D

Dragon Warrior

Enthusiast
<font color='#000000'>I want to understand the advantages of buying a separate multi-channel amplifier to connect to my Denon 2802. I guess the disadvantage is $$$$.

I am currently using PSB Image 5t (main), 9C (center), 10S (surround), and subsonic 6 (sub). &nbsp;I have to crank the volume up pretty high (about -15 db) to get decent sound. &nbsp;Depending on the recording, I get sound distortions at higher volume.

Would you recommend an external amplifier? If yes, which one? &nbsp;Will I &quot;waste&quot; the Denon 2802 amp?

Thank you in advance for the advice.</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Would you recommend an external amplifier? If yes, which one?  Will I &quot;waste&quot; the Denon 2802 amp?
</td></tr></table>

Recommend External Amp?   Yes, maybe start with stereo amp for main L&amp;R speakers
.  .  .  .  .  .  .

Which one?  You might even try a used amp like a Parasound, or a Rotel, or an HK there are lots of good amp values used.

This depends on your main speaker specs.  Are they 8 Ohm or 4 Ohm?  What is their -3dB low frequency spec?  What do they list as their sensitivity, &lt;88dB?
.  .  .  .  .  .  .

waste Denon?  NO, just use the internal amps for the surrounds and center.
.  .  .  .  .  .  .

IMPORTANT

1) Is your sub a powered sub with it's own amp?

2) Does the Denon 2802 have L&amp;R preouts on the back?  If it doesn't then none of this applies.</font>
 
D

Dragon Warrior

Enthusiast
<font color='#000000'>Thanks Bruce for the reply.

I have attached the address for the specs of the speakers.

http://www.psbspeakers.com/s/ImageSpecs.html

The Denon 2802 does have a preout for all 6 channels, and the sub has an internal amp.

Do you think that it is worthwhile to get a 3-channel or 5-channel amp, or go with the 2-channel amp as you have suggested.</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"> Do you think that it is worthwhile to get a 3-channel or 5-channel amp, or go with the 2-channel amp as you have suggested. </td></tr></table>
The 5T mains are listed as 6 Ohms nominal that dip down to 4 Ohms.  They also list the power input as up to 175 watts, but indicate 250 watts is possible from dynamic peak input.

The 9C center is slightly less demanding at 8 Ohms nominal and dipping to 6 Ohms, with similiar input power ratings.

This means you need an amp with plenty of current (amp) capacity to drive the 5T mains near HT reference levels, which probably means an amp with at least 200 watts/channel into 4 Ohm loads and at least 45 amps peak/channel.  I would check the specs on any amps you consider for numbers in this range.

Stereo vs. 3-channel vs. 5-channel amp depends on what you want to spend.  The least expensive route wiil be to go with a stereo amp for the two main channels, the most expensive will be the 5 channel option at $1300 and up.

The center and main speakers deliver most of the output, and taking the mains off the Denon onto a separate amp will leave more reserve power for the Denon to drive the center and surrounds.</font>
 
D

Dragon Warrior

Enthusiast
<font color='#000000'>Thanks Bruce. &nbsp;You gave me much better advice than any salesman. &nbsp;In short, my denon at 90 watts/channel is not powerful enough to drive the speakers.</font>
 
Yamahaluver

Yamahaluver

Audioholic General
<font color='#0000FF'>I am driving my main channels with a seperate 260wpc Yamaha MX-1 amplifier. You can find this amp as well as the Denon POA and Marantz PA series for a good price. Stereo amps seemed to have dropped their prices due to the multi channel HT onslaught.

The Yamaha amp has a very warm sound and can drive into 1ohm load.</font>
 
G

Guest

Guest
<font color='#000000'>Yes, the amplifier must have enough watts per channel to drive the speakers correctly at higher volumes.

The key is that too few watts/channel can lead to clipping (when the volume is turned up) which can damage the speakers.  An amp with too much power is not a problem at all.

I expect the 90 wpc, is  a bit weak on the current (ampheres) delivery side which means it won't do a good job with 4 Ohm speakers (clipping is possible or automatic shutdown).  In fact many of these receivers recommend no less than 6 Ohm speakers because their power supplies are not designed to deliver the large amounts of current required by 4 Ohm speakers.

You don't have to worry about getting an amplifier with too many watts, your ears will give out before damaging the speakers.  I'd say a good separate stereo amp with at least 200 wpc @4 Ohms that weighs about 30 Lbs or more (weight means it has a big power supply and thus should have a good amphere rating for 4 Ohm speakers) will be the cheapest solution.</font>
 

Latest posts


newsletter
  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top