learning in that environment.
We had political conversations even back in grade school in the 60s....highly partisan depending on the elders as most of kids were clueless/could care less at the time. In high school (early 70s) we were fairly political, at university more so. Don't remember anyone with guns, do remember knives and other weapons, tho. Mostly a parent problem as far as how kids act in school, tho.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
One of my criticisms of the US electoral system is having voters register as party supporters/independents. As far as I'm concerned, only dues-paying, card-carrying party members should be involved in picking election candidates. Because, right now, it seems that Americans view each other as Republicans or Democrats first and as individuals a far distant second.
It’s my understanding that US parties are more akin to election campaign machines than parties as such like in Europe or perhaps Canada.

Some US states have ranked choice in their primaries and/or elections, and that should reduce the electability of extreme candidates that caters to their own base. Perhaps they’ll get more moderate representatives elected.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Was just giving some personal perspective on then and now. We had Greasers too. I guess it was part of that 1950s nostalgia in the 1970s that came out of movies like "American Graffiti, Happy Days, and Grease.
Early-'70s greasers were just the last ones- this was up to '75 (when I graduated) and they were greasers when we started in '71.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Seems SCOTUS is going the other way (i.e. away from gun control)
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
Seems SCOTUS is going the other way (i.e. away from gun control)
I read about this decision just now and apparently regular mass murder of children is an acceptable price to pay for the right to be armed in public.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Ninja
I read about this decision just now and apparently regular mass murder of children is an acceptable price to pay for the right to be armed in public.
There are now more guns in America than people. Yay.:confused:
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Ninja
Well it's something....

 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
And there is this of an unarmed Black man fleeing the police and with some 60 gun shot wounds. Assuming an exit wound for each bullet he was shot about 30 times.

WTF is wrong with the US police as things like this happens on a regular basis where an enormous amount of rounds are fired?

Obviously a Black man has good reasons to fear for his life if he is stopped in traffic by the police, be it for cause or not.

 
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highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
And there is this of an unarmed Black man fleeing the police and with some 60 gun shot wounds. Assuming an exit wound for each bullet he was shot about 30 times.

WTF is wrong with the US police as things like this happens on a regular basis where an enormous amount of rounds are fired?

Obviously a Black man has good reasons to fear for his life if he is stopped in traffic by the police, be it for cause or not.

It seems like a frequent occurrence but if you consider the number of interactions between the police and civilians, it's a low %. OTOH, once is too often.

The comment I have heard and seen most is "We were trained to stop the threat". I have yet to see a reporter comment on that- if they aren't moving and have stopped bleeding, the threat has been stopped. If the cops are using an entire magazine, it may be the extreme stress of the situation, but that implies most officers react the same way and it's not true- many officers are far more composed. The ones in Akron seem to have completely lost control.

I have major problems with the way a lot of people are shot by the police and it's time that we send the message that they need to stop firing when the person is running away UNLESS they're shooting at someone at the same time. In most states, we're told that someone whose home is being invaded should try to escape or hide, not just start blasting. Outside, a gun is required to remain in the holster or pocket unless it's going to be used- it's not legal to use it as a threat by holding it up or aiming at someone and this can be called 'brandishing', possibly resulting in being charged with aggravated assault. YouTube has plenty of videos of cops shooting at someone who they may not be able to see (the incident in Orlando is one of these and the officer fired at the guy with an Olive Garden restaurant directly behind the suspect). They clearly don't hit the target most of the time and in Akron, I would be surprised if the shell casings found total less than 100 whether they're all reported, or not.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
It seems like a frequent occurrence but if you consider the number of interactions between the police and civilians, it's a low %. OTOH, once is too often.

The comment I have heard and seen most is "We were trained to stop the threat". I have yet to see a reporter comment on that- if they aren't moving and have stopped bleeding, the threat has been stopped. If the cops are using an entire magazine, it may be the extreme stress of the situation, but that implies most officers react the same way and it's not true- many officers are far more composed. The ones in Akron seem to have completely lost control.

I have major problems with the way a lot of people are shot by the police and it's time that we send the message that they need to stop firing when the person is running away UNLESS they're shooting at someone at the same time. In most states, we're told that someone whose home is being invaded should try to escape or hide, not just start blasting. Outside, a gun is required to remain in the holster or pocket unless it's going to be used- it's not legal to use it as a threat by holding it up or aiming at someone and this can be called 'brandishing', possibly resulting in being charged with aggravated assault. YouTube has plenty of videos of cops shooting at someone who they may not be able to see (the incident in Orlando is one of these and the officer fired at the guy with an Olive Garden restaurant directly behind the suspect). They clearly don't hit the target most of the time and in Akron, I would be surprised if the shell casings found total less than 100 whether they're all reported, or not.
EU has a much larger population than USA but we don’t have this excessive firing of rounds by the police as a regular occurring event.
 
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