Marantz SR7012 9.2CH Networking AV Receiver Reviewed!

gene

gene

Audioholics Master Chief
Administrator
Ratings
4,364 22 9
#1
We took the new SR7012 9.2CH Marantz AV receivers for a test drive. It's among the first crop of receivers to offer Amazon Alexa voice control and AirPlay 2 support (via firmware update). Along with robust HDR support and the latest HDMI 2.0 specifications, the SR7012 is at home in both smart homes and those wanting cutting edge tech.

It's good to see Marantz list the 2CH full bandwidth power rating first on their spec sheet and they also offer a 70% guarantee.

When we pressed Marantz on the meaning of their 70% guarantee, they reported the following:
SR7012 Rated Power Output: 90.5W x5ch (72.4% of 125W) at THD+N = 0.05%

Add eleven channels of processing; nine on-board, assignable amplification modules; HEOS multi-room streaming; hi-res audio playback; and support for every major consumer 3D audio format on the market today and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a better value-laden package.

sr7012.png

Read: Marantz SR7012 9.2CH Networking AV Receiver Review
 
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A

Audio-A

Enthusiast
#5
We took the new SR7012 9.2CH Marantz AV receivers for a test drive. It's among the first crop of receivers to offer Amazon Alexa voice control and AirPlay 2 support (via firmware update). Along with robust HDR support and the latest HDMI 2.0 specifications, the SR7012 is at home in both smart homes and those wanting cutting edge tech.

It's good to see Marantz list the 2CH full bandwidth power rating first on their spec sheet and they also offer a 70% guarantee.

When we pressed Marantz on the meaning of their 70% guarantee, they reported the following:
SR7012 Rated Power Output: 90.5W x5ch (72.4% of 125W) at THD+N = 0.05%

Add eleven channels of processing; nine on-board, assignable amplification modules; HEOS multi-room streaming; hi-res audio playback; and support for every major consumer 3D audio format on the market today and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a better value-laden package.

View attachment 24523
Read: Marantz SR7012 9.2CH Networking AV Receiver Review
Gene... I'm thinking of buy the Denon AVR 6300h since it was made in Japan plus it processes 11.2 Chanel's. I was looking at some other Marantz in comparison and it seems to me the 6300h is a better deal... no? If not, please advise me on what I'm not seeing.
Thx
A


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
H

hk2000

Junior Audioholic
Ratings
20
#7
Audioholics has had several articles on ONKYO/PIONEER inflating their power specs- even integrating the point into the title of the article, yet Marantz comes up with a product that is just as inflated and this is what we get:


". . . some companies cheat the specs by giving their power numbers into 6 ohms at 1kHz with 10% THD and only 1CH driven! Here at Audioholics we at least want a full bandwidth, two-channels driven into 8 ohms under 0.1% THD+N. It's good to see Marantz list the 2CH full bandwidth power rating first on their spec sheet . . ."

- All manufacturers I looked at, list a 2CH full bandwidth power rating on their spec sheet.
- That 70% guarantee is nothing but marketing crap- That's 452 watts- I suspect most receivers you criticized can do that just as well.
It weighs 30 lbs- That's all you need to know.

From Marantz spec sheet:
Number of Poweramps 9
Power Output (8 ohm, 20 Hz - 20 kHz, 0.08% 2ch Drive)110 W
Power Output (8 ohm, 20 Hz - 20 kHz, 0.05% 2ch Drive)125 W
Power Output (6 ohm, 1 kHz, 0.7% 2ch Drive)165 W
Power Output (6 ohm, 1 kHz, 10% 1ch Drive)235 W


Note that THD decreases as the power increases and that's just not possible!!

The thing has a MAXIMUM of 710 watts of power consumption, I don't know how its going to do 9 channels at 110 watts each.
 
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HowardS

Audiophyte
#8
Gene, I want to thank you and your team for all you do for the audio-video industry. I have been a lurker for number of years and decided to join the team. I really appreciate your website, YouTube videos and all the content you and your team work hard to produce. Great review on the SR7012. Ever since you did your unboxing video of the SR8012, I have had it in my shopping cart awaiting your review for a green light to pull the trigger on the purchase. My wife of 40 years passed away from cancer recently and I have decided to downsize my larger setup, but I don't want to sacrifice performance.

