Adam Kinzinger (R-IL)

Trell

Trell

Audioholic Field Marshall
What an awful family he has, on top of that.


"As the result of being one of 10 Republican members to vote to impeach Trump last month, 11 members of Kinzinger's family sent a letter to him accusing him of being a part of the "devil's army." The New York Times first reported on the letter last week. "
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
What an awful family he has, on top of that.


"As the result of being one of 10 Republican members to vote to impeach Trump last month, 11 members of Kinzinger's family sent a letter to him accusing him of being a part of the "devil's army." The New York Times first reported on the letter last week. "
He also stated he doesn't really believe the Democrats want the Republicans to be the party of fear-mongering.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
Kinzinger: country > party > career
the other 80%: career > party > country

It's an old story.....
 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
What an awful family he has, on top of that.


"As the result of being one of 10 Republican members to vote to impeach Trump last month, 11 members of Kinzinger's family sent a letter to him accusing him of being a part of the "devil's army." The New York Times first reported on the letter last week. "
From that NYT link.....

“Oh my, what a disappointment you are to us and to God!” they wrote. “You have embarrassed the Kinzinger family name!”

The author of the letter was Karen Otto, Mr. Kinzinger’s cousin, who paid $7 to send it by certified mail to Mr. Kinzinger’s father — to make sure the congressman would see it, which he did. She also sent copies to Republicans across Illinois, including other members of the state’s congressional delegation.
 
L

lp85253

Senior Audioholic
He's one of the few who voted to impeach, received threats, etc, but Trumpism isn't just gonna go away he realized. One of the few Republicans I respect. His line about 'If I risked my life in war I have to be willing to rish my career' is a great one.

https://news.yahoo.com/adam-kinzinger-says-the-battle-with-trumpism-has-to-be-fought-in-public-230611313.html
He's got more integrity than the rest of the gop combined... I wish both he and AOC Long stays in Congress...
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
The devil's army isn't the drumph supporters? What, how does that work? :)
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Chief
It's amazing that supporting Trump at all costs has become a litmus test for so many Republican voters. It has nothing to do with principles, just blind Trump worship.

 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
It's amazing that supporting Trump at all costs has become a litmus test for so many Republican voters. It has nothing to do with principles, just blind Trump worship.

I think it's because he has a 30% base and they don't want to lose that. As Kinzinger said, they really deep down want him out but publicly won't say it. Having said that, someone has to get the ball rolling because it's still his party. He's just running it from Mar-a-Lago.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Field Marshall
I think it's because he has a 30% base and they don't want to lose that. As Kinzinger said, they really deep down want him out but publicly won't say it. Having said that, someone has to get the ball rolling because it's still his party. He's just running it from Mar-a-Lago.
The GOP knows this as well:


And McConnell shows that he will grab power at any cost, including endorsing a fascist:

 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Chief
I think it's because he has a 30% base and they don't want to lose that. As Kinzinger said, they really deep down want him out but publicly won't say it. Having said that, someone has to get the ball rolling because it's still his party. He's just running it from Mar-a-Lago.
I'd agree, I think that's the basic problem for Republicans in office right now. As I mentioned in another thread, Trump has enough power due to his hyper-loyal nut base to to prevent a Republican candidate from winning, but he doesn't have enough support outside his nut base to help a Republican candidate win. A Republican candidate that tries to distance himself/herself from Trump in an effort to capture swing votes will be subject to an attack from Trump and a loss of his nuts, but the candidate will not be able to get enough swing votes to make up for the loss of Trump's nuts. On the other hand, a Republican candidate that is loyal to Trump's nuts will turn off the swing voters and lose. Trump and his nuts are lose-lose proposition. So, where am I going with this? Someone needs to cut off Trump's nuts (sorry, that was a long ways to go for not much humor).

While I don't disagree with you, my post was actually directed more at Trump's nuts, not the Republicans in office. I do not understand the blind Trump worship by his nuts (AKA hyper-loyal Trump voters). Trump's nuts do not appear to have any principles, just blind faith in the person.

