Help with amplifier controls

R

Rizos_zl1

Audiophyte
Hello, I have a crown xli1500 rated for 330 watts @ 8ohms to power my Cerwin Vega E-712 that are 300 watts with 8ohm impedance. My question is what do the channel 1 and channel 2 knob controls actually do? Should I have it set all the way up to allow all 330 watts to reach the speakers or how exactly does it work?
 
NINaudio

NINaudio

Audioholic Chief
Those are gain controls to match the input voltage from your receiver. Where is the amp getting it's signal from?
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Spartan
Hello, I have a crown xli1500 rated for 330 watts @ 8ohms to power my Cerwin Vega E-712 that are 300 watts with 8ohm impedance. My question is what do the channel 1 and channel 2 knob controls actually do? Should I have it set all the way up to allow all 330 watts to reach the speakers or how exactly does it work?
Just like NIN said, those are "gain knobs". To be more accurate and precise, those are "input attenuator knobs".

I tend to run mine (on any general amp) in the maxed-out position, which effectively removes them from the signal path......unless there is some problem, then I dial them back until the problem is gone. Typically, "some problem" would be an artifact of poor gain structure and would manifest as either tweeter hiss or high noise floor.

Another reason you may choose to dial them back would be to limit the max possible volume SPL to avoid a chance of speaker damage. I would tend to think people with children would be the most likely to use it in that manner.

EDIT: To really get the best benefit of them, it would be ideal to measure your inputs/outputs along the signal path to properly set the gain structure to avoid clipping. The average user doesn't posses the tools nor the knowledge on how to do this, so it usually ends up as trial and error.
 
R

Rizos_zl1

Audiophyte
Just like NIN said, those are "gain knobs". To be more accurate and precise, those are "input attenuator knobs".

I tend to run mine (on any general amp) in the maxed-out position, which effectively removes them from the signal path......unless there is some problem, then I dial them back until the problem is gone. Typically, "some problem" would be an artifact of poor gain structure and would manifest as either tweeter hiss or high noise floor.

Another reason you may choose to dial them back would be to limit the max possible volume SPL to avoid a chance of speaker damage. I would tend to think people with children would be the most likely to use it in that manner.

EDIT: To really get the best benefit of them, it would be ideal to measure your inputs/outputs along the signal path to properly set the gain structure to avoid clipping. The average user doesn't posses the tools nor the knowledge on how to do this, so it usually ends up as trial and error.
Would you say the amp and speaker combo I have is a good fit for each other. Is that amp feeding the speakers enough power?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Slumlord
Would you say the amp and speaker combo I have is a good fit for each other. Is that amp feeding the speakers enough power?
I'd say more than enough power. A speaker's max wattage rating is more a melting point than a useful power figure. Those speakers have a high sensitivity spec (even if exaggerated a bit, still quite sensitive) so it doesn't take much power to reach extremely loud levels. Try this calculator http://myhometheater.homestead.com/splcalculator.html to get an idea of the relationship between amp power, the distance you are from the speakers, and the speakers' sensitivity.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Spartan
Would you say the amp and speaker combo I have is a good fit for each other. Is that amp feeding the speakers enough power?
LOL....YESSSSS! Enough power for earbleed levels all day long!
 
S

sanderrz3W

Audiophyte
Rizos_zl1, honestly, it seems like a lot of Sony models have such problems. I've faced it twice on my own.
 

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