My current setup which is in storage for a few months more is the following:

Arcam AV8 Processor
Arcam CD37
OPPO UDP-203 (Still in the box)
Musical Fidelity M-250 monoblocs qty 3
ATI 250 5 channel amp for surrounds
Theil CS7 speakers L/R (17 years old)
Thiel MCS1 center
RSL CG4 surrounds
RSL Speed woofer 10 Analog Subwoofer
Anticable speaker and interconnects

I'm thinking I just want a single box AV/processor that can get me to 7.1.4 immersive sound but still satisfy my intense sickness for high res audio quality.

I recently purchase a set of passive KEF LS50s which I have not even unboxed yet. I also picked up the KEF Performance Speaker stands also still in the box. It was an impulse buy, not sure if I will ever use them. Lately I have had my eye on the Triton Reference, but have not heard those either.

I'm getting ready to start building a new small house and I would like to have my surrounds and sides in wall just like ceiling. Still trying to decide on which speakers, I don't want to spend a ton. I don't want in walls for fronts or center as I enjoy 2 channel music listening about 75% of the time. 25% surround music and HT.

Wondering if the SR8012 would perform at a high level with KEF LS50s and perhaps the Triton Reference. I suspect NO with my CS7s since I have tried many external multichannel amps including my ATI and they would not even cut it. I ended up with separate MF 250s to power them properly. My CS7s are also old and I suspect failures soon with no parts available. I already lost one tweeter and was able to get the last one Theil had in stock.

Sorry for the ramble.

Thanks again for all you guys do!
 
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P

PENG

Audioholic Overlord
Ratings
4,735 7 1
#9
It weighs 30 lbs- That's all you need to know.
I would agree with you to a point only but in fact you do need to know more than just weight. Some device may use more steel in their chassis, heavier heat sinks and transformers, others use lighter chassis material, heat sinks and add temperature controlled fans. Also, more costly transformers could have higher VA to weight ratio. Denon, and properly Marantz too, claimed to use custom make transformers, so if they wanted to , they could have make their transformers that produce higher VA per lb.

By the way, based on multiple bench test data in the past, the lighter Denon AVR out perform the heavier Harman Kardon's , example: AVR-3808 vs AVR-630 in 1,2,5 and all channel driven tests especially output into 4 ohms. Ironically, you can also buy a 50 W per channel Denon integrated amp for $6000 to $7000 that weighs over 60 lbs. There are no shortage of examples why weight by itself is not a good enough indicator of power output rating, and I am talking about class AB amps only.

From Marantz spec sheet:
Number of Poweramps 9
Power Output (8 ohm, 20 Hz - 20 kHz, 0.08% 2ch Drive)110 W
Power Output (8 ohm, 20 Hz - 20 kHz, 0.05% 2ch Drive)125 W
Power Output (6 ohm, 1 kHz, 0.7% 2ch Drive)165 W
Power Output (6 ohm, 1 kHz, 10% 1ch Drive)235 W


Note that THD decreases as the power increases and that's just not possible!!
How so? What you listed above clearly show THD increases NOT decreased at higher output levels.

The thing has a MAXIMUM of 710 watts of power consumption, I don't know how its going to do 9 channels at 110 watts each.
It has been pointed out many times on this forum, that we are not really sure what those power consumption specs mean, and that is compounded by the fact that different brands seem to use different basis and/or follow different rules, standards and/or regulations. Please note that Denon did not say that 710 watts is maximum, whereas Yamaha typically provides one number for power consumption and another (much higher number) for maximum power consumption. Lastly, Denon/Marantz did not say 110 watts with all 9 channels driven simultaneously and I have no doubt the each of the 9 channel of the Marantz SR7012 can output more than 110 watts at less than 0.1% THD.
 
