What is "pure direct"?

RichB

RichB

Audioholic Field Marshall
Pure Direct is whatever the manufacturer implements.
This is documented and passed to marketing for messaging.
It is then translated into English :D

- Rich
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
So don't hypothesize and speculate. Open up your AVR and search for something that looks like 7 passive crossovers.
Nope. No urges here.

I'll let you have the honor of doing that.
 
Steve81

Steve81

Audioholics Five-0
If the artist and/or producer and/or recording engineer wanted extra bass, treble or whatever, they have far better tools to add it than my rig.
Not entirely true. They control what they hear at the studio, but given the differences in equipment and environment, what any given person hears at home is liable to be quite different.
 
Steve81

Steve81

Audioholics Five-0
Nope. No urges here.

I'll let you have the honor of doing that.
OK, you pay shipping to send me your Denon, and I'll tear it down for you :D

I already know the answer for my UMC-200 given that Emotiva posts shots of the innards of their gear for public consumption. Granted, I'm not an EE, but I don't see any passive circuits that would give me this flexibility in the analog domain:

image.jpg

Not only are you are able to independently adjust crossover frequency for each speaker group (ie. fronts, center, surrounds) but you’re also able to select the slope (12 dB/octave or 24 dB/octave). The crossovers are adjustable in 5Hz step sizes from 40Hz to 80Hz, 10Hz step sizes from 80Hz to 150Hz and 25Hz step sizes from 150Hz to 250Hz.
 
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Steve81

Steve81

Audioholics Five-0
PS: If you're opting out of mailing it as well, maybe look through the vents to check for something that looks like this. That's the Outlaw ICBM; for a sense of scale, the unit is 17.6" wide by 7" deep.
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Pure direct on my Yamaha turns off all processing, and all unnecessary circuits to supposedly create a very clean unpolluted signal straight through to the speakers. There is no subwoofer output. So if your speakers have decent bass response and you don't want sub output you can try the pure direct mode. Maybe the recording you're listening to is a little bass heavy, pure direct might clean it up a bit. Just experiment with it to see how it sounds to you.

Straight- sends signals straight to the appropriate channel without any additional processing. There is sub output with Straight, and bass management is in effect.
Straight also includes the YPAO settings... :)
 
S

sterling shoote

Audioholic General
So, it appears, Pure Direct is the term coined by Yamaha for a function on some of their electronics. Do any other brands use this term? Is the term generic for the function as Yamaha describes it; and, who really cares. I think the OP should have just been directed to read his operators manual.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
Yes, my Onkyo, Denon avrs have a pure direct mode (also just a direct mode) and so did my deceased Pioneer. What's unique to Yamaha as far as I know is the use of "straight".
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
PS: If you're opting out of mailing it as well, maybe look through the vents to check for something that looks like this. That's the Outlaw ICBM; for a sense of scale, the unit is 17.6" wide by 7" deep.
Way too much work. :D

And no, I am definitely not sending you my AVP-A1HDCI. :)

Well, if they don't use cheap analog subwoofer crossover in the AVR, then it makes perfect sense that all analog inputs that has subwoofer output would require Analog to Digital conversion (ADC).

But if we use only digital inputs (HDMI), then ADC is not required even when subwoofer output is used.
 
Steve81

Steve81

Audioholics Five-0
But if we use only digital inputs (HDMI), then ADC is not required even when subwoofer output is used.
Indeed, though there is one exception: DSD. That has to be converted to PCM in order to employ bass management.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
Indeed, though there is one exception: DSD. That has to be converted to PCM in order to employ bass management.
It's been a while (sold my entire SACD collection on forum), but I do recall not being able to get DSD Direct when the subwoofer is used.

Kind of a drag. I would think that if the signal is already digital, it could just go to the digital subwoofer crossover. But I never could output subwoofer with DSD Direct.

No wonder I got rid of my SACD collection. :)
 
J

Jaybeez

Junior Audioholic
Not entirely true. They control what they hear at the studio, but given the differences in equipment and environment, what any given person hears at home is liable to be quite different.
Every engineer I know (including my own hobbyist self) always listens to their mixes on a number of different set ups. Most recordings I've done get burned to a CD, played on my stereo, in my car, .mp3 on my iPod, etc. Same for stuff I know others I know have done that many of us on this forum have heard commercially.

You simply have to hear the mix in "real life" before finalizing it.

So, what I buy I assume is what was intended.
 
Steve81

Steve81

Audioholics Five-0
So, what I buy I assume is what was intended.
I'll borrow a few words from Dr. Floyd Toole on the subject:
http://forums.audioholics.com/forums/threads/can-objective-loudspeaker-measurements-predict-subjective-preferences.94960/page-3#post-1108158
The missing component in audio right now is consistency in the timbral quality of recordings. Recording facilities are not standardized, and not necessarily very good. So, the most "perfect" loudspeaker in the world cannot always sound good. In fact, we still need tone controls, especially a bass control, to compensate for easily audible spectral balance variations in recordings. Yet, many audiophiles seem to go through life thinking that recordings are flawless and that all problems are at the playback end. Wrong!
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Not to mention the effect of the room. Cannot imagine listening to music without dsp myself due to all the parameters involved.
I listen to music in Pure Direct running my towers full range. I want to hear the speakers for themselves without room correction employed and I do like their sound very much
 
J

Jaybeez

Junior Audioholic
I listen to music in Pure Direct running my towers full range. I want to hear the speakers for themselves without room correction employed and I do like their sound very much
I feel the same way. I used to hype bass and treble (sound engineers call it "the smile") but now go for as neutral as possible.

My only room correction is acoustic panels.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
I listen to music in Pure Direct running my towers full range. I want to hear the speakers for themselves without room correction employed and I do like their sound very much
I wouldn't be happy with the low end of your towers...let alone the lack of placement for best bass. Its overrated IME to "hear the speakers for themselves". Do you have a properly treated listening room? That is something I haven't built yet, mine is more living space dependent with the compromises that involves.
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
I wouldn't be happy with the low end of your towers...let alone the lack of placement for best bass. Its overrated IME to "hear the speakers for themselves". Do you have a properly treated listening room? That is something I haven't built yet, mine is more living space dependent with the compromises that involves.
One thing you will learn about me very quickly is that I walk to a different beat. I could give a rat's ass what the consensus is out there. When I auditioned my current speakers, they were setup with an integrated amp without room correction because I wanted to know what they sounded like. That is how and why I purchased them. The bass response of my towers is very good for the music I listen too with the exception of pipe organ music. For that genre, I will deploy the sub but still turn off room correction.
 
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RichB

RichB

Audioholic Field Marshall
One thing you will learn about me very quickly is that I walk to a different beat. I could give a rat's ass what the consensus is out there. When I auditioned my current speakers, they were setup with an integrated amp without room correction so I knew what they would sound like without room correction. The bass response of my towers is very good for the music I listen too with the exception of pipe organ music. For that genre, I will deploy the sub but still turn off room correction.
Amen brother :p

The XMC-1 calls this "Reference Stereo" and therein lies its value.

Folks can RC and/or treat and validate with the graphs from the RC software, easurement software (REW), and may even use their ears. But in the end, the result should sound better than a "reference" with minimal processing applied.

- Rich
 

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