How can a remastered film be ultra widescreen??

Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Field Marshall

I’m in disbelief how this is possible? And it looks way better then dvd in my newer tv
Dvd format
Ultimate bass lover !! si ht15 dvc.
Free the reptile aliens
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Field Marshall
are you Saying that very old films can be filmed in widescreen or they are remastered??
Huge bars on so many movies in effect cutting hdtv heights in half . Or 1/4
These movies are so wide they essentially ruin hdtv 16:9 format causing you to need a significantly larger tv or projector .
4:3 was superior to the widescreen formats of today imo.!
16:9 is better then ultra widescreen with bars .
So theaters don’t just get real 4k 4096 to our lower nerfed version . They can fit movies with bars without losing near the screen size we do .
A massive screen is not hurt by bars like a home theater is .
So my 55” is more like a 42” after bars of a 2:40 movie or whatever super wide is .

Ultimate bass lover !! si ht15 dvc.
Free the reptile aliens
 
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everettT

everettT

Audioholic Ninja
are you Saying that very old films can be filmed in widescreen or they are remastered??
Huge bars on so many movies in effect cutting hdtv heights in half . Or 1/4
These movies are so wide they essentially ruin hdtv 16:9 format causing you to need a significantly larger tv or projector .
4:3 was superior to the widescreen formats of today imo.!
16:9 is better then ultra widescreen with bars .
So theaters don’t just get real 4k 4096 to our lower nerfed version . They can fit movies with bars without losing near the screen size we do .
A massive screen is not hurt by bars like a home theater is .
So my 55” is more like a 42” after bars of a 2:40 movie or whatever super wide is .

Ultimate bass lover !! si ht15 dvc.
Free the reptile aliens
As the article states, most all film is/was shot in a widescreen format. Remastering usually is audio and pic quality
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
They can crop any movie digitally.

What many people don't realize is that 35mm films are actually equivalent to 4K resolution and 70mm films are equivalent to 12K resolution!

As long as the original 35mm and 70mm films are in awesome condition, they can scan the films to 4K digital and have awesome picture quality.

That's why Christopher Nolan continues to use 70mm films for his movies. Yeah, if they ever have 12K BluRay, he can scan his 70mm films to 12K and not miss a single resolution. :D
 
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everettT

everettT

Audioholic Ninja
They can crop any movie digitally.

What many people don't realize is the 35mm films are actually equivalent to 4K resolution and 70mm films are equivalent to 12K resolution!

As long as the original 35mm and 70mm films are in awesome condition, they can scan the films to 4K digital and have awesome picture quality.

That's why Christopher Nolan continues to use 70mm films for his movies. Yeah, if they ever have 12K BluRay, he can scan his 70mm films to 12K and not miss a single resolution. :D
Stop making sense for one person :eek:
 
BoredSysAdmin

BoredSysAdmin

Audioholic Overlord
35mm = 4k isn't exactly accurate. You could get more details with a 4k scan of 35mm film, but only if the film's original condition is good enough the optics and processing used in shooting original movies were sharp enough to have additional details. Otherwise that you get with 4k remasters is A LOT OF what essentially is massive painstaking restoration work.
Exactly the same goes for 70mm.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
35mm = 4k isn't exactly accurate. You could get more details with a 4k scan of 35mm film, but only if the film's original condition is good enough the optics and processing used in shooting original movies were sharp enough to have additional details. Otherwise that you get with 4k remasters is A LOT OF what essentially is massive painstaking restoration work.
Exactly the same goes for 70mm.
Do you know the exact accurate resolution numbers?

I’ve seen some sources say 35mm = 4K and some say 35mm = 6K.

Some say 70mm = 18K, some say 70mm = 12K.
 
BoredSysAdmin

BoredSysAdmin

Audioholic Overlord
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
I see.

Although technically 35mm films have 5400 x 3600 “resolution” (or 5.4K) — it’s ultimately an apple-to-orange comparison between film and digital camera.

For one thing (probably salient thing) — films have GRAIN NOISE and great digital cameras don’t have as much grain noise. So even a 70mm film will have some grain noise, but a great 4K Digital Video will have virtually no grain noise.

Bottom line is that if the 35mm and especially 70mm films are in pristine condition or if they do an amazing job restoring them, these films can look awesome when scanned to 4K Digital format.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Field Marshall
They can crop any movie digitally.

What many people don't realize is that 35mm films are actually equivalent to 4K resolution and 70mm films are equivalent to 12K resolution!

As long as the original 35mm and 70mm films are in awesome condition, they can scan the films to 4K digital and have awesome picture quality.

That's why Christopher Nolan continues to use 70mm films for his movies. Yeah, if they ever have 12K BluRay, he can scan his 70mm films to 12K and not miss a single resolution. :D
Wow 12k I had no idea why don’t they make a tv that high in pixels? I though 70mm was IMAX or xd cinema the wall to wall screen format makes since to use it. Hehe original 35mm as always considered hd weird that it took TVs over 50 years to become high definition. ??
I was curious how they make old movies somhigh def and super wide bars in my hdtv .