H

hk2000

Junior Audioholic
Ratings
20
#10
I would agree with you to a point only but in fact you do need to know more than just weight. Some device may use more steel in their chassis, heavier heat sinks and transformers, others use lighter chassis material, heat sinks and add temperature controlled fans. Also, more costly transformers could have higher VA to weight ratio. Denon, and properly Marantz too, claimed to use custom make transformers, so if they wanted to , they could have make their transformers that produce higher VA per lb.
Most receivers of each manufacturer use the same materials in their receiver chassis, I don't see them using a differetn guage sheet matal or different chassis material just to make it weigh more. We know Marantz/Denon use AB amps, and you can bet their receivers use the same chassis with a different faceplate- I've been reseqarching receivers for a long time, and I'm pretty certain about this.
How so? What you listed above clearly show THD increases NOT decreased at higher output levels.
.05<.08, 125>110.
Denon/Marantz did not say 110 watts with all 9 channels driven simultaneously and I have no doubt the each of the 9 channel of the Marantz SR7012 can output more than 110 watts at less than 0.1% THD.
Well, if you're going to put it that way, why is Audioholics and most of us, readers here, have a problem with manufacturers specifying 1 channel only spec?
I use S&V reviews and measurements as reference- they have the best receiver review practice, which is to include measurements of receivers' power amp sections into 2, 5 and, almost always, 7 channels, here's their measurements of the Marantz 7012 which has the same power specs as the 7011:

Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 138.7 watts
1% distortion at 169.1 watts
Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 104.9 watts
1% distortion at 117.0 watts
Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 75.1 watts
1% distortion at 90.4 watts
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Overlord
Ratings
4,735 7 1
#11
Most receivers of each manufacturer use the same materials in their receiver chassis, I don't see them using a differetn guage sheet matal or different chassis material just to make it weigh more. We know Marantz/Denon use AB amps, and you can bet their receivers use the same chassis with a different faceplate- I've been reseqarching receivers for a long time, and I'm pretty certain about this.
You don't know that for sure. In fact if you look at the newer Marantz, the front plate is not even Aluminum, it is plastic. Also, the transformer in my old Denon 3805 looks huge but it's VA rating is definitely lower than the smaller ones in the current 4000 series. It is also a fact that the newer Denon from 4000 series and up has 2 to 4 fans, likely similar for the equivalently rated Marantz but that's my educated guess. All else being equal, different heat management techniques and efficiency would result in different overall weight period.

.05<.08, 125>110.
I read the manual, it says:

1528721329039.png


The 110 W one is obviously a typo (good catch though!),110 W 20 Hz-20 kHz with 0.08 % THD is for the SR6012. Top Denon and Marantz (not counting this year's 8012) models typically base their rated output on 0.05% THD.

Well, if you're going to put it that way, why is Audioholics and most of us, readers here, have a problem with manufacturers specifying 1 channel only spec?
I don't get that impression at all, there is no evidence (except perhaps some entry level models?) that D&M's receivers are "specifying 1 channel only spec".

I use S&V reviews and measurements as reference- they have the best receiver review practice, which is to include measurements of receivers' power amp sections into 2, 5 and, almost always, 7 channels, here's their measurements of the Marantz 7012 which has the same power specs as the 7011:

Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 138.7 watts
1% distortion at 169.1 watts
Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 104.9 watts
1% distortion at 117.0 watts
Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 75.1 watts
1% distortion at 90.4 watts
Well, then I assume you agree with me at least on this one point: " I have no doubt that each of the 9 channel of the Marantz SR7012 can output more than 110 watts at less than 0.1% THD. "

Edit: by the way, the measurements you posted are for the 7011, not 7012. I supposed you make a typo, no big deal but you got me excited for a few seconds, because I am curious to see if the 7012's measurements are the same or almost the same as the 7011, not so much the watts, but the distortions, SN, XT etc.
 
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AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Seriously, I have no life.
Ratings
6,794 16 6
#12
I suspect NO with my Theil CS7s since I have tried many external multichannel amps including my ATI and they would not even cut it. I ended up with separate MF 250s to power them properly.
AT2505 (250W x 5Ch) vs MF250 (250W x 1Ch) amps?

