Onkyo TX NR696 + 4ohm speaker load =??

captainsnuggles

captainsnuggles

Audiophyte
Hi there, brand new here so bare with me.

Been into audio for a while but just dipped into home theater for the first time.

Setup as follows:
Onkyo TX NR696
Wharfedale Diamond 240's
Wharfedale Diamond 220c
Wharfedale Diamond 225's
TCL R635 55inch

Have some general questions around impedance. My reciever is rated to handle 4ohm loads and so far I have only had the chance to hook up my 240's (also rated at 4ohm load). So naturally while I was setting up the reciever I selected the 4ohm setting in the menu since I was powering 4ohm speakers.... Since then I've read the entire audioholics post on these 'selector switches' (mine not being a physical switch but in the menu) and how they hinder not help.

Caveats*
-I BiAmped my 240's from the open surround terminals to take some strain off the reciever (I think...)
-Just got the 225's and 220c so haven't hooked them up yet but both are 8ohm 'compatible'.

Questions:
- Should I set my menu to 8ohm speakers as recommended on this forum?
- Will Biamping actually take any strain off the internal amp?
- Does anyone have experience with the 240's and how hard they are to drive? I haven't been able to find any impedance curve data for them.
- Is my reciever actually enough for this surround setup?
- How in the world will I know if I'm pushing my reciever too hard when I turn up the volume? I really want to stretch the legs on my speakers but I'm a bit scared because of the 4ohm load.
- Any tips for someone brand new to AV Audio?

Thanks for reading!
 
captainsnuggles

captainsnuggles

Audiophyte
Do not set your receiver to 4 ohms (set it to 8 ohms or you may start current limiting things). Get rid of the biamp.
Get a subwoofer (if you don't have one) and crossover at 60 or 80 hz.
And last, but, not the least, get one of these coolers and set it on top of your receiver.
https://www.amazon.com/AC-Infinity-Rear-Exhaust-Receivers-Components/dp/B01LW0G46K#ace-g7448806443
Thanks for the reply! I was looking at making my own cooling system but that one looks slick.

How come you recommend getting rid of the BiAmp? Is it just a waste of resources or am I hurting something? My reciever is good to 7.1 and I don't need the extra channels right now so I figured it couldn't hurt.

I'm looking to get a sub but have maxxed my budget so it may be a year or two before I do.
 
pcosmic

pcosmic

Full Audioholic
Thanks for the reply! I was looking at making my own cooling system but that one looks slick.

How come you recommend getting rid of the BiAmp? Is it just a waste of resources or am I hurting something? My reciever is good to 7.1 and I don't need the extra channels right now so I figured it couldn't hurt.

I'm looking to get a sub but have maxxed my budget so it may be a year or two before I do.
I have a bigger overengineered receiver and i'm not familiar (a.k.a wouldn't want to assume things) about your Onkyo model. The circuitry and distribution for 5 channels driven vs 7 channels driven on your receiver is a unknown (however, they share the same power supply for how you have it biamped). Your speakers appear to be quite sensitive. So, you wouldn't have to keep cranking the volume knob (depending on how far away from the speakers you sit, listening levels, etc). It would be safe to assume they are not the easiest to drive though. If you can't hear a difference between how you have it biamped vs no-biamp (i think you won't hear a difference in your speakers), why bother? BUT, IF you can hear a difference, feel free to keep it. There are a few fire filled threads about this out here about this kinda thing.

A active sub crossed over can take some load off your receiver. That active cooler i suggested (very important) can be your safety net when you're cranking it up for hours.
 
captainsnuggles

captainsnuggles

Audiophyte
I have a bigger overengineered receiver and i'm not familiar (a.k.a wouldn't want to assume things) about your Onkyo model. The circuitry and distribution for 5 channels driven vs 7 channels driven on your receiver is a unknown (however, they share the same power supply for how you have it biamped). Your speakers appear to be quite sensitive. So, you wouldn't have to keep cranking the volume knob (depending on how far away from the speakers you sit, listening levels, etc). It would be safe to assume they are not the easiest to drive though. If you can't hear a difference between how you have it biamped vs no-biamp (i think you won't hear a difference in your speakers), why bother? BUT, IF you can hear a difference, feel free to keep it. There are a few fire filled threads about this out here about this kinda thing.

A active sub crossed over can take some load off your receiver. That active cooler i suggested (very important) can be your safety net when you're cranking it up for hours.
Thanks so much man, really appreciate the information.
 

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