Samsung HW-C700 AV Receiver Review

A

admin

Audioholics Robot
Staff member
With the advent of Blu-ray players and advanced, hi-def gaming systems and all that they require, it has become increasingly important to have a centralized unit that can handle not only the latest audio formats, but also the centralizing of your HDMI sources. A recent quote from a popular TV show comes to mind, "Is there anything that money can't do?" If you have the means, you can get any number of high-end pieces to act as a video and sound hub for your AV/gaming needs, but for those without limitless resources, but with enough to get Blu-ray and the occasional Xbox 360 or PS3, there needs to be an economical answer to this need. The $399 HW-C700 receiver is Samsung's answer which packs many of the functions of a full-size receiver into a smaller chassis. This is a unit that can work with a large system but is also good for smaller living spaces where a larger component system is simply too much for the budget to support.


Discuss "Samsung HW-C700 AV Receiver Review" here. Read the article.
 
Seth=L

Seth=L

Audioholic Overlord
I'm surprised the reviewer gave the Samsung HW-C700 this good of a review. I figured this receiver would absolutely tank.
 
smurphy522

smurphy522

Full Audioholic
for my money........... I'd take a similarly priced Denon, H/K, Onkyo, Marantz or Yamaha. Of course I may lose one or two features. But would most likely gain in the audio quality and durability areas. They should remain concentrated in the video realm; where they and LG kick ***. Their current audio offerings are nothing to put on a list.
 
Marshall_Guthrie

Marshall_Guthrie

Audioholics Videographer Extraordinaire
"...you'll be hard-pressed to match this kind of value and flexibility for your hard-earned money."

But the value rating is a 2, which equals fair. Which is it, a value that is uneasily rivaled, or "fair"?
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Sounds like the perfect entry level receiver for those venturing into HT on a shoestring budget and who aren't fussy about their sound. It seems to do all the basics.

I'm confused about Fit & Finish and Build Quality have scored high and low respectively. Are't they the same thing? :confused:
 
M Code

M Code

Audioholic General
The Samsung AVRs have some neat features but have horrible HDMI interoperability as they do not submit their products to the HDMI/HDCP testing labs for certification. On the internal technical side, they use some DSP ICs from Pulsus a Korean start-up who supplies alot of the iPod/iPhone docks.

The primary motivation of Samsung was to have a line of AVRs so that they could sell a complete Samsung branded home theater system. Nice try but no cigar...
IF..They would slow down and study the AVR market more carefully they could do much better as they have significant technical and financial resources. But since they are selling tons of flat screens and Blu-ray players, AVRs simply have a low priority...

Just my $0.02... ;)
 
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Seth=L

Seth=L

Audioholic Overlord
I'd say they played it fairly smart, and I know they know how to make a great receiver.

They made these receivers with incredibly cheap parts and they are attempting to sell them at some pretty jacked up prices. I'm sure the profit margin on these puppies is exceptional since I'm assuming they don't expect to move many units. However, making a profit is making a profit, so it's perfectly logical for them to do so. I'm sure plenty of people will buy a Samsung receiver to match the rest of their Samsung gear. How often have you heard of someone that will only buy same brand name equipment. This ploy has worked great for the electronic's giant Sony for years. They sell an incredible amount of televisions, dvd players, blu-ray players, receivers, and speakers for a company that sells a little bit of everything. Companies like JVC and Panasonic have had similar ploys that have worked on and off, but not to the extent of Sony's success with it. Samsung runs neck and neck with Sony on flat panel television sales, moving into audio separates is logical.

I would like to see them put out a better product.
 
M Code

M Code

Audioholic General
I'd say they played it fairly smart, and I know they know how to make a great receiver.

They made these receivers with incredibly cheap parts and they are attempting to sell them at some pretty jacked up prices. I'm sure the profit margin on these puppies is exceptional since I'm assuming they don't expect to move many units. However, making a profit is making a profit, so it's perfectly logical for them to do so. I'm sure plenty of people will buy a Samsung receiver to match the rest of their Samsung gear. How often have you heard of someone that will only buy same brand name equipment. This ploy has worked great for the electronic's giant Sony for years. They sell an incredible amount of televisions, dvd players, blu-ray players, receivers, and speakers for a company that sells a little bit of everything. Companies like JVC and Panasonic have had similar ploys that have worked on and off, but not to the extent of Sony's success with it. Samsung runs neck and neck with Sony on flat panel television sales, moving into audio separates is logical.

I would like to see them put out a better product.
Samsung has sold alot of AVRs due its features and low price, but one should note in talking to 1 of the managers @ Fry's Electronics they have experienced a return rate of 27%... :eek:
Stay tuned for alot of B Stock units on E-Bay for $199 soon.. :rolleyes:

Just my $0.02... ;)
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Samsung has sold alot of AVRs due its features and low price, but one should note in talking to 1 of the managers @ Fry's Electronics they have experienced a return rate of 27%... :eek:
Stay tuned for alot of B Stock units on E-Bay for $199 soon.. :rolleyes:

Just my $0.02... ;)
27% you say. Is that all? :eek: :D
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Nope..
Reason is lack of interoperability with other HDMI components..

Just my $0.02... ;)
What? With all them standards kicking around and you still have interoperability issues? Who'd a thunk it? :D
 
B

Bismarck

Audioholic Intern
I have actually setup a number of these receivers and wouldn't give them too glowing of a review. They sound fine for the price, and match other Samsung components well. The lack of transcoding to HDMI is a real concern for me. Also, the lack of an audio return channel (ARC) is annoying for people using an OTA antenna hooked right to their TV.

I have had a number of problems with the receiver dropping audio. For a few clients, I have had to set their blu-ray Players to re-encode the new HD sound formats for the receiver to work properly.

Since the receiver is so lightweight I wonder if it is using a class A/B amp or a switching amp? Either way, power hasn't been a big issue for me.

Still, there is nothing that makes this receiver stand out over the other competition, other than the included iPod dock. The Denon AVR-591, for less money, has ARC, transcoding to HDMI, and a lot more setup features. The crossover on the Denon isn't global, you can set an volume limit so our kids don't crank it up too loud, and you can set a power on volume level. I am not a Denon fanboy, but their receiver at this price point is much better in my opinion.
 
Seth=L

Seth=L

Audioholic Overlord
Since the receiver is so lightweight I wonder if it is using a class A/B amp or a switching amp? Either way, power hasn't been a big issue for me.
I'm sure the Samsung uses a switching power supply feeding some derivitive of Class D amplification.
 
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