This type of blind loyalty to a person rather than principles annoys the sh*t out of me. Not to get too far off track, but the big problem Hamilton had with Burr was not that he disagreed with Burr's principles, it was Burr's lack of principles. Burr was just an opportunist with no principles.

Sound familiar?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Blind faith is a huge problem. Good band, but a terrible way to follow politicians.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Field Marshall
Blind faith is a huge problem. Good band, but a terrible way to follow politicians.
Faith is spot on as the Trump followers are deeply "Christian". Myself, I'm an atheist but grew up in a very religious part of Norway, so the Trump "Christians" fills me with contempt.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Chief
Faith is spot on as the Trump followers are deeply "Christian". Myself, I'm an atheist but grew up in a very religious part of Norway, so the Trump "Christians" fills me with contempt.
I used the term "Trump worship" in an informal sense, but there's no doubt it is a cult of sorts. The Trump worshipers seem to be unaware of the fact that they are in a cult. I'm not sure they are deeply Christian, but they are deeply devoted to Trump.

It's strange that Trump himself seems to believe his own imaginary version of reality, at least to some extent.

>>>I want to point out this chanting in his head of “I won, I won”—this is, I believe, from his childhood, where he was trained to not allow negative thoughts and to keep focusing on the magical thought, which is that he won.<<<

Having said that, Trump must understand at some level that he's lying his *ss off to get what he wants.

 
D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
I'd agree, I think that's the basic problem for Republicans in office right now. As I mentioned in another thread, Trump has enough power due to his hyper-loyal nut base to to prevent a Republican candidate from winning, but he doesn't have enough support outside his nut base to help a Republican candidate win. A Republican candidate that tries to distance himself/herself from Trump in an effort to capture swing votes will be subject to an attack from Trump and a loss of his nuts, but the candidate will not be able to get enough swing votes to make up for the loss of Trump's nuts. On the other hand, a Republican candidate that is loyal to Trump's nuts will turn off the swing voters and lose. Trump and his nuts are lose-lose proposition. So, where am I going with this? Someone needs to cut off Trump's nuts (sorry, that was a long ways to go for not much humor).

While I don't disagree with you, my post was actually directed more at Trump's nuts, not the Republicans in office. I do not understand the blind Trump worship by his nuts (AKA hyper-loyal Trump voters). Trump's nuts do not appear to have any principles, just blind faith in the person.

This type of blind loyalty to a person rather than principles annoys the sh*t out of me. Not to get too far off track, but the big problem Hamilton had with Burr was not that he disagreed with Burr's principles, it was Burr's lack of principles. Burr was just an opportunist with no principles.

Sound familiar?
No not really. I've never seen it turn into a cult. I'd say "I love the uneducated too" was a strong signal, and he did tap into the "forgotten" people, albeit quite a few shady ones. Most other politicians either didn't tap into that or wouldn't cause yanno they needed to educate and improve themselves. I think they placed him on a pedestal because he was "unconventional", but alas it was really about owning the libs and flipping the bird to em. Add to that how much the right media lie and stir anger and hate. I'm sure there's many more ingredients to like policy at the time, but I've never seen it get this sad. For me it wasn't about policy but the kind of person Trump is. So your last sentence is spot-on.

Edit: obviously not all are but he did give those on the fringe a voice. As you said, he knows he's manipulating them.
 
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M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Chief
No not really. I've never seen it turn into a cult. I'd say "I love the uneducated too" was a strong signal, and he did tap into the "forgotten" people, albeit quite a few shady ones. Most other politicians either didn't tap into that or wouldn't cause yanno they needed to educate and improve themselves. I think they placed him on a pedestal because he was "unconventional", but alas it was really about owning the libs and flipping the bird to em. Add to that how much the right media lie and stir anger and hate. I'm sure there's many more ingredients to like policy at the time, but I've never seen it get this sad. For me it wasn't about policy but the kind of person Trump is. So your last sentence is spot-on.

Edit: obviously not all are but he did give those on the fringe a voice. As you said, he knows he's manipulating them.
I'm not sure I follow.

When you say "No not really" are you saying you disagree with my assesment that Trump can sink a Republican candidate but he can't really help a candidate very much?

Or do you mean you disagree with my statement "Trump's nuts do not appear to have any principles, just blind faith in the person"?