Ultimate bass lover !! si ht15 dvc.
Free the reptile aliens
 
B

baronvonellis

Audioholic
Wow 12k I had no idea why don’t they make a tv that high in pixels? I though 70mm was IMAX or xd cinema the wall to wall screen format makes since to use it. Hehe original 35mm as always considered hd weird that it took TVs over 50 years to become high definition. ??
I was curious how they make old movies somhigh def and super wide bars in my hdtv .

Ultimate bass lover !! si ht15 dvc.
Free the reptile aliens
If you read the article on the second post on here -

Hollywood responded by creating a large number of wide-screen formats: CinemaScope (up to 2.6:1), Todd-AO (2.20:1), and VistaVision (initially 1.50:1, now 1.6:1 to 2.00:1) to name just a few.
So old movies could be wider than 16x9 TVs with black bars.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Field Marshall
If you read the article on the second post on here -

Hollywood responded by creating a large number of wide-screen formats: CinemaScope (up to 2.6:1), Todd-AO (2.20:1), and VistaVision (initially 1.50:1, now 1.6:1 to 2.00:1) to name just a few.
So old movies could be wider than 16x9 TVs with black bars.
I had no idea old movies could have bars. It seems like unless you have a projector movies are always going to cut out a massive portion of your tv . Occasionally you get one That fits , Or has small bars . Why can’t they re format it for home without losing movie content?
16;9 is just not ideal for movies why didn’t they make a tv wider for films ? 16:9 is sub par to 4:3 as far as screen size but easier to see . Only tv programming fits hdtv well
Say you have a 55” tv you lose a lot of heighth with bars it would only make sense for them to make the tv wider for bigger aspect ratios.
Maybe directors intentionally or unintentionally ruin it for people who watch movies at home .
Bars probably are better then the smaller screen size of these oddities
 
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B

baronvonellis

Audioholic
Movies and TV's were originally the same format 4:3 in the 40's and early 50's. Then people stopped going to movies when TV became popular in the early 50's. So to get people to keep going to the movies, they came out with widescreen formats and 3d movies. The widescreen formats worked to get people back in the theaters, 3D not as much. The last thing the filmmakers wanted was to make it the same format as TV.

Most movies are filmed in 1.85:1 ratio which is very close to the 16x9 ratio of 1.7:1 so those movies look great on TVs today.

Other film makers prefer ultra wide ratios for a more cinematic experience in the theatre, and typically those films have been very popular and are seen as more prestigious to film makers. You also have to move your head a bit back and forth to view all the action on screen, and that tends to make you more engaged in the experience. More like you are watching a stage play, and audiences tend to respond to that better. Film makers aspire to make movies for theatre, not typically for home viewing. With film makers making movies for streaming services such as Netfilx and Amazon, they do seem to film at 16x9 usually I've noticed.

Yea, there are some computer monitors like that that are ultra wide, I have one myself. It's more designed for multitasking with multiple windows open at once, but you can watch ultra wide movies on it as well.

I haven't seen ultra wide TV's for home theatre. I suppose if the black bars really bother you, you could use a zoom setting on your TV to have it fill the screen. I never notice the black bars myself.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Field Marshall
Movies and TV's were originally the same format 4:3 in the 40's and early 50's. Then people stopped going to movies when TV became popular in the early 50's. So to get people to keep going to the movies, they came out with widescreen formats and 3d movies. The widescreen formats worked to get people back in the theaters, 3D not as much. The last thing the filmmakers wanted was to make it the same format as TV.

Most movies are filmed in 1.85:1 ratio which is very close to the 16x9 ratio of 1.7:1 so those movies look great on TVs today.

Other film makers prefer ultra wide ratios for a more cinematic experience in the theatre, and typically those films have been very popular and are seen as more prestigious to film makers. You also have to move your head a bit back and forth to view all the action on screen, and that tends to make you more engaged in the experience. More like you are watching a stage play, and audiences tend to respond to that better. Film makers aspire to make movies for theatre, not typically for home viewing. With film makers making movies for streaming services such as Netfilx and Amazon, they do seem to film at 16x9 usually I've noticed.

Yea, there are some computer monitors like that that are ultra wide, I have one myself. It's more designed for multitasking with multiple windows open at once, but you can watch ultra wide movies on it as well.

I haven't seen ultra wide TV's for home theatre. I suppose if the black bars really bother you, you could use a zoom setting on your TV to have it fill the screen. I never notice the black bars myself.
ZOom setting is worse I’d rather deal with bars then cut out part of the film . Id use zoom on the first few films til I realized it was cutting out part of the film.
High Ticket prices are ruining the cinema imo . Super wide wide angel Shots look good in theaters and poor at home .
I guess black bars aren’t that huge a deal compared to 4:3 and the super tall old style projector TVs . Picture quality siren
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William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Warlord
ZOom setting is worse I’d rather deal with bars then cut out part of the film . Id use zoom on the first few films til I realized it was cutting out part of the film.
High Ticket prices are ruining the cinema imo . Super wide wide angel Shots look good in theaters and poor at home .
I guess black bars aren’t that huge a deal compared to 4:3 and the super tall old style projector TVs . Picture quality siren View attachment 32030View attachment 32031View attachment 32032
I agree. Ticket prices are kinda stupid these days. 4:3 is stoopider though. Lol
 

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