G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'>is the velodyne cht-10 a good bargain at about $200</font>
 
Clint DeBoer

Clint DeBoer

Banned
<font color='#008080'>That's about fair. It's a good sub, though not very tight - once you compare it to more expensive models. If you want somehting to fill in the low end, the CHT-10 (which I have personally heard at length) will do fine.

Bottom line: for $200 it is a great choice.</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'>is it a good idea to get it or sould i get something nicer?</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'>i have like 40 min on that one... (its 2:30 eastern) what do u recomend for a 'tighter' sound and what exacty does that mean? more punch or somethin?</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'>is the VELODYNE CT-120 a better sub?
can get it for the same price</font>
 
B

BTech

Audiophyte
<font color='#000000'>Hi all, Quick and easy question ... If your not running speakers through your sub, then what exactly does the crossover do ?</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"> If your subs have built in crossovers as I suspect most of them do, then all you have to do is connect your receiver's amp section to the sub and then take the connection from the sub to your main speakers.
</td></tr></table>

This could be a recipe for disaster, especially if the sub is rated at 4 Ohms.  You can easily overdrive a receiver's amplifier into clipping and/or protective shutoff.

In the case of unpowered sub(s) I would recommend a separate power amplifier for the sub(s) instead of the receiver's amps, or as you indicated get powered sub(s).
__

BTech,
The sub's crossover is there as an alternative to using the internal crossover in the HT processor.  Many subs have a switch that turns off their internal crossover completely.  If they don't then you simply turn the sub's crossover up to it's highest setting when using the crossover in the HT processor.

For example, to use the sub's internal crossover you could feed the L&amp;R  LINE-OUT from the HT processor to the sub first, and then use the L&amp;R  LINE-OUT from the sub to the L&amp;R  LINE-IN  of the amplifiers for the main speakers.  This could also work with receivers if they have L&amp;R PRE-OUTs and L&amp;R AMP-INS.

This means in the HT processor you must set sub=no, mains=large and set the sub's crossover frequency between sub and mains to blend them where they sound the best.  

A good crossover starting point is to set the sub's crossover an octave above the mains -3dB low frequency spec, but this does depend on what type of crossovers the sub uses.

An example of the octave above the mains -3dB;
mains -3dB = 30Hz
sub xover set to 60Hz</font>
 

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