MF250: 260W into 8 ohms @ 1% THD x 1Ch.
https://www.soundandvision.com/content/musical-fidelity-m250-monoblock-power-amplifier-measurements

Outlaw/ATI 200x5 amp: 301W into 8 ohms @ 1% THD X 5 Ch Continuous.
https://www.soundandvision.com/content/outlaw-audio-7500-5-channel-power-amplifier-measurements

We can see that even the 200W ATI amp can output more power than the 250W MF amp, so no doubt the 250W ATI amp will output more power than the 250W MF amp.

The Audio Critic measured the ATI 60WPC amp stable into 1 ohm, so very little doubt the ATI 250WPC amp should also be stable down to 1 ohm.

I have a hard time seeing how the MF250 could power your speakers, but the AT2505 could not.

I used to own Revel Salon2 and B&W 802D2. My ATI AT2005 (200x5 amp) could easily power both speakers to deafening volume without any kind of strain.

Even my old ATI 60WPC amp could easily power the Revel Salon2 speakers to very high volume.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Overlord
Ratings
4,735 7 1
#13
AT2505 (250W x 5Ch) vs MF250 (250W x 1Ch) amps?

MF250: 260W into 8 ohms @ 1% THD x 1Ch.
https://www.soundandvision.com/content/musical-fidelity-m250-monoblock-power-amplifier-measurements

Outlaw/ATI 200x5 amp: 301W into 8 ohms @ 1% THD X 5 Ch Continuous.
https://www.soundandvision.com/content/outlaw-audio-7500-5-channel-power-amplifier-measurements

We can see that even the 200W ATI amp can output more power than the 250W MF amp, so no doubt the 250W ATI amp will output more power than the 250W MF amp.

The Audio Critic measured the ATI 60WPC amp stable into 1 ohm, so very little doubt the ATI 250WPC amp should also be stable down to 1 ohm.

I have a hard time seeing how the MF250 could power your speakers, but the AT2505 could not.

I used to own Revel Salon2 and B&W 802D2. My ATI AT2005 (200x5 amp) could easily power both speakers to deafening volume without any kind of strain.

Even my old ATI 60WPC amp could easily power the Revel Salon2 speakers to very high volume.
Did you post this to the wrong thread, regardless, are we talking about the Thiel CS7.2 that Stereophile had reviewed, even them didn't think those speakers are that difficult to drive. Definitely takes a good amp, but of course any ATI's 200 W/>300 W 8/4 ohm or Monolith's should be able to do it, but then again it always depend on the spl required, sitting distance, etc etc.

"Like most Jim Thiel designs, the CS7.2 features quite a low impedance over most of the audio band (fig.1),with a magnitude dropping to below 2.7 ohms above 8kHz and ranging between 2.9 ohms and 4.2 ohms between 60Hz and 8kHz. The electrical phase angle is generally low, however, meaning that a good amplifier rated into 4 ohms will be able to drive the speaker. The minimum value at 24Hz in the magnitude trace in fig.1 reveals the tuning of the passive radiator, implying excellent low-frequency extension. My estimate of the Thiel's B-weighted voltage sensitivity was 85dB/2.83V/1m—slightly lower than specified, and ruling out the use of amplifiers of less than 100W, in my opinion."
Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/thiel-cs72-loudspeaker-measurements#LTXPIysPcT8iZm9r.99
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Seriously, I have no life.
Ratings
6,794 16 6
#14
Did you post this to the wrong thread, regardless, are we talking about the Thiel CS7.2 that Stereophile had reviewed, even them didn't think those speakers are that difficult to drive. Definitely takes a good amp, but of course any ATI's 200 W/>300 W 8/4 ohm or Monolith's should be able to do it, but then again it always depend on the spl required, sitting distance, etc etc.

