Home theater from scratch

R

RodHQ

Audiophyte
Hi! I wasn't sure whether this board would be best for my question or Room Acoustics would be better, so feel free to move it in case I got it wrong. This is my very first post

Basically, I'm starting to plan out my HT, which, if life permits, I'll be able to build from scratch, I thought this could be a good opportunity to get the best sounding room as possible, but I do have a couple questions:

Is a rectangular room the best? I know it's better than a square room, but is it actually the best shape? Or is that just the most common one because houses are traditionally built in those shapes? (If a triangle sounds best, I'll build a triangle, if making edges round instead of 90 degree is better, I'll have them rounded out)

Here In Mexico our houses are usually built out of concrete blocks (plastered with cement) and the floors are usually tiles (I wanted to put polished concrete, but I already know that's a horrible idea, at least for this room). Should I go with different materials? Can I build into the cement shapes that will help the room sound better (Like adding bumps similar to the ones acoustic foam has)
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Room acoustics in the construction phase is a pretty deep subject. The sky is the limit for how far you can take it.

As for the room shape, that really only impacts low frequencies. There are things you can do to mitigate that. I wouldn't be worried about room shape so much.

You definitely do not need to add cement shapes into the room.

If this is a plan that you intend to invest a lot of time, money, and effort, you might just want to hire an acoustician. There is a lot to learn.

A good place to learn about acoustic is in the book Sound Reproduction by Floyd Toole. He has a great supplementary site that is some very good reading for what you want to do, here and here. Definitely read his papers about designing a home theater or listening room.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic General
Room acoustics in the construction phase is a pretty deep subject. The sky is the limit for how far you can take it.

As for the room shape, that really only impacts low frequencies. There are things you can do to mitigate that. I wouldn't be worried about room shape so much.

You definitely do not need to add cement shapes into the room.

If this is a plan that you intend to invest a lot of time, money, and effort, you might just want to hire an acoustician. There is a lot to learn.

A good place to learn about acoustic is in the book Sound Reproduction by Floyd Toole. He has a great supplementary site that is some very good reading for what you want to do, here and here. Definitely read his papers about designing a home theater or listening room.
Wtf ? I’d say only if your rich and spending tens of thousands you would need a special acoustic specialist...
I’ve never heard anything about these before
acoustician exist ???

Concrete does not transmit sound like a wooden home so you can pick out whatever speaker brand you like ...
any clues what Mexico has available near you ?


Theater rooms you may need construction help for sure ..
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Wtf ? I’d say only if your rich and spending tens of thousands you would need a special acoustic specialist...
I’ve never heard anything about these before
acoustician exist ???

Concrete does not transmit sound like a wooden home so you can pick out whatever speaker brand you like ...
any clues what Mexico has available near you ?


Theater rooms you may need construction help for sure ..
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No offense kingnoob, but I don't think your involvement in audio would lead you to meet many acoustisians.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic General
No offense kingnoob, but I don't think your involvement in audio would lead you to meet many acoustisians.
No reason for a budget theater user to consult or pay for any help in that area
My bedroom has terrible acoustics sadly .
I don’t watch enough movies to care
That’s like putting expensive rims on a junk car not wort anything.

I mean professional movie theaters might use them .
You definitely need a expensive system to need there help but yes I’d imagine they exist to help ..



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
No reason for a budget theater user to consult or pay for any help in that area
My bedroom has terrible acoustics sadly .
I don’t watch enough movies to care
That’s like putting expensive rims on a junk car not wort anything.

I mean professional movie theaters might use them .
You definitely need a expensive system to need there help but yes I’d imagine they exist to help ..



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
He is willing to add extensive construction to his room, which suggests he is going to be taking it seriously.
 
TheWarrior

TheWarrior

Audioholic Ninja
Hi! I wasn't sure whether this board would be best for my question or Room Acoustics would be better, so feel free to move it in case I got it wrong. This is my very first post

Basically, I'm starting to plan out my HT, which, if life permits, I'll be able to build from scratch, I thought this could be a good opportunity to get the best sounding room as possible, but I do have a couple questions:

Is a rectangular room the best? I know it's better than a square room, but is it actually the best shape? Or is that just the most common one because houses are traditionally built in those shapes? (If a triangle sounds best, I'll build a triangle, if making edges round instead of 90 degree is better, I'll have them rounded out)

Here In Mexico our houses are usually built out of concrete blocks (plastered with cement) and the floors are usually tiles (I wanted to put polished concrete, but I already know that's a horrible idea, at least for this room). Should I go with different materials? Can I build into the cement shapes that will help the room sound better (Like adding bumps similar to the ones acoustic foam has)
Rectangle is easier to calculate room modes with. But that is all, it is an easier space but is not superior.

If your walls are cement, you will need to find a way to hide cables. I don't have a picture, but I have been using mahogany boards that I sand and finish to look attractive. On the back side, I route a channel for cables to hide. Just an example of what you can do without hiding cables in walls.
 

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