Is there any benefit to using "auto-on" vs "always on" for your subwoofer?

5

55katest55

Audioholic
I thought there would be, but I was told that there really isn't and it's mostly for peace of mind. Thanks.
 
Adam

Adam

Audioholic Jedi
The benefit will depend on the sub's internal amp. I believe that the point of "auto on" was to decrease power consumption and internal heating. Depending on the amp, the standby power in "always on" might be nearly as low as it is in "auto on," so there might not be a significant benefit.

I noticed that my SVS is as warm to the touch in either mode when it's not being used, so I just leave it set to be always on. My previous sub, a B&W, was significantly warmer when always on, so I set it to "auto on."
 
5

55katest55

Audioholic
I totally meant to put this in the subwoofer forum, can someone move it if possible? Thanks and sorry!
 
its phillip

its phillip

Audioholic Ninja
If you have a kill a watt, just plug the sub into that before plugging it into the wall. Like Adam said, it all depends on the amp...it's possible there won't be much difference at all in energy usage when leaving it on vs leaving it in standby with auto-on.
 
Warpdrv

Warpdrv

Audioholic Ninja
Auto on works great - but sometimes people experience a delay when the subwoofer actually turns on. Many times the power coming from the Receiver/PreAmp isn't set high enough for the sub amp to sense its need to turn on. To adjust for that - you want to turn up the Receiver/PreAmp sub output level, and reduce the volume knob on the sub amp to get it just right.....

If your experiencing these types of problems, using your spl meter to get things setup properly - play the internal test tones on the Receiver/PreAmp for the sub, dial the sub output up a few db's, check the level at your seating location, then dial the sub volume back to compensate. Set it and forget it :D

Don't rely on Audyssey or any AUTO room correction to set your speaker levels properly, ALWAYS use an SPL meter to double check these settings....
 
Last edited:
Pyrrho

Pyrrho

Audioholic Ninja
For those who have problems with auto on not working well, they can try having it on and using something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Smart-Strip-SCG5-Autoswitching-Technology/dp/B000L9FQUO/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1317000573&sr=8-4

I use such devices for power amps and for computer peripherals, to automatically cut power to things when the main device is shut off. It saves power, and it is not dependent on a signal being sent to a subwoofer. Such devices work best when the "control" device uses some power when on, so that it is easy for the outlet strip to "know" that the device has been turned on.

In the case of a home theater, one would typically use the receiver as the "control" device, and receivers use enough power for it to be easy to set for sensitivity for the other outlets to turn on. A computer also used enough power to make such things easy to set (typically, one just leaves it as it comes, but there are instances when one will need to set the sensitivity of the device).

Frankly, I think this is a far better way than signal sensing. A 12 volt trigger system is also superior, if one's gear has that option.
 
B

bikdav

Senior Audioholic
I totally meant to put this in the subwoofer forum, can someone move it if possible? Thanks and sorry!
No problem. We found the question and it was not seriously out of line. I leave mine in the auto mode, because it does in fact save some power and it mine cools down when in stand-by mode.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
If the amp is always on, you'll usually hear a loud thump when the system turns on and that can damage the woofer.

The standard turn on sequence is:

Turn the sources on--> turn preamp on--> turn power amp(s) on

The standard turn OFF sequence is:

Turn power amp(s) OFF-->turn preamp OFF-->turn sources OFF
 
B

bikdav

Senior Audioholic
If the amp is always on, you'll usually hear a loud thump when the system turns on and that can damage the woofer.

The standard turn on sequence is:

Turn the sources on--> turn preamp on--> turn power amp(s) on

The standard turn OFF sequence is:

Turn power amp(s) OFF-->turn preamp OFF-->turn sources OFF
VERY GOOD POINT. That potentially damaging thump can show up in the event that power is disrupted _ like a very brief power outage for example.
 
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