"Like most Jim Thiel designs, the CS7.2 features quite a low impedance over most of the audio band (fig.1),with a magnitude dropping to below 2.7 ohms above 8kHz and ranging between 2.9 ohms and 4.2 ohms between 60Hz and 8kHz. The electrical phase angle is generally low, however, meaning that a good amplifier rated into 4 ohms will be able to drive the speaker. The minimum value at 24Hz in the magnitude trace in fig.1 reveals the tuning of the passive radiator, implying excellent low-frequency extension. My estimate of the Thiel's B-weighted voltage sensitivity was 85dB/2.83V/1m—slightly lower than specified, and ruling out the use of amplifiers of less than 100W, in my opinion."
Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/thiel-cs72-loudspeaker-measurements#LTXPIysPcT8iZm9r.99
I posted that in response to his statement that the Music Fidelity 250W amp was able to power his CS7.2 speakers, yet the ATI 250W amp was unable to power his speakers. I just find it hard to believe.

It's kind of like hearing people claim that B&W speakers are so difficult to power and require a ton of power. Yet I was able to power the 802D2 to very high volume with just a Denon AVR-3112 receiver.

So maybe the point here is that the Marantz SR7012 AVR can power the Thiel speakers just fine.
 
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PENG

Audioholic Overlord
Ratings
4,735 7 1
#15
I posted that in response to his statement that the Music Fidelity 250W amp was able to power his CS7.2 speakers, yet the ATI 250W amp was unable to power his speakers. I just find it hard to believe.

It's kind of like hearing people claim that B&W speakers are so difficult to power and require a ton of power. Yet I was able to power the 802D2 to very high volume with just a Denon AVR-3112 receiver.

So maybe the point here is that the Marantz SR7012 AVR can power the Thiel speakers just fine.
Thiel recommended 100-500 W. So probably minimum 100 W for a small room for not too loud listening and 500 W for a larger room and listener who listens louder. No reason why a 4 ohm 400 W rated ATI amp cannot do a good job. Something else is wrong, I would assume..
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Seriously, I have no life.
Ratings
6,794 16 6
#16
Thiel recommended 100-500 W. So probably minimum 100 W for a small room for not too loud listening and 500 W for a larger room and listener who listens louder. No reason why a 4 ohm 400 W rated ATI amp cannot do a good job. Something else is wrong, I would assume..
Maybe it didn't produce that last bit of sparkle and air in the highs and enough palpitation and tachycardia in the lows. o_O o_O o_O
 
T

thatguyallday

Audiophyte
#17
I posted that in response to his statement that the Music Fidelity 250W amp was able to power his CS7.2 speakers, yet the ATI 250W amp was unable to power his speakers. I just find it hard to believe.

It's kind of like hearing people claim that B&W speakers are so difficult to power and require a ton of power. Yet I was able to power the 802D2 to very high volume with just a Denon AVR-3112 receiver.

So maybe the point here is that the Marantz SR7012 AVR can power the Thiel speakers just fine.
Not surprised by this. I'm using an 8012 to drive 3 Their Power Points and 4 Power Plains. They're fairly typical of Theil - 89dB sensitivity, 4 ohms nominal.

My ears run out of juice long before the Marantz breaks a sweat. Sounds fantastic.
 
H

hk2000

Junior Audioholic
Ratings
20
#18
by the way, the measurements you posted are for the 7011, not 7012. I supposed you make a typo, no big deal
The 7011 and 7012 have the the same power section. I meant to show you their measurement of the power output for the 7011 (and thus, 7012 being reviewed here, b/c they are identical, at least power-wise).
Look, I understand your point completely as far as the receiver being able to put out a certain amount of power into any channel at an given time, being that there hardly is ever a time where all channels would be required to put out max output simultaneousely, but, when reviewers talk about receivers' capability, they bring this up routinely, and the honest ones do not relentlesly thrash one manufacturer over a certain practice , but gloss over anothers' same exact behavior.
 
H

HowardS

Audiophyte
#19
Not a chance in hell. These are CS7 not 7.2. they drop well below 2.3 ohm. Sorry you find it hard to believe. I had several experts including myself 45 years in the industry and we all concluded the same thing. That is one of the reasons Jim Thiel made design changes to the CS7.2. This is not a debate, just the facts.

With that being said I love my ATI (First Gen 5 channel amp).
 
S

sjcguy

Junior Audioholic
#20
Houses are more expensive and built smaller. I also noticed speakers are also getting smaller so they don't take more spaces. On the other hand, they keep adding more channels to the receivers. How does that work? just a rant :)
 

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