highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Open it up and see if you can tighten down the transformer? I had to do that on one of my old Carver amps recently....
It probably wouldn't be a 'loose transformer' in its mounting, it would be windings in the transformer or the chassis vibrating because of the varying magnetic field.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
It probably wouldn't be a 'loose transformer' in its mounting, it would be windings in the transformer or the chassis vibrating because of the varying magnetic field.
Dunno, but it worked. Buzz went away....
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
So, I did some testing and some things I'm not able to test yet. Internet being one. Can't turn it off as my network would freak out a bit. Plus, have to have it to work.

Anyway, I'm not sold on it being a ground loop. Here's why:

If I unplug the cable from the receiver, no hum. If I plug the cable into the receiver, hum. If the receiver ISN'T plugged into the wall, hum.

One would think that if the receiver isn't plugged in, and the issue is a ground loop, then there would be no hum. There still is. As long as the cable is plugged into the receiver, I get a hum. Receiver being on or off has no effect.
When you connect the cable to the receiver with the power cord unplugged, is the receiver still connected to other equipment? If so, it's still a likely ground loop if the hum remains.

Do you have a test light (the kind with an incandescent bulb? If not, can you borrow one? Connect it to the receiver and touch the tip to the other equipment- if it illuminates at all, you have a difference in potential between the pieces. It won't be bright, but any illumination proves that voltage is present.

Or, you could use the advice I got from my mom when I said that my turntable was humming- "Teach it the words".
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
If it is a network cable the cat7 standard is shielded end to end and may help with bonding your network devices. Cat7 is the standard rj45 connector and will work with your current equipment. I use cat 7 myself.
Cat7 DOES NOT use a standard RJ45 connector- a Cat7 end is grounded, the 'standard' RJ45 isn't. Also, all parts of the network would need to be wired and terminated to the Cat7 standard in order to work as designed.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
When you connect the cable to the receiver with the power cord unplugged, is the receiver still connected to other equipment? If so, it's still a likely ground loop if the hum remains.

Do you have a test light (the kind with an incandescent bulb? If not, can you borrow one? Connect it to the receiver and touch the tip to the other equipment- if it illuminates at all, you have a difference in potential between the pieces. It won't be bright, but any illumination proves that voltage is present.

Or, you could use the advice I got from my mom when I said that my turntable was humming- "Teach it the words".
Good point. Signal has to be coming from somwhere else. I'll have to see if my server is still plugged in via HDMI. I would think that would be the most likely culprit.
 
S

stalag2005

Audioholic
Cat7 DOES NOT use a standard RJ45 connector- a Cat7 end is grounded, the 'standard' RJ45 isn't. Also, all parts of the network would need to be wired and terminated to the Cat7 standard in order to work as designed.
Cat 7 plugs directly into an RJ45 port. Whether grounded or not it is RJ45 unless you can show otherwise. Everything I have seen shows it to be yes grounded but still RJ45.
 
S

stalag2005

Audioholic
Cat 7 plugs directly into an RJ45 port. Whether grounded or not it is RJ45 unless you can show otherwise. Everything I have seen shows it to be yes grounded but still RJ45.
To add here even wikipedia mentions the correct connector name is and I quote " 8P8C connector, which is commonly referred to as "RJ-45" even though that might not be precisely correct nomenclature. " To me the shape and direct pluggable capability makes it "rj45" even if not technically correct.


 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Cat 7 plugs directly into an RJ45 port. Whether grounded or not it is RJ45 unless you can show otherwise. Everything I have seen shows it to be yes grounded but still RJ45.
It fits, but it's gounded and technically, the standard for Cat6 and Cat7 is called 8P8Cm as you posted (didn't show in the post I was responding to) The ends aren't the same, the cable isn't the same and there's no provision for grounding the cable in or to the end. Cat6 and Cat78 use heavier gauge wires in the cable as well as a plastic spline to separate the wire pairs. In addition, the outside diameter of Cat6 and 7 is larger than Cat5e and thetwist rate for Cat5 is different, contributing to its inability to handle the higher data rate of the other two, although Cat5e will work for gigabit if the cable run isn't too long. Cat6 is used by many integrators as their 'go-to', but it's not required and Cat7 is effectively a dead standard. according to the second link.


 
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