SVS SB-1000 or Rythmik L12

lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Well I just pulled the trigger on the SB-1000 worst case I can send it back since SVS has that great bill of rights. Anyone use or recommend the isolation feet? The condo is a newer building with tile floors...thoughts?
Don't expect them to do a lot. I'd experiment with some homemade isolation (blankets, packing foam, towels, etc.) first and see if it alleviates anything for your neighbor....
 
D

Doubleroll

Enthusiast
Great info everyone! Lucky for me I didn’t order the feet yet ;-)
 
afterlife2

afterlife2

Audioholic Spartan
haha I just used those thick carpet mat from dollar tree and it wells very well. Great option though
ryan.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
I use them in a two part system that works great in my situation. For the feet by themselves, they will help stop the physical transfer of energy from the sub to the structure. They will not stop the sound energy. If you want to try something much less expensive:
I have seen those type of things recommended for isolation of speakers and subs, but the thing is those are intended to damp much heavier and much higher vibration equipment than any speaker or subwoofer. Those might be better than nothing, but they might be too stiff to be optimal for audio equipment. I don't think mechanical isolation is going to do any good with audio equipment anyway, except in a few special circumstances.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Ninja
I have seen those type of things recommended for isolation of speakers and subs, but the thing is those are intended to damp much heavier and much higher vibration equipment than any speaker or subwoofer. Those might be better than nothing, but they might be too stiff to be optimal for audio equipment. I don't think mechanical isolation is going to do any good with audio equipment anyway, except in a few special circumstances.
I haven't tried them for that but have seen the recommendations many times while I was deciding on my strategy for dealing with my spongy suspended floor.
I totally dig your instinct, though!

I do like my experience with the Soundpath feet from SVS. Just can't abide recommending them for the cost. I found mine, third party from a "fire" sale and rolled the dice. Glad I did.

Strangely, and separate from this, I did order a set of those diversitechs to put under our washing machine which will vibrate half the house on its spin cycle. It really interrupts my own vibrating of the house with two X-13s! :p
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
I use them in a two part system that works great in my situation. For the feet by themselves, they will help stop the physical transfer of energy from the sub to the structure. They will not stop the sound energy. If you want to try something much less expensive:
Those pads are fairly dense and while I think they might help a little, they are really designed for something heavy like an HVAC unit or a heavy air compressor. However, if you got a sheet of neoprene (like a mouse pad) and cut it to the 2 X 2 dimension and placed under each of these pads it would do a pretty good job of isolating the sub!
Understand that the neoprene needs to go under the Anti-Vibration pad so the weight of the sub is spread across the full 4 sq. inches of the pad (times 4 for one under each foot). If you put it on top of the A-V pad there is a good chance that the feet of the sub do not have as much surface area and will compress the neoprene so it will not be "squishy" enough to absorb the vibrations.
 
KEW

KEW

Audioholic Overlord
I have seen those type of things recommended for isolation of speakers and subs, but the thing is those are intended to damp much heavier and much higher vibration equipment than any speaker or subwoofer. Those might be better than nothing, but they might be too stiff to be optimal for audio equipment. I don't think mechanical isolation is going to do any good with audio equipment anyway, except in a few special circumstances.
I had not read your thread before I posted!

I haven't tried them for that but have seen the recommendations many times while I was deciding on my strategy for dealing with my spongy suspended floor.
I use these under my AVR/amps not to reduce vibration, but to improve clearance under the unit to allow easier airflow into the vents typically in the bottom of the unit. They always tell you to allow at least 6 inches (or whatever) clearance above the unit to allow good ventilation, but you are relying on the thermal effect of hot air rising, and feeding air into the amp from below is almost as important as giving it an easy exit above! The faster the air flows through (less restrictions) the better! In any case, I find these to be inexpensive and look decent.
 
T

TankTop5

Senior Audioholic
Those pads are fairly dense and while I think they might help a little, they are really designed for something heavy like an HVAC unit or a heavy air compressor. However, if you got a sheet of neoprene (like a mouse pad) and cut it to the 2 X 2 dimension and placed under each of these pads it would do a pretty good job of isolating the sub!
Understand that the neoprene needs to go under the Anti-Vibration pad so the weight of the sub is spread across the full 4 sq. inches of the pad (times 4 for one under each foot). If you put it on top of the A-V pad there is a good chance that the feet of the sub do not have as much surface area and will compress the neoprene so it will not be "squishy" enough to absorb the vibrations.
Bulk neoprene 1/2” rolls, a decent laser cutter and start making “custom” speaker and subwoofer isolation pads for $20-$30 a pair.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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wje2

Audioholic Intern
Great info everyone! Lucky for me I didn’t order the feet yet ;-)
I'd recommend the SVS isolation feet. While they're $49 for 4, you can easily use them on any future subwoofer that you own - whether it's an SVS sub, or not. You might just have to purchase new bolts for the size of hole that the other brand of subwoofer has. When I sold my pair of SB2000 SVS subs, I moved to 2 10" Monolith subs and was able to utilize my SVS isolation feet by heading to Lowe's in spending about $2.00 on bolts of the right size.

Prior to the SB2000 subs, I did buy a pair of SB1000 subs that I kept for a few weeks. The local retailer allowed me to exchange them for the SB2000 subs, along with the cost difference. It was a good move at the time.
 

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