Or do you disagree with my statement "Burr was just an opportunist with no principles"?

Or are you responding to "Sound familiar?" in the sense that it does not sound familiar?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Faith is spot on as the Trump followers are deeply "Christian". Myself, I'm an atheist but grew up in a very religious part of Norway, so the Trump "Christians" fills me with contempt.
I was referring to faith in the person and being completely blind to their faults.

This is a cult of personality and the followers can be just as rabid as if it were a religion. I see comments on a regular basis from people who believe T was the best POTUS in history and I don't bother to argue because it's like talking to a wall.

I don't personally know if they're deeply anything WRT religion because I don't mingle with them- what people say and what they do can be very different from what they are. I have seen a lot of people talk about going to church, reading the bible and their family members say they were turning their lives around as the Police are leading them away in handcuffs after they killed someone.

I'm not a religious person, but I remember when people were afraid to do bad things and at that time, we were able to leave the house without worrying about someone stealing from us or walk the streets without being robbed, shot or hit by a stolen car when it's being chased. People no longer fear the consequences of their actions.
 
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D

Dude#1279435

Senior Audioholic
I'm not sure I follow.

When you say "No not really" are you saying you disagree with my assesment that Trump can sink a Republican candidate but he can't really help a candidate very much?

Or do you mean you disagree with my statement "Trump's nuts do not appear to have any principles, just blind faith in the person"?

Or do you disagree with my statement "Burr was just an opportunist with no principles"?

Or are you responding to "Sound familiar?" in the sense that it does not sound familiar?
My bad. I agree with everything you say, but what doesn't sound familiar is the cult and the degree of hate and anger.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Chief
My bad. I agree with everything you say, but what doesn't sound familiar is the cult and the degree of hate and anger.
Perhaps we construe the meaning of the term "cult" differently. The Vanity Fair article was transparent about the fact that they were using the term as referring to authoritarian control.

The interactions I've had with die hard Trump fans suggests that they simply defend Trump and attack others, regardless of the issue or facts. An example is Trump's comparison of COVID to the flu. No matter how many people die from COVID, Trump supporters dig in and say things like "people aren't really dying from COVID, the hospitals are just saying this so they can get more money." Another example is the "stolen election" narrative. The facts do not support this, but it doesn't matter to the Trump supporters; they choose to believe fairy tales. If Trump says it was "stolen," that is what they believe.

The stout beliefs in fairy tales told by a single source strike me as being very cult-like.

Do you agree with the following statement by Frank Luntz?

“He’s become the voice of God for tens of millions of people, and they will follow him to the ends of the earth and off the cliff.”


It's ironic on several levels is that Clinton wanted Trump to win the nomination because he was viewed as being a Pied Piper candidate that would lead the party to ruin. Given that Trump is the first president in almost 100 years to lose the House, the Senate, and the presidency all in one term, he did ultimately prove to be a Pied Piper, albeit too late for Clinton.

>>>So to take Bush down, Clinton’s team drew up a plan to pump Trump up. . . . “The variety of candidates is a positive here, and many of the lesser known can serve as a cudgel to move the more established candidates further to the right. In this scenario, we don’t want to marginalize the more extreme candidates, but make them more ‘Pied Piper’ candidates who actually represent the mainstream of the Republican Party,” read the memo.

“Pied Piper candidates include, but aren’t limited to:
• Ted Cruz
• Donald Trump
• Ben Carson
We need to be elevating the Pied Piper candidates so that they are leaders of the pack and tell the press to [take] them seriously."

While the campaign also kept a close eye on Rubio, monitoring his announcement speech and tightly designing the tweeted responses to his moves, Clinton’s team in Brooklyn was delightedly puzzled by Trump’s shift into the pole position that July after attacking John McCain by declaring, “I like people who weren’t captured.” . . . Clinton strategists' initial reaction to Trump’s blaze through the primaries at the time was giddy disbelief, but back in New York the anti-Trump plan and machinery was still barely begun. . . . “With [Trump’s] potential appeal as an instrument of revenge among white voters, it was clear early on that he would scramble the map." <<